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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * February 11, 2004 * Black barley...I think I screwed up... < Previous Next >

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Jim O'Conner (64.70.24.110)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I brewed a foreign extra stout this last Sunday and used .63lb roasted barley, plus .25lb black barley. I was thinking black barley was interchangeable wih black patent malt since the package said, "smoother than black patent". But, I think I'm wrong. Will my brew be overly acrid now? Definitely roastey I'd assume!
 

Brandon Dachel (63.238.222.190)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 12:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> Will my brew be overly acrid now?

I'm confused. If black barley is less acrid than black patent and you used black barley instead of black patent why would the beer be overly acrid?
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 02:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Give the beer some time and see how you like it. You can always adjust the recipe next time you brew it. Roast black barley is not the same as black patent malt; it has a less acidic "bite." There is also carafa, or dehusked black malt, which is even a little more smooth.
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 04:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm also confused. What's the difference between "roasted barley" and "black barley"? Bill lumped them together as "roasted black barley"; are they one in the same? Meaning both refer to a dark but unmalted grain?

"Black malt" is not the same as "Black patent malt". "Black malt" can come dehusked as Bill mentions, or not. I am of the opinion that the European black malts are smoother than British or American black patent malts.
 

davidw (209.107.44.126)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Roasted barley is lighter in color than black barley. Black barley also gives a drier flavour contribution than roasted barley.

See Briess.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 04:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As I understand it, there is black malt and black patent malt, which are usually similar but have some differences depending on country of origin. There is also dehusked (debittered) black malt, which has a less sharp flavor. Additionally there is roasted unmalted black barley, which is used primarily in stouts, although other black malts may be used as well, depending on the recipe.
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 04:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, davidw. So black barley is a Briess product,and appears to be just a more highly kilned version of roast barley. I have never seen or heard of it until now. Are there any other maltsters other than Briess who make it?
 

Pat Whitbeck (198.183.184.8)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let me add a few thoughts to this.
If I am not mistaken, which is often the case, black patent is a kilned malted barley where roasted barley is roasted RAW barley. Big difference in flavors too. The roasted barley is much mellower than the BP and is used in all my stouts to keep the harshness BP gives out of the beer.
Many people have successfully mixed and matched all of the dark grains, chocolate included. As long as the % of the grist is where you want it, experiment for flavor.
Have fun.
 

Jim O'Conner (64.70.24.110)
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 08:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I first came across black barley in the Zymurgy issue with the Bell's ale clone recipes. It was recommended that black barley be substituted for the typical roasted barley in the stout recipes. And yes Chumley, black barley is simply a darker form of roasted barley.
 

Jim Layton (64.152.235.6)
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 03:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>So black barley is a Briess product,and appears to be just a more highly kilned version of roast barley.

My take on it is that Briess Roast Barley is rather light and that their Black Barley is comparable to most everyone else's roast barley.

Briess Roast Barley: 275-325L
Briess Black Barley: 500-550L
Crisp Roasted Barley: 690-700L
Pauls Roasted Barley: 600-680L
Thomas Fawcett Roasted Barley: 444-661L
Hugh Baird Roasted Barley: 500-600L
 

Brian Thatcher (63.191.209.70)
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 03:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My experience is the same as Jim's. Briess Roast Barley is a lighter product than what most people think of. I made this mistake in an Imperial Stout I brewed that turned out ok but wasn't quite the roast character I wanted. I had to look at the Briess website to realize this. What every other maltster refers to as Roast Barley Briess calls Black Barley.

Brian

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