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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * April 1, 2003 * Weldless spigot < Previous Next >

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Harwich Hall Of Fame (208.59.33.27)
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 03:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

anyone have any recommendations for a weldless spigot for my 15 gal aluminum brew stock pot? I know modifying aluminum is trick so advice would be great as well...thanks!!
 

David Gretzinger (163.206.45.223)
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I made one of these spigots for an aluminum pot and it works great.
http://home.swbell.net/bufkin/brew_kettle.htm
 

Harwich Hall Of Fame (208.59.33.27)
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2003 - 02:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

david, did you use stainless steel or brass? if brass, does it leave a taste?? thanks for the awsome link, just what i was looking for....
 

Bill Pierce (12.207.82.170)
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2003 - 02:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Brass does not contribute any flavor; it has been used in plumbing for about 200 years. Brass that comes in contact with wort or beer should have the small amount of surface lead removed (this is not a problem in water). Soak the brass fittings in a solution of two parts white vinegar to one part hydrogen peroxide until the brass turns a buttery color (usually less than 10 minutes). If the solution turns green you have soaked it for too long and must repeat the process with fresh solution.
 

Harwich Hall Of Fame (208.59.33.27)
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2003 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

bill, I wanted to add this to my brew kettle. Will there be any side effects in doing this, if the kettle and brass fittings will be heated to pretty high temps? thanks.
 

Bill Pierce (208.57.122.28)
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2003 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not sure I understand your question. Many homebrewers use brass fittings in vessels of all types without problem. If you treat the brass with a vinegar/hydrogen peroxide solution prior to first use there is no risk.
 

Harwich Hall Of Fame (208.59.33.27)
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2003 - 04:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ok, got it. thanks bill
 

Paul Edwards (199.46.200.232)
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2003 - 05:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

HHoF,

With dissimilar metals in contact with each other, there is the potential for galvanic corrosion.

John Palmer has a chart and a discussion of the phenomenom in the Appendix of "How to Brew".

Aluminum alloys are fairly high up the list of active metals. Brass is in about the middle of the list.

But based on John's discussion regarding contact surface area, I'd hazard a guess that brass and aluminum in contact with each other shouldn't pose a significant corrosion poblem. You'd eventually see some corrosion on the brass side.

If you've got o-rings or gaskets and SS washers between the brass and the aluminum, you'll have decreased the surface area even more. If the brass piece that goes thru the wall of the aluminum kettle is threaded and you've wrapped the threads in teflon tape, you'll have minimal contact, if any.
 

David Gretzinger (163.206.45.223)
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2003 - 05:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

HHoF, I used all brass parts and treated per Bill's method. Got the washers at NAPA but had to enlarge the ID using a conical grind stone. Had to file down some of the short nipple threads so the washers would slip over. The silicone came from ACE hdw and labelled as 100% Silicone and in the fine print it says "food grade" and good for 450 degrees (after curing).
 

Harwich Hall Of Fame (208.59.33.27)
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 01:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

so as much stainless as possible and food grade silcone, got it. Thanks Paul and David.

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