This is the draft style guide for the 1997 Dukes of Ale Spring Thing


A. ALE


  1. Big Brittish Ales
    a)
    Barley Wine
    b)
    English Old / Strong Ale
    c)
    Scottish Strong Ale
  2. Robust English Ale
    a)
    India Pale Ale
    b)
    English Strong (Extra Special) Bitter
  3. Light Scottish Ale
    a)
    Scottish Light Ale
    b)
    Scottish Heavy Ale
    c)
    Scottish Export Ale
  4. Brown and Mild Ales
    a)
    English Light Mild
    b)
    English Dark Mild
    c)
    English Brown
    d)
    American Brown
  5. Traditional English Ale
    a)
    Classic English Pale Ale
    b)
    English Ordinary Bitter
    c)
    English Best (Special) Bitter
  6. American Pale Ale
    a)
    American Pale Ale
  7. Porter
    a)
    Robust Porter
    b)
    Brown Porter
  8. Traditional Stout
    a)
    Classic Irish-Style Dry Stout
    b)
    Foreign-Style Stout
  9. Robust Stout
    a)
    Sweet Stout
    b)
    Oatmeal Stout
    c)
    Imperial Stout
  10. American Micro Standards
    a)
    American Wheat
    b)
    Blonde Ale
    c)
    Amber Ale


B. LAGER


  1. American Standards
    a)
    American Lager
    b)
    American Style Light Lager
    c)
    American Lager/Ale or Cream Ale
    d)
    American Style Premium Lager
    e)
    Dry Lager
    f)
    Malt Liquor
    g)
    American Dark Lager
  2. Bock
    a)
    Traditional Bock
    b)
    German Style Helles Bock Maibock
    c)
    Doppelbock
    d)
    Eisbock
  3. Munich and Dortmund Lagers
    a)
    Munich Dunkel
    b)
    Muenchner Style Helles
    c)
    Dortmunder or European Style Export
  4. Pilsener
    a)
    German Pilsener
    b)
    Bohemian Pilsener
  5. Vienna and Märzen Oktoberfest
    a)
    Vienna
    b)
    Märzen/Oktoberfest


C. SPECIALTY

READ THIS BEFORE ENTERING A SPECIALTY BEER!

The brewer must provide aditional information about their beer for many of the Specialty styles. Please provide this information on your entry forms.


  1. Mixed Ale-Lager Styles
    a)
    Kölsch
    b)
    Düsseldorf Style Altbier
    c)
    California Common Beer
  2. German Wheat Beers
    a)
    Weizen/Weissbier
    b)
    Dunkelweizen
    c)
    Weizenbock
  3. Belgian and French Ales
    a)
    Abbey Double
    b)
    Abbey Triple
    c)
    Belgian Ale
    d)
    Belgian Strong Ale
    e)
    Bière de Garde
    f)
    Saison
  4. Sour Beers
    a)
    Oud Bruin Flanders Brown/Red
    b)
    Oud Bruin, with fruit (Specify fruit) Flanders Brown/Red
    c)
    Wit
    d)
    pLambic and pGueue
    e)
    pLambic, with fruit (Specify fruit)
    f)
    Berliner Weisse
  5. Smoked and Schwarzbier
    a)
    Bamberg Style Rauchbier
    b)
    Classic Style Smoked Beer (Specify classic style)
    c)
    Other Smoked Beer (Specify description as for Specialty category)
    d)
    Schwarzbier
  6. Fruit and Vegetable Beer
    a)
    Fruit and Vegetable Beer (Specify lager/ale and fruit)
    b)
    Classic-Style Fruit and Vegetable Beer (Specify classic style and fruit)
  7. Herb and Spice Beer
    a)
    Herb and Spice Beer (Specify lager/ale and spices)
    b)
    Classic-Style Herb and Spice Beer (Specify classic style and herbs)
  8. Specialty (Misc.), and Chili Beer
    a)
    Specialty Beer (Specify special ingredients or techniques)
    b)
    Classic Style Specialty Beer (Specify classic style and special ingredients or techniques)
    c)
    Chili Beer (Specify ale/lager and intensity of hot flavor; mild, balanced, hot, very hot)


D. MEAD

On all meads, the brewer should indicate all four of the following modifiers
Variety of honey Clover, Alfalfa, Orange Blossom, Mesquite, Wildflower...
Strength Hydromel, OG of less than 1.080; Standard, OG between 1.080 and 1.120; Sack, OG greater than 1.120
Sweetness Dry, FG less than 1.010; Medium, FG between 1.010 and 1.025; Sweet, FG greater than 1.025
Carbonation Level Still, slight effervescence is acceptable.
Sparkling, Strong effervescence and tingly mouthfeel. Tiny bubbles are prefered.

Additional modifiers are indicated with the sub-category.


M1
Traditional Mead
M2
Melomel (Specify fruit)
M3
Metheglin(Specify Herbs)
M4
Braggot(Specify malt type; light, amber, dark)
M5
Mixed Category Mead (Specify fruit, spice, malt type, chili as appropriate)


If you have any questions about the style guidelines, contact Aaron Birenboim at (505) 293-0110, or e-mail mole@netcom.com. The full NM State Fair ProAm style guidelines are available on the World Wide Web at http://www.aptec.com/~birenboi/beer/proAm_style.html.



A. ALE


1) Big Brittish Ales
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Barley Wine Malty, vinous, alchahol, fruity-ester, very low diacetyl Tawny copper to dark brown, Chill haze allowable High residual malty sweetness Full
14-22 SRM 50-100 IBU OG 1.090-120
Complexity of alcohols and fruity-ester characters are often high and counter-balanced by the perception of low to assertive bitterness and extraordinary alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavor may be minimal to very high. A caramel and vinous aroma and flavor is part of the character.

Commercial examples: Anchor's Old Foghorn, Young's Old Nick, Sierra Nevada Bigfoot, Rogue Old Crustacean

b) English Old / Strong Ale Fruity-estery Amber to copper, Chill haze acceptable Malty sweet, fruity, balanced bitterness Medium to full
10-16 SRM 30-40 IBU OG 1.055-75
Fruity-ester flavor and aroma should contribute to the character of this ale. Bitterness should be evident and balanced with malt and/or caramel sweetness. Alcohol types can be varied and complex.

Commercial examples: Theakston's Old Peculier, Young's Winter Warmer, Thomas Hardy's

c) Scottish Strong Ale Medium to high diacetyl, hop aroma low to absent, malty, may have slight roastiness or smokiness Deep copper to very black, not opaque Overwhelmingly malty, Low to medium hop bitterness, hop flavor low or absent, diacetyl, may be roasty and/or smoky Full
10-47 SRM 25-35 IBU OG 1.050-1.100
In this style it is quite common for the fermentation to be roused so the yeast will stay in suspension and attenuate the beer. There can be medium to high diacetyl present. These beers are much less hopped than English Strong Ales. They are overwhelmingly malty with some kettle caramelization. Slight roasted malt qualities may be provide by the limited use of dark roasted malt or roasted barley. Faint smoky character is OK. Malt character balanced by clean alcohol flavors.

Commercial examples: Belhaven's 90/-, McEwan's Scotch Ale, Traquir House Bear Ale, Gordon Highland Scotch Ale, Caledonian Edinburgh Strong Ale, Rose Street Auld Reekie 90/-, Glaschu Double Whammy, Maclays Scotch Ale, Maclays Old Alloa Ale, Harviestoun Old Manor.

2) Robust English Ale
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) India Pale Ale Full, flowery hop aroma. Fruity-ester moderate to very strong. Golden to deep-copper. Chill haze allowable. May have strong hop flavor in addition to intense hop bitterness. Medium maltiness, yet crisp and dry due to high hops and minerals. High alchahol content. Fruity-ester moderate to very strong. Medium
8-14 SRM 40-60 IBU OG 1.050-70
Characterized by intense hop bitterness with a high alcohol content. A high hopping rate and the use of water with high mineral content results in a crisp, dry beer.
b) English Strong (Extra Special) Bitter Medium to strong hops. Fruity-ester character. Low diacetyl acceptable. Golden to copper. Chill haze acceptable. Medium to strong hop flavor and bitterness. Malt sweetness more pronounced than other bitters. Fruity-ester character. Low diacetyl allowable. Well attenuated for its strength, yet full bodied.
12-14 SRM 30-55 IBU OG 1.046-60
Good hop character and mild carbonation traditionally characterize draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Fruity-ester character and very low diacetyl (butterscotch) character are acceptable in aroma and flavor. The residual malt sweetness of this richly flavored, full-bodied bitter is more pronounced than in other bitters.

3) Light Scottish Ale
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Scottish Light Ale Malty, no hop aroma. Low diacetyl and sulpher ok. May posess faint smoke. Golden-amber to deep brown. Chill haze is acceptable. Malty, little hop bitterness, no hop flavor or aroma. May have faint smoke. Soft and chewy yet light-bodied.
8-17 SRM 9-20 IBU OG 1.030-35
Rounded flavor profile, malty, caramellike, soft and chewy with low hop rates. Little hop bitterness, and no perceived hop flavor or aroma. Yeast characters such as diacetyl (butterscotch) and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. May possess a faint smoky character. Bottled versions of this traditional draft beer may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for draft versions.
b) Scottish Heavy Ale Malty. Low fruit esters OK. Diacetyl and sulpheriness acceptable if very low. May have faint smoke. Golden-amber to deep brown. May have chill haze. Rounded flavor profile, malty, low but perceptable hop bitterness. May have faint smoke. Soft and chewy, with medium body. Moderate in strength.
10-19 SRM 12-20 IBU OG 1.035-40
Characterized by a rounded flavor profile, Scottish ales are malty, caramellike, soft and chewy. Dominated by a smooth, sweet maltiness balanced with low, but perceptible, hop bitterness. Yeast characters such as diacetyl (butterscotch) and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. Fruity esters are very low, if evident. May possess a faint smoky character. Bottled versions of this traditional draft beer may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for draft versions.
c) Scottish Export Ale Malty, may have faint smoke. Fruity-ester character may be apparent. Diacetyl (butterscotch) and sulfuriness acceptable at very low levels. Hops absent or barely perceptable. Golden-amber to deep brown, Chill haze is acceptable. Malty, caramellike, bitterness low to medium. May posess faint smoke. Soft and chewy, medium body.
10-19 SRM 15-25 IBU OG 1.040-50
Characterized by a rounded flavor profile, malty, sweet, caramellike, soft and chewy. Diacetyl (butterscotch) and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. Bottled versions of this traditional draft beer may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for draft versions.

4) Brown and Mild Ales
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) English Light Mild Hop aroma can be light. Very low diacetyl may be appropriate. Fruity ester level is very low. Light amber to light brown. Chill haze is allowable. Malty, with little hop bitterness or flavor. Very low diacetyl flavors may be appropriate. Light, but robust for its low alchahol.
8-17 SRM 10-24 IBU OG 1.030-38
Malty sweet tones dominate the flavor profile with little hop bitterness or flavor. This beer should be flavorful in spite of the low alchahol content.
b) English Dark Mild Fruity-ester level is very low. Very little hop aroma. Rosted maltiness should dominate. Very low diacetyl may be appropriate. Deep copper to dark brown (often with a red tint). Malty sweet, caramel. Very little hop flavor. Rosted maltiness should dominate. Very low diacetyl may be appropriate. Light, but robust for its low alchahol.
17-34 SRM 10-24 IBU OG 1.030-38
Malty sweet, caramel, licorice and roast malt tones dominate the flavor and aroma profile with very little hop flavor or aroma.
c) English Brown Malty, very little hop aroma. Fruity-esters are appropriate. Diacetyl should be very low, if evident. Deep copper to brown. Chill haze is allowable. Maltiness dominates, with very little hop flavor. Fruity-ester flavors are appropriate. Diacetyl should be very low, if evident. Medium
15-22 SRM 15-25 IBU OG 1.040-50
Dry to sweet maltiness dominates with very little hop flavor or aroma. Fruity-ester flavors are appropriate. Diacetyl should be very low, if evident.
d) American Brown Evident hop aroma. Estery and fruity-ester characters subdued, diacetyl should not be perceived. Deep copper to brown. Chill haze is allowable. Malty, but with increased bitterness. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Medium
15-22 SRM 25-60 IBU OG 1.040-55
Evident hop aroma and increased bitterness. Estery and fruity-ester characters should be subdued, and diacetyl should not be perceived.

5) Traditional English Ale
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Classic English Pale Ale
4-11 SRM 20-40 IBU OG 1.044-56
Golden- to copper-colored and displays English-variety hop character. High hop bitterness, flavor and aroma should be evident. This medium-bodied pale ale has low to medium maltiness. Low caramel is allowable. Fruity-ester flavors and aromas are moderate to strong. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Diacetyl (butterscotch character) should be at very low levels or not perceived.
b) English Ordinary Bitter
8-12 SRM 20-35 IBU OG 1.033-38
Gold- to copper-colored with medium bitterness. Light to medium body and low to medium residual malt sweetness. Good hop character and mild carbonation traditionally characterize draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Diacetyl and fruity-ester properties are acceptable, but should be minimized in this form of bitter. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.
c) English Best (Special) Bitter
Golden to copper in color, and more robust than ordinary bitter. Fairly well attenuated with medium body and medium residual sweetness. Good hop character and mild carbonation traditionally characterize draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. The special bitter has more hop character than ordinary bitter. Fruity-ester character and very low diacetyl (butterscotch) character are acceptable in aroma and flavor. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.
12-14 SRM 28-46 IBU OG 1.038-45

6) American Pale Ale
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) American Pale Ale
4-11 SRM 20-40 IBU OG 1.044-56
Range from golden to light copper color. The style is characterized by American-variety hops used to produce high hop bitterness, flavor and aroma. American pale ales have medium body and low to medium maltiness. Low caramel character is allowable. Fruity-ester flavor and aroma should be moderate to strong. Diacetyl should be absent or present at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

7) Porter
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Robust Porter
25-35+ SRM 25-40 IBU OG 1.040-58
A medium to full body in a balanced beer that has a noticeably coffee-like dryness, and may have a malty sweet flavor that comes through in the finish. Chocolate and black malts add a sharp bitterness, but do so without adding roasted or charcoal notes. There can be a little roast barley character or none at all. Hop bitterness is medium to high. Hop flavor and aroma is none to medium. Fruitiness, esters and low diacetyl are OK. The color is deep brown with red hues to black.

Commercial examples: Anchor Porter, Sierra Nevada Porter, Black Hook Porter.

b) Brown Porter
20-35 SRM 20-30 IBU OG 1.040-50
A bit lighter than the robust, with light to medium body and generally lower in alcohol. The malt sweetness is low to medium and well-balanced with the medium hop bitterness. No strong roast barley or burnt malt character. Color is medium to dark brown with reddish tones. None to medium hop aroma and flavor. Fruitiness, esters and low diacetyl are OK.

Commercial examples: Samuel Smith's Taddy Porter, Young's London Porter, Yuengling Porter, Stegmeter Porter, Pickwick's Porter, Essex Porter, Burton Porter, Pimlico Porter, Catamount Porter, Whitbread Porter.

8) Traditional Stout
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Classic Irish-Style Dry Stout
40+ SRM 30-40 IBU OG 1.038-48
Dry stouts have an initial malt and caramel flavor profile with a distinctive dry-roasted bitterness in the finish. Dry stouts achieve a dry-roasted character through the use of roasted barley. Some slight acidity may be perceived, but is not necessary. Hop aroma and flavor should not be perceived. Dry stouts have medium body. Fruity esters are minimal and overshadowed by malt, hop bitterness and roasted barley character. Diacetyl (butterscotch) should be very low or not perceived. Head retention and rich character should be part of its visual character.
b) Foreign-Style Stout
40+ SRM 30-60 IBU OG 1.052-72
Foreign-style stouts have an initial malt sweetness and caramel flavor with a distinctive dry-roasted bitterness in the finish. Some slight acidity is permissible and a medium- to full-bodied mouthfeel is appropriate. Hop aroma and flavor should not be perceived. The perception of fruity esters is low. Diacetyl (butterscotch) should be negligible or not perceived. Head retention is excellent.

9) Robust Stout
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Sweet Stout
40+ SRM 15-25 IBU OG 1.045-56
Sweet stouts, also referred as to cream stouts, have less roasted bitter flavor and more full-bodied mouthfeel than dry stouts. The style can be given more body with milk sugar (lactose) before bottling. Malt sweetness, chocolate and caramel flavor should dominate the flavor profile. Hops should balance sweetness without contributing apparent flavor or aroma.
b) Oatmeal Stout
20+ SRM 20-40 IBU OG 1.038-56
Oatmeal stouts typically include oatmeal in their grist, resulting in a pleasant, full flavor and smooth profile that is rich without being grainy. Roasted malt character of caramel and chocolate should be evident, smooth and not bitter. Bitterness is moderate -- not high. Hop flavor and aroma are optional, but should not overpower the overall balance. This is a medium- to full-bodied beer with minimal fruity esters.
c) Imperial Stout
20+ SRM 50-80 IBU OG 1.075-90
Dark copper to very black, imperial stouts typically have alcohol contents exceeding 8 percent. The extremely rich malty flavor and aroma is balanced with assertive hopping and fruity-ester characteristics. Perceived bitterness can be moderate, balanced with malt character, to very high in the darker versions. Roasted malt astringency and bitterness can be perceived moderately, but should not overwhelm the overall character. Hop aroma can be subtle to overwhelmingly floral. Diacetyl (butterscotch) levels should be very low.

10) American Micro Standards
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) American Wheat
2-8 SRM 5-17 IBU OG 1.030-50
This beer can be made using either an ale or lager yeast. Brewed with 30 to 50 percent wheat. Hop rates are higher, and carbonation is lower than German-style wheat beers. A fruity-estery aroma and flavor is typical, but at low levels; however, phenolic, clovelike characteristics should not be perceived. Color is usually golden to light amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should be at very low levels.
b) Blonde Ale
4-7 SRM 15-33 IBU OG 1.045-60
It has an apparent light to medium malt aroma and flavor but should not have a syrupy flavor. They are usually balanced with light to medium hop bitterness though the accent should remain with the malt. The bitterness may come out more in the aftertaste creating a very dry sensation. Hop aroma may be medium to non-existent.

This is the type of Golden Ale being brewed by the microbreweries and brewpubs. It is usually an all-malt brew. It is likely to have a pleasant hop bouquet, a soft, lightly malty palate, and some fruitiness. There are a few versions of this style with very restrained use of hops, making the beer sweet in character. Fruitiness may be light to medium. Light diacetyl and DMS is OK.

Commercial examples: Sea Dog Windjammer, Mill City Spring Fever Blonde Ale, Catamount Gold, Goose Island Blonde Ale.

c) Amber Ale Hop aroma moderate to intense. Malty, and clean. Light red to deep copper, up to just short of brown Balanced to hoppy, malt is very evident. Some caramel to mildly toasted malt flavor. Medium, with a dry finish
25-40 IBU OG 1.045-60
This emerging style, sometimes referred to as red ale, is currently heading in two directions. One emphasizes balance and smoothness, where the other leans more toward an aggressive American hop flavor. At this time, both types should be considered acceptable. Both styles emphasize maltiness, and even hoppy versions are balanced by malt. Malt flavor should be dominated by caramel-crystal notes and/or munich spicey-roasty flavors. These beers should be all malt, so any adjunct flavors should be considered a flaw. Base malts should be relatively neutral without the typically Brittish biscuit flavor. A great Amber ale should be smooth, balanced, and quaffable. American hop flavors and aroma can be intense in the more bitter, (often dry-hopped) versions.

Commercial examples: Mendocino's Red Tail Ale (Balanced), Big Time's Atlas Amber (Balanced),Rogue St. Red (Hoppy);
Alaskan Autumn Ale (Alaskan Brewing), Capstone ESB (Oasis Brewery), DeLaveaga Red Ale (Seabright Brewing), Red Nectar (Humbolt Brewing), Red Seal Ale (North Coast Brewing), Seabright Amber Ale (Seabright Brewing)


Lagers


11) American Standards
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) American Lager
2-4 SRM 5-17 IBU OG 1.040-46
Very light in body and color, American lagers are very clean and crisp and aggressively carbonated. Malt sweetness is absent. Corn, rice or other grain or sugar adjuncts are often used. Hop aroma is absent. Hop bitterness is slight, and hop flavor is mild or negligible. Chill haze, fruity esters and diacetyl should be absent.
b) American Style Light Lager
2-4 SRM 8-15 IBU OG 1.024-40
According to Food and Drug Administration regulations, when used in reference to caloric content, "light" beers must have at least 25 percent fewer calories than the "regular" version of that beer. These beers are extremely light colored, light in body and high in carbonation. Flavor is mild and bitterness is very low. Chill haze, fruity esters and diacetyl should be absent.
c) American Lager/Ale or Cream Ale
2-5 SRM 10-22 IBU OG 1.044-56
This mild, pale, light-bodied ale is made using a warm fermentation (top or bottom) and cold lagering or by blending top- and bottom-fermented beers. Hop bitterness and flavor are very low. Hop aroma is often absent. Sometimes referred to as cream ales, these beers are crisp and refreshing. A fruity or estery aroma may be perceived. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.
d) American Style Premium Lager
2-8 SRM 13-23 IBU OG 1.046-50
Similar to the American lager, this style is a more flavorful, medium-bodied beer and may contain few or no adjuncts. Color may be deeper than the American lager, and alcohol content and bitterness may be greater. Hop aroma and flavor are low or negligible. Chill haze, fruity esters and diacetyl should be absent.
e) Dry Lager
2-4 SRM 15-23 IBU OG 1.040-50
This straw-colored lager lacks sweetness and is reminiscent of an American-style light lager. However, its starting gravity and alcoholic strength are greater. Hop rates are low and carbonation is high. Chill haze, fruity esters and diacetyl should be absent.
f) Malt Liquor
1-8 SRM 5-22 IBU OG 1.048-64
Roughly similar to other American lagers but higher in alcohol. Usually very pale in color although some amber colored versions do exist. Light to no hop bitterness, flavor and/or aroma. Light DMS flavor and aroma should be apparent but not overpowering.

The name "malt liquor" is a designation based on the fact that these brews quite often exceed the legal alcohol level defined for beers by some states.

Commercial examples: Molson Brador, Colt 45.

g) American Dark Lager
10-20 SRM 14-20 IBU OG 1.040-50
This beer's maltiness is less pronounced, and its body is light. Non-malt adjuncts often are used, and hop rates are low. Hop bitterness flavor and aroma are low. Carbonation is high and more typical of an American-style light lager than a European dark lager. Fruity esters, diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.

12) Bock
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Traditional Bock
20-30 SRM 20-30 IBU OG 1.066-74
Traditional bocks are made with all malt and are strong, malty, medium- to full-bodied, bottom-fermented beers with moderate hop bitterness that should increase proportionately with the starting gravity. Hop flavor should be low, and hop aroma should be very low. Bocks can range in color from deep copper to dark brown. Fruity esters may be perceived at low levels.
b) German Style Helles Bock Maibock
4-10 SRM 20-35 IBU OG 1.066-68
The German word "helles" means light colored, and, as such, a helles bock is light in color. Maibocks also are light-colored bocks. The malty character should come through in the aroma and flavor. Body is medium to full. Hop bitterness should be low while "noble-type" hop aroma and flavor may be at low to medium levels. Bitterness increases with gravity. Fruity esters should be minimal. Diacetyl levels should be very low. Chill haze should not be perceived.
c) Doppelbock
12-30 SRM 17-27 IBU OG 1.074-80
Malty sweetness is dominant, but should not be cloying. Doppelbocks are full-bodied and deep amber to dark brown color. Astringency from roasted malts is absent. Alcoholic strength is high, and hop rates increase with gravity. Hop bitterness and flavor should be low and hop aroma absent. Fruity esters are commonly perceived, but at low to moderate levels.
d) Eisbock
18-50 SRM 26-33 IBU OG 1.092-116
Deep copper to black. Very alcoholic. Aroma and flavor profile is similar to doppelbock. Traditionally brewed by freezing a doppelbock and removing the resulting ice to concentrate the beer and increase the alcohol content.

13) Munich and Dortmund Lagers
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Munich Dunkel
17-20 SRM 16-25 IBU OG 1.052-56
These beers have a pronounced malty aroma and flavor that dominates over the clean, crisp moderate hop bitterness. A classic Muenchner dunkel should have a chocolatelike, roasted malt, breadlike aroma that comes from the use of Munich dark malt. Chocolate or roast malts can be used, but the percentage should be minimal. "Noble-type" hop flavor and aroma should be low, but perceptible. Diacetyl is acceptable at very low levels. Fruity esters and chill haze should not be perceived.
b) Muenchner Style Helles
3-5 SRM 18-25 IBU OG 1.044-50
This beer has a relatively low bitterness. It is a medium-bodied malt-emphasized beer, however certain versions can approach a balance of hop character and maltiness. There should not be any caramel character. Color is light straw to golden. Fruity esters and diacetyl should not be perceived.
c) Dortmunder or European Style Export
3-5 SRM 23-29 IBU OG 1.048-56
Both starting gravity and medium bitterness are somewhat higher than a Muenchner helles. Hop flavor and aroma are perceptible, but low. The color of this style may be slightly darker, and the body will be more full, but still medium-bodied. Fruity esters, chill haze and diacetyl should not be perceived.

14) Pilsener
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) German Pilsener
3-4 SRM 30-40 IBU OG 1.044-50
A classic German Pilsener is very light straw/golden color and well hopped. Hop bitterness is high. Hop aroma and flavor are moderate and quite obvious. It is a well-attenuated and medium-bodied beer but a malty accent can be perceived. Fruity esters and diacetyl should not be perceived. There should be no chill haze. The head should be dense and rich.
b) Bohemian Pilsener
3-5 SRM 35-45 IBU OG 1.044-56
Pilseners in this subcategory are similar to German Pilseners, however they are slightly more full-bodied and can be as dark as light amber. This style balances moderate bitterness, and "noble-type" hop aroma and flavor with a malty, slightly sweet medium body. Diacetyl may be perceived in very low amounts. There should be no chill haze. The head should be dense and rich.

15) Vienna and Märzen Oktoberfest
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Vienna
8-12 SRM 22-28 IBU OG 1.048-56
Beers in this category are reddish-brown or copper colored. They are light to medium in body. The beer is characterized by malty aroma, slight malt sweetness and clean hop bitterness. "Noble-type" hop aromas and flavors should be low to medium. Fruity esters, diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.
b) Märzen Oktoberfest
4-15 SRM 18-25 IBU OG 1.050-56
Märzens are characterized by a medium body and broad range of color. Oktoberfests can range from golden to reddish-brown. Sweet maltiness should dominate slightly over a clean, hop bitterness. Malt character should be toasted rather than strongly caramel. Hop aroma and flavor should be low but notable. Fruity esters are minimal, if perceived at all. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.


Specialty Beers


16) Mixed Ale-Lager Styles
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Kölsch
3.5-5 SRM 20-30 IBU OG 1.042-46
Kölsch is warm-fermented and aged at cold temperatures (German ale or alt-style beer). Kölsch is characterized by a golden color and a slightly dry, winy and subtly sweet palate. Caramel character should not be evident. The body is light. This beer has low hop flavor and aroma with medium bitterness. Wheat can be used in brewing this beer which is fermented using ale or lager yeasts. Fruity esters should be minimally perceived, if at all. Chill haze should be absent or minimal.
b) Düsseldorf Style Altbier
11-19 SRM 25-48 IBU OG 1.044-48
Copper to brown in color, this German ale may be highly hopped (though the 25 to 35 IBU range is more normal for the majority of altbiers from Düsseldorf) and has a medium body and malty flavor. A variety of malts, including wheat, may be used. Hop character may be evident in the flavor. The overall impression is clean, crisp and flavorful. Fruity esters should be low. No diacetyl or chill haze should be perceived.
c) California Common Beer
8-17 SRM 35-45 IBU OG 1.040-55
Light amber to copper. Medium body. Toasted or caramellike maltiness in aroma and flavor. Medium to high hop bitterness. Hop flavor medium to high. Aroma medium. Fruitiness and esters low. Low diacetyl OK. Uses lager yeast. Fermented at warm temperatures, but aged at cold temperatures.

17) German Wheat Beers
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Weizen/Weissbier
3-9 SRM 10-15 IBU OG 1.046-56
The aroma and flavor of a weissbier is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove or nutmeg and can be smoky or even vanillalike. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat, and hop rates are quite low. Weissbier is well-attenuated and very highly carbonated, yet its relatively high starting gravity and alcohol content make it a medium to full-bodied beer. Bananalike esters are often present. If yeast is present, the beer will appropriately have yeast flavor and a characteristically fuller mouthfeel. No diacetyl should be perceived.
b) Dunkelweizen
16-23 SRM 10-15 IBU OG 1.048-56
This beer style is characterized by a distinct sweet maltiness, and roasted malt and chocolatelike character, but the estery and phenolic elements of a pale weissbier still prevail. Color can range from copper-brown to dark brown. Carbonation and hop bitterness are similar to a pale South-German-style weissbier. Usually dark barley malts are used in conjunction with dark cara or color malts, and the percentage of wheat malt is at least 50 percent. No diacetyl should be perceived.
c) Weizenbock
5-30 SRM 10-15 IBU OG 1.066-80
This style can be either pale or dark and, like a bottom-fermented bock, has a high starting gravity and alcohol content. The malty sweetness of a weizenbock is balanced with a clovelike phenolic and fruity-estery banana element to produce a well-rounded aroma and flavor. As is true with all German wheat beers, hop rates are low, and carbonation is high. It has a medium to full body. If dark, a mild roast malt character should emerge in flavor and, to a lesser degree, in the aroma. No diacetyl should be perceived.

18) Belgian and French Ales
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Belgian Abbey Double
10-14 SRM 18-25 IBU OG 1.060-70
Dark amber to brown. Sweet malty aroma. Faint hop aroma ok. Medium to full body. Malty, plum-like flavor. Very low bitterness, no hop flavor. Medium to high carbonation. Low to medieum esters. No roasted flavors or diacetyl.

Doubles should be malty and sweet with a noticeable plum character. Modest alcohol flavor is ok, as are low levels of esters, but the malt flavors should predominate. Doubles are usually lighter in body than their maltiness would suggest, with a fairly moussy carbonation that produces a very nice head.

Commercial examples: Westmalle Dubbel (6.5% ABV), Affligem Double (7% ABV), Grimbergen Double (6.2% ABV), Steenbrugge Double (6.5% ABV).

b) Triple
3.5-5.5 SRM 18-25 IBU OG 1.080-96
Light or pale color. Low ester, malt or hop aroma ok. Low hop bitterness or flavor ok. Malt sweetness in flavor ok. Low esters ok. Medium to full body. High carbonation. No diacetyl. Strength should be evident; alcohol flavor ok.

This is a strong, very pale beer with a relatively neutral character, by Belgian standards. These beers should have low esters (by Belgian standards), and comparatively light body and flavor for their strength. Frequently they are slightly sweet. Alcoholic strength should be evident, followed by a subtle mix of yeast products and hop and malt flavors. Some commercial examples are well hopped, but most are not. Some spicy (phenol) character is ok. High carbonation levels are the norm.

Commercial examples: Brugse Tripel (9.5% ABV), Affligem Tripel (9% ABV), Grimbergen Tripel (8.13% ABV), Steenbrugge Tripel (9% ABV).

c) Belgian Ale
3.5-12 SRM 20-30 IBU OG 1.044-54
Pale to brown. Bitterness, hop flavor and aroma should be noticeable, with noble or classic types preferred. Low to medium esters. Low malt aroma, restrained caramel or toasted malt flavor ok. Medium body. No diacetyl or alcohol flavors. Medium carbonation.

An easily drinkable everyday beer. These are generally beers of standard strength that combine subtle Belgian-tasting yeast flavors with noticeable hop character that is frequently pilsner-like, leaving a pleasant lingering bitterness in the aftertaste. Subtlety, finesse and balance are the most important factors.

Commercial examples: Rubens Blond, Celis Pale Bock.

d) Belgian Strong Ale
3.5-20 SRM 16-30 IBU OG 1.064-1.120
Pale to dark brown. Low hop bitterness and aroma ok, should blend with other flavors. Medium to high esters in flavor and aroma. Phenols ok. Often highly aromatic. Spices or orange ok. Strength evident, but alcohol flavor subdued or absent. Medium to full body, sometimes with a high terminal gravity. Medium to high carbonation. No roasted flavors or diacetyl.

Should be formulated to show off yeast character, with all other ingredients playing a supporting role. The flavor may be subtly complex, but should not be crowded. Body is comparatively light for beers of this strength, due to use of brewing adjuncts or of pilsner malt only. High carbonation also helps; these beers should feel like mousse on the palate and have an impressive head. The best examples may be noticeably strong but still have no alcohol flavor. Flemish examples tend toward higher terminal gravities (1.025-1.050). Trappist strong ale and Saison clones should be should be submitted in this category.

Commercial examples: Corsendonk blond (8% ABV), Corsendonk brown (8% ABV), Saison Dupont (6.5% ABV), Gouden Carolus (7% ABV), Scaldis (12% ABV), Duvel (8.5% ABV), Brigand (9% ABV), Oerbier (7.5% ABV), Arabier (8% ABV), Bos Keun (7% ABV), Stille Nacht (8% ABV), Pauwel Kwak (8% ABV), Celis Grand Cru.

e) Bière de Garde
8-12 SRM 25-30 IBU OG 1.060-80
Deep golden to deep copper/light brown. Medium to high malt flavor. Light to medium body. Medium hop bitterness. Light to medium hop flavor and aroma. May have light to medium fruitiness, esteriness. Lager yeast may be used. Earthy, cellarlike, musty aromas OK. Traditionally, a French-style beer that improves with some aging.
f) Saison
3.5-10 SRM 20-40 IBU OG 1.048-80
Brewed in France and Belgium during the spring for the summer. It is often only 50% attenuated (fermented). Fermentation is inhibited by the use of multiple strains of yeast that work quickly but not thoroughly. Hard water may have helped provide the body, mouth-feel and extraction of flavors from the grains. Brewed predominantly from pale malt, gaining color through a lengthy boil. Sometimes a small portion of spelt (a variety of wheat) , or raw oats or raw rice was used. Fruity with a pungent sourness and hop aroma, they are often dry-hopped. Low malt aroma. The style is crisp, tart, and refreshing. Distinctively bitter but not assertive. Bottled-conditioned with additional yeast added to the bottle. The profile includes a thick, dense, rocky head on a fairly well-carbonated beer with a palate of some tart, citric notes. Light to medium body. Slight acidity and low diacetyl are OK.

Commercial examples: Saison Dupont, Saison Silly, Saison Enghien, Saison Regal, Saison de Pipaix, Saison 1900.

19) Sour Beers
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Oud Bruin
Flanders Brown/Red
10-20 SRM 15-25 IBU OG 1.044-60
Red, deep copper or deep brown with red tints. Acidic aroma with some fruitiness. Flavor sweet, sour and fruity, esp. cherry-like with some caramel malt character. Lactic, acetic and oak flavors ok. Attenuation low to medium. Medium carbonation, body medium to full. Low bitterness, no hop flavor or aroma. No diacetyl.

Richly colored with a fruity, acidic aroma and an intensely fruity, sweet and sour palate. Sourness varies in commercial examples, many of which are filtered and sweetened. Color and body should come mostly from caramel malts.

Commercial examples: Liefmans Goudenband (5.1% ABV), Rodenbach Grand Cru (6.5% ABV).

b) Oud Bruin (with fruit)
Flanders Brown/Red
10-20 SRM 15-25 IBU OG 1.044-60
Like the standard Oud Bruin, with addition of raspberries, cherries or other fruit. Fruit character should be clearly defined and prominent but blend well with other flavors. Fruit may provide additional acidity. Commercial examples: Liefmans Framboise (5.7% ABV), Liefmans Kriek.
c) Wit
2-4 SRM 15-22 IBU OG 1.044-55
Yellow/gold, cloudy when chilled. Coriander flavor and mild acidity essential, but flavors must be well blended. Wheat and bitter orange peel flavors desirable. Mild hop flavor and aroma ok. Low to medium bitterness and esters. Low to medium body, medium or higher carbonation. No diacetyl.

These beers should be average in gravity with a hazy yellow color and a dense, dazzling white head. May or may not have a slightly orangey aroma (due primarily to the coriander), or mild hop aroma (preferably floral rather than spicy). Body should be medium or a bit lighter, and the carbonation should be reasonably aggressive. Bitterness should be low, mild acidity is essential, no alcohol flavor. Esters are ok, but shouldn't predominate. Should be very drinkable.

Commercial examples: Celis White (4.7% ABV, 50% raw wheat, 50% malted barley), Riva Blanche (5% ABV, sold as Dentergems in Belgium), Blanche de Bruges, Blanche des Neiges.

d) pLambic and pGueue
6-15 SRM 12-16 IBU OG 1.044-56
Clean sourness. No hop bitterness, flavor or aroma. Very low carbonation for lambics, high carbonation for gueuze. Light body and high attenuation. Brettanomyces and lactic character predominate in aroma and flavor. Mild enteric and acetic flavors ok. Cloudiness ok. Pale, dry. No diacetyl, alcohol or rancid flavors.

Lambic is unblended and has gone flat due to ageing (up to 3 years). Gueuze is a blend of old and young lambic, and is carbonated. Gueuze is similar to champagne in body and head: very high carbonation contriburtes to light body, as does wheat content. May or may not have ahead. Color varies from straw to fruit-colored. Often dry and quite sour with prominent brettanomyces character in both palate and aroma, including aromas like horse blanket, straw, sweat, barn, and enteric. Some sourness usually detectable in aroma. Should taste bright, not spoiled or rotten.

Commercial examples: Cantillon gueuze (5% ABV), Boon gueuze. Filtered, sweetened versions include Lindeman's gueuze and Gueuze St. Louis.

e) pLambic (with fruit)
15-21 IBU OG 1.040-72
As pLambic, usually carbonated. Should have noticeable color from fruit adjunct. May or may not have fruit aroma. Intensity of fruit flavor varies, but a lingering, pleasant fruitiness is an asset. Brett and sourness should still be very noticeable. Often very dry. No alcohol flavor.

Commercial examples: Cantillon kriek, Cantillon Rose deGambrinus, Boon kriek, Boon Marriage Parfait, Boon 1986 framboise (6.2% ABV). Filtered, sweetened versions include Lindemans Framboise, Kriek and Peche.

f) Berliner Weisse
2-4 SRM 3-6 IBU OG 1.028-32
This is the lightest of all the German wheat beers. The unique combination of a yeast and lactic acid bacteria fermentation yields a beer that is acidic, highly attenuated and very light-bodied. The carbonation of a Berliner weisse is high and hop rates are very low. Hop character should not be perceived. Fruity esters are evident. No diacetyl should be perceived.

20) Smoked and Schwarzbier
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Bamberg Style Rauchbier
10-20 SRM 20-30 IBU OG 1.048-52
Rauchbier should have smoky characters prevalent in the aroma and flavor. The beer is generally toasted malty sweet and full bodied with low to medium hop bitterness. "Noble-type" hop flavor is low, but perceptible. Low "noble-type" hop aroma is optional. The aroma should strike a balance between malt, hop and smoke. Fruity esters, diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.
b) Classic Style Smoked Beer refer to individual classic styles
Any classic style of beer can be smoked. The goal is to reach a balance between the style's character and the smoky properties.
c) Other Smoked Beer Open to interpretation
Any beer to which smoke flavors have been added.
d) Schwarzbier
25-30 SRM 22-30 IBU OG 1.044-52
Dark brown to black. Medium body. Roasted malt evident. Low sweetness in aroma and flavor. Low to medium bitterness. Low bitterness from roast malt. Hop flavor and aroma, "noble-type" OK. No fruitiness, esters. Low diacetyl OK.

21) Fruit and Vegetable Beer
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Fruit and Vegetable Beer
5-50 SRM 5-70 IBU OG 1.030-110
Any beers using fruits or vegetables as an adjunct in either primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious, yet harmonious, fruit and vegetable qualities. Fruit and vegetable qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. If a fruit or vegetable (such as juniper berry or chili pepper) has an herbal or spice quality, it is more appropriate to enter it in the Herb and Spice Beer category.

Brewer to specify lager/ale and fruit type

b) Classic-Style Fruit and Vegetable Beer refer to individual classic styles
Any classic-style beer using fruits or vegetables as part of the flavor profile and providing obvious, yet harmonious, fruit and vegetable qualities.

Brewer to specify classic style and fruit type

22) Herb and Spice Beer
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Herb and Spice Beer
5-50 SRM 5-70 IBU OG 1.030-110
Use of herbs or spices (derived from roots, seeds, fruits, vegetables, flowers, etc.) other than hops to create a distinct character. Under-hopping allows the spice or herb to contribute to the flavor profile.

Brewer to specify Lager/Ale and spices used.

b) Classic-Style Herb and Spice Beer Brewer to specify classic style and spices used.

refer to individual classic styles

Any classic-style beer using herbs or spices as part of the flavor profile and providing obvious, yet harmonious, herb and spice flavor.

23) Specialty (Misc.), and Chili Beer
Aroma Appearance Flavor Body
a) Specialty Beer
1-100 SRM 0-100 IBU OG 1.030-110
Any ale or lager brewed using unusual techniques and/or ingredients other than (or in addition to) malted barley as a unique contribution to the overall character of the beer. Examples of specialty beers include (but are not limited to) beers brewed with honey, maple sap or syrup; worts heated with white-hot stones (Steinbier); and low- or non-alcoholic beers. Examples do not include the use of fruit or herbs, although they can be used to add to the character of other ingredients.

Brewer to specify special ingredients or techniques.

b) Classic Style Specialty Beer Brewer to specify classic style and special ingredients or techniques.

refer to individual classic styles

Any classic ale or lager to which special ingredients have been added or a special process has been used. For example, honey Pilsener, maple porter, sorghum stout, pumpkin pale ale, worts heated with white-hot stones (Steinbier), and low- or non-alcoholic beers. Examples do not include the use of fruit or herbs, although they can be used to add to the character of other ingredients.
c) Chili Beer
2-15 SRM 15-30 IBU OG 1.030-65
These beers are generally pale, but can range into the red or amber regions. Flavor and aroma should accentuate malt and chili. Hop rates should be low in both bitterness and flavor. A chili beer should seek a pleasant sweet malt / hot chili balance. The balance can range from neutral to distinctly but not overpoweringly hot.

Brewer to specify ale/lager and intensity of hot flavor (mild, hot, very hot).


Mead

On all meads, the brewer should indicate all four of the following modifiers
Variety of honey Clover, Alfalfa, Orange Blossom, Mesquite, Wildflower...
Strength Hydromel, OG of less than 1.080; Standard, OG between 1.080 and 1.120; Sack, OG greater than 1.120
Sweetness Dry, FG less than 1.010; Medium, FG between 1.010 and 1.025; Sweet, FG greater than 1.025
Carbonation Level Still, slight effervescence is acceptable.
Sparkling, Strong effervescence and tingly mouthfeel. Tiny bubbles are prefered.


M1
Traditional Mead - A mead made primarily from honey, water and yeast. Honey should be expressed in aroma and flavor. Additives of any type are allowed at sub-threshold levels (spice or fruit character is considered a flaw). The mead should have a neutral acidity-sweetness-tannin balance.

M2
Melomel - A mead made with fruit. The fruit should be expressed in the aroma, the taste and the color of the mead (see subcategories for exceptions). Honey should be expressed in aroma and flavor. There should be a good balance between the honey and the fruit character in both the aroma and taste.

Brewer to specify type of fruit :

  • Cyser (Apple Melomel) - should have distinct apple character in aroma and taste. Color should be straw to golden.
  • Pyment (Grape Melomel, also spelled Pymeat) - may be either straw to golden color or have a pink to purple cast. The mead should have a definite grape wine character, but should also have a balanced honey character. Grassy white wine character or buttery (diacetal) chardonnay character is appropriate in pyment (or hippocras) only.
  • Raspberry Melomel - should have a distinct and intense raspberry flavor. Raspberry tartness and tannin should be balanced by honey sweetness. Honey flavor and aroma should still come through. The mead should have a deep red-purple color.
  • Cherry Melomel - should have a deep reddish brown color. Cherry flavor (either cherry pie or sour cherry) and aroma should come through strongly, but be balanced by the honey character. Many people have a knee-jerk distaste for real cherry flavor due to cherry-flavored medicines taken as a child; judges should either overcome their prejudice or refrain from judging cherry melomels. Some almond character from the cherry pits is okay and can be a plus. This melomel may range from a light cherry hydromel to a heavy, sherry-like after dinner drink. Some oxidation may be appropriate to give this mead a sherry or port character.
  • Plum Melomel - has many similarities to cherry melomel. The mead should have a deep purple to reddish brown color. Plum character should be apparent in both the aroma and taste, balanced with the honey character. Some oxidation may be appropriate to give this mead a sherry or port character.
  • Peach Melomel - should have fresh peach taste, like biting into a peach. Instead of having a fruit-honey balance, peach melomels are unique in that the peach taste blends with the honey taste, giving a whole greater than the sum of the parts. Slight cloying quality okay. Color should be a pinkish golden.
  • Apricot Melomel - should have a pink-orange tint. Apricot taste and aroma should be strong, with an accompanying strong honey character. The acid-sweetness balance in this mead is particularly hard to attain, as apricots tend to be very acidic.
  • Strawberry Melomel - should have fresh strawberry aroma. May not have any discernible strawberry color. Strawberry taste may be delicate. Good examples will have a definite strawberry character in the aroma and taste, but will probably be delicate meads in order to be balanced.
  • Blueberry Melomel - may not have any discernible blueberry color. Blueberry taste may be delicate. Good examples will have a definite blueberry character in the aroma and taste, but will probably be delicate meads in order to be balanced.
  • Berry Melomel - may be Boysenberry Melomel, Marion Berry Melomel, Morat (Mulberry Melomel), Blackberry Melomel, Cranberry Melomel, Elderberry Melomel or others. Most berry melomels will have a distinct reddish to purple color. Berry flavor and aroma should be present and balance with honey character. Berry melomels have a tendency to be overly tannic; a good tannin-sweetness balance is desired.
  • Citrus Melomel - may be more acidic (tarter) than other melomels, but should still have a good acid/sweet balance. The melomel may be made with orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit, tangerine or other citrus fruits. Little or no expression of fruit in the color. Citrus character may be hard to discern unless compared against a traditional mead. Honey character will probably dominate, but citrus should still come through.
  • Tropical Fruit Melomel - may include papaya, mango, kiwi, guava, pomegranate or other tropical fruits. Should express fruit character, but may be difficult to judge due to less familiarity with the fruit tastes. Color may be straw (kiwi) to orange golden (mango, papaya, guava) to purplish (pomegranate). Fruit may be expressed as an enhanced fruitiness blended with the honey flavor.
  • Prickly Pear Mead - should have a deep golden color. Prickly pear will be expressed as a dry, dusty or powdery taste, overlaid on a sweet background. Honey should be prominent and accentuated by the prickly pear.
  • Other - see general melomel description.

M3
Metheglin - A mead made with spices or herbs. The spices should be expressed in the aroma and flavor of the mead, but usually won't appear in the color. Honey character should be apparent in the aroma and flavor. There should be a good honey-spice balance in the mead. Metheglins containing more than one spice should also have a good balance between the different spices. Often, a blend of spices may give a character greater than the sum of its parts.

Brewer to specify spices :

  • Mulling Spice Metheglin - may contain Allspice, Cinnamon, Cloves, Ginger, Nutmeg, Citrus Rind, Mace or other mulling spices. Most metheglins in this subcategory will contain a blend of these spices. If several spices are used, spices should blend together. A common problem is overdoing the ginger, as it tends to dominate. Honey should be very noticeable and should blend well with these spices.
  • Beer Spice Metheglin - may contain Coriander, Cardamom, Curacao Orange Peel, Woodruff or other spices often associated with beers. Spices should be evident and balanced with honey character. May be reminiscent of a Wit Beer or Berliner Weisse. The mead will probably be light in order not to overwhelm the delicate spices.
  • Mellow Spice Metheglin - may contain Vanilla Bean, Chocolate, Anise, Maple Syrup, Sassafras Root or other mellow or rounded tasting spices. These spices all have smooth tastes, in contrast to the more piquant spices in the other subcategories. The flavor of the spices may blend with that of the honey more than be balanced with it. Acidity-sweetness balance may be particularly important, as these metheglins will have a tendency to be cloying. Some cloying character is acceptable. Anise has a flavor similar to licorice.
  • Italian Spice Metheglin - may contain Oregano, Basil, Thyme, Bay Leaves, Sage, Rosemary, Garlic or other Italian spices. Think of this metheglin as an accompaniment for Italian food, enhancing and augmenting the tastes present in the meal. Mixtures of these spices may be more common than individual spice metheglins. The mead may be light to balance the honey and spice character, with the exception of garlic metheglins.
  • Flower Petal Metheglin - may be made from Rose Petals (Rhodomel), Dandelion Petals, Lavender Petals, Tea Blends (Earl Grey, Orange Pekoe, Bergamot, Chamomile, Jasmine, etc.), Heather Tips, Hop Cones (Miodomel), Honeysuckle Flowers, Elderberry Flowers or other flower petals. In most cases, these metheglins will be hydromels in order to showcase the fragile taste and aroma of the flower petals. Metheglins made with teas and hops will be the exception to this, and will be stronger in body. Honey character should be present, but will be light to balance the delicate flower character.
  • Peppery Metheglin - may contain White Pepper, Black Pepper, Mint, Spearmint, Peppermint, Lemon Grass, Curry Powder, Grains of Paradise, Juniper Berries, Spruce, Mustard Seed, Fennel, Turmeric, Fenugreek, Cumin or other peppery spices. These pungent spices provide a fitting counterpoint to the sweetness of the honey. Honey should be prominent but balanced with the spice character.
  • Chile Mead (Capsimel, named for the spicy chemical capsaicin and the genus of chile plants, capsicum) - may contain Jalapeno Peppers, New Mexico Green Chiles (Sandia, Espanola, Hatch, Numex Big Jim, Rio Grande), Red Chiles, Poblano Chiles, Mexican Pequin Pepper, Ancho Chiles, Chipotle Chiles, Tabasco Peppers, Cayenne Peppers, Anaheim Chiles, Serrano Peppers, Habanero Peppers, Cascabel Peppers, Thai Peppers or other chiles or peppers. The metheglin may vary widely in amount of heat. Always judge capsimels last in a flight. The taste of the chile should be evident as well as the heat. A strong sweetness and honey flavor will probably be necessary to balance the chile flavor. Chile character should also be present in the aroma.
  • Other - see general metheglin description.

M4
Braggot - A mead made with malted barley or wheat (also spelled Bracket or Bragget). The majority of the fermentable sugars should come from honey (otherwise it is really more of a honey ale). A braggot should have good malt character in the aroma and flavor. Hop bitterness, flavor and aroma may be present, but are not required. There should be a good balance between the beer aspect and the mead aspect of a braggot, especially with regard to maltiness and bitterness vs. honey character.

Brewer to specify sub-category :

  • Pale Braggot - has a color in the light straw to golden range. Malt taste will be light and honey character will be light to balance.
  • Amber Braggot - has a color in the golden to light brown range. The braggot will often contain crystal or caramel malt, which will have a residual sweetness that will blend with the honey aspects.
  • Dark Braggot - derives its color from darker malts, such as chocolate malt, black patent malt and roasted barley. The tastes of the darker malts (roasted character or chocolate malt smoothness) should be present.

M5
Mixed Category Mead - A mead that combines ingredients from two of the three previous categories. The mead should exhibit the character of all of the ingredients, and should show a good blending or balance between the various flavor elements.

Brewer to specify fruits, spices, malt type as appropriate :

  • Hippocras (Spiced Pyment) - a mead made with grapes and spices. Grassy white wine character or buttery chardonnay character is appropriate in hippocras (or pyment) only.
  • Apple Pie Mead (Cyser with Mulling Spices) - a mead made with apples and Allspice, Cinnamon, Cloves, Ginger, Nutmeg, Citrus Rind, Mace or other mulling spices.
  • Spiced Melomel or Fruited Metheglin - a mead made with fruit and spices.
  • Maltomel - a mead made with malt and fruit.
  • Malteglin - a mead made with malt and spices.
  • Other - see general mixed category description.


Aaron Birenboim
(505) 293-0110
aaron@swcp.com
http://www.swcp.com/~aaron/