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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * March 16, 2004 * Boddingtons clone < Previous Next >

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Captain Morgan (4.12.140.119)
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 09:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I want to do a Boddingtons clone and carb it with nitrogen. Anyone have a good recipe?
 

Belly Buster Bob (131.137.245.198)
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www.rorik.net/MyKnowledgeBase/MKBDisplay.aspx
Google does wonderful things
 

aquavitae (134.84.195.46)
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 09:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I made the following and thought it was pretty close, but better than the pub cans.

Real Ale Boddingtons (5 gallons)

6# Eng. Pale
5 oz. crystal (75)
3oz cane sugar

1 oz Goldings (4.75) (60 mins)
.25 Golding (20 min)
.25 Fuggles (3.5) (15 min)
.25 Goldings (5 min)

Irish moss

Wy. 1028, or WLP English

Simple infustion mash; primary @ 65f until clear; condition at 50f for one week; bottle/keg.

OG - 1.038
FG - 1.008
 

Sean Richens (142.161.27.252)
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2004 - 06:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rather than mess with nitrogen (more power to you if you can get it to work) you can reduce the carbonation to traditional British levels (13 psig at 60F works for me, or 1/3 cup dextrose to 6 US gallons). To cream up the head, do what Guiness did before they invented the widget.

Take a syringe, 5 or 10 mL will do. After pouring your beer, draw beer into your syringe until it's half-full. Then pull the plunger back to draw in an equal volume of air. Firmly squirt the beer/air mix back into your glass. It will do almost as good a job as a widget.

If you carbonate your beer to North American levels, DON'T do this. If you must try it to see what happens, do it in the sink!
 

Captain Morgan (4.12.140.119)
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2004 - 07:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The idea I had for a simple nitrogen injection was using one of the small CO2 injector. But get the nitrogen cartridges used in icing serving.
 

Belly Buster Bob (131.137.245.197)
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2004 - 08:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

correct me if I'm wrong but don't they use N2 just for dispensing? Isn't the actual carbonation C02? I thought they used N2 to hold head pressure so carb levels don't change and then strip some of the carbonation from the beer as it is poured. Will N2 even absorb into beer?
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2004 - 10:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Boddingtons in the can uses a widget very similar to what is used by Guinness to achieve the cascading head yet low carbonation. The beer itself is carbonated to about 1.2 volumes of CO2.

Personally I'm not fond of nitro ales other than dry stout, but this seems to be something of a trend these days. I prefer real ale served from the cask.
 

John Schmidt (65.238.10.108)
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 12:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Isn't the actual carbonation C02? I thought they used N2 to hold head pressure so carb levels don't change and then strip some of the carbonation from the beer as it is poured."

The carbonation (at equilibrium) is based on the partial pressure of CO2. If you don't have any CO2 in the headspace, CO2 will be released, and the total pressure will rise.
 

Sean Richens (142.161.105.180)
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 07:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Algas mixes are a complicated subject. They are used to maintain the desired CO2 pressure at the keg when a higher pressure is needed to reach a distant serving point from a central basement fridge. The nitrogen provides the push without messing up the carbonation level.

Can widgets use nitrogen to nucleate bubble formation. Guiness from the tap is a bit of both - allowing a decent serving time without the beer getting overcarbonated, and also putting that head on the glass.

Capt. Morgan, you aren't thinking of whipped cream dispensers, are you? I got a box of those by mistake once. They're nitrous oxide, and for lack of anything better to do tried one on a beer. The gas is actually sweet tasting, and gives you a very foamy sickly-sweet beer. Not what you want, I don't think.

And no, I didn't try them out as laughing gas. Without a proper anaesthesiologist metering in the right amount of oxygen, it's just a fancy version of sniffing glue.

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