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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * March 16, 2004 * Skotrats Traquair House Clone II < Previous Next >

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RJ Testerman (208.31.88.53)
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 09:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chumley recommended this to go on my Bill P St Chucks Porter yeast cake.

I just want verification that this is the same recipe after adjusting for 10 gal batch size particularly the ingredients and in the notes - to take 2 gal of the first runnings and boil down to 1 PINT? One other thing I have a tendency to ferment on the low end of the temperature recommendation or should I go on the higher side?


Skotrats Traquair House Clone II

A ProMash Recipe Report

Recipe Specifics

Batch Size (Gal): 10.00 Wort Size (Gal): 10.00
Total Grain (Lbs): 29.81
Anticipated OG: 1.073 Plato: 17.85
Anticipated SRM: 13.7
Anticipated IBU: 28.1
Brewhouse Efficiency: 65 %
Wort Boil Time: 150 Minutes

Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
99.0 29.52 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) England 1.038 3
1.0 0.29 lbs. Roasted Barley UK 1.029 575

Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.43 oz. Northern Brewer Whole 6.90 14.7 45 min.
1.43 oz. Northern Brewer Whole 6.90 13.3 35 min.

Mash Schedule
Mash Type: Single Step
Grain Lbs: 29.81
Water Qts: 38.75 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 9.69 - Before Additional Infusions

Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.3 - Before Additional Infusions

Saccharification Rest Temp : 154 Time: 90
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 10
Sparge Temp : 170 Time: 70

Notes
-----

Yeast: WYEAST Scottish Ale 1728 Scottish Ale Rich, smokey, peaty character ideally suited for scottish style ales, smoked beers and high gravity ales. Flocculation - high; apparent attenuation - 69-73%. (55-70°F)

Notes:
Remove two gallons of first runnings and boil down to about 1
pint and add back to boil. This will give the richer taste that you find
in this fine beer.

Collect 15 gallons of Run-off and boil down to your 10 1/2 gallon target (the other 1/2 gallon will come from the 1/2 gallon starter of yeast slurry that you have made in advance).

Add 2-3 teaspoons of Irish Moss into the boil just because.

Traquar is the finest of all Scottish Ales. Their recipe is pretty easy and straight forward. 99% Pale Ale Malt, 1% Roasted Barley and 35-37 IBU's.

I have found this to be the common thread for this brew after reviewing about 30-40 recipes from Homebrewers that have cloned this brew.

About 1/2 of the recipes claimed that Traquar uses East Kent Goldings as the hop and the Other claim that Northern Brewer is the Hop. I chose Northern Brewer because I am very fond of them as base hops.

I hope you like the recipe and if you brew it please let me know how it turned out and any changes that you have made.
 

Skotrat (24.61.120.214)
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 09:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Now,

Ferment Cool! You will love it and it will be a new way of life for you.

Boiling down until you get that pint of carmelized first runnings is the true path to the happy hunting grounds...

C'ya!

-Scott
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 09:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lemme just give Brother Scott a big AMEN on the boildown. I did one very simlar to his recipe last summer and pulled a pint of the 6 month old result yesterday...INCREDIBLE!
 

RJ Testerman (208.31.88.53)
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 09:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Scott

RJ
 

Skotrat (24.61.120.214)
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 09:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Even an OLD MEAN & FAT guy like myself gets lucky once in a while Denny
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 09:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think it's because we're BOTH old, mean and fat, Scott!
 

Jake Isaacs (160.129.126.219)
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 09:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm fairly young, rather pleasant, and perhaps carrying a few extra pounds, but I'd like to mention that the boildown method works very well in an oatmeal stout, as well. I'll probably also try it for a doppelbock as soon as my lagering fridge is back in action.
 

Tom Gardner (162.119.240.100)
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 11:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Definitely ferment cool. Skot's recipe is a keeper. Thanks Scott. Tom
 

Paul Hayslett (64.252.35.45)
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I made this same recipe in December. Not in bottles yet, but the samples so far taste excellent. (Thanks, Scott!)

The key to the boil-down is to have ABSOLUTELY NO DISTRACTIONS toward the end. Don't try to multitask on this one. When you get down to that last bit, you've got nothing but thick, syrupy froth that really, really wants to boil over or scorch. You've got to keep stirring. Stop to connect a chiller or something and you'll lose it.
 

ELK (24.10.168.30)
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 05:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I might have missed it but how long does that boil down take?
My LHBS hasn't got my Rye in yet so I'm thinking.
ELK
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Elk, it takes me about an hour or so, but time isn't as important as reducing the volume enough while making sure not to scorch it. You want to use a gentle boil on the reduction for as long as it takes.
 

ELK (24.10.168.30)
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 06:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Denny, I was just wondering how long so I could understand how it affects the brew schedule..I guess you just boil it down while the sparge is finishing which would require a 2nd brewer.
 

bilge rat (12.29.175.2)
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 08:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

boiling down the first runnings makes this beer incredible.

really.
 

ELK (24.10.168.30)
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 09:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How important is it to add water and hit that mashout temp? I guess I have to small of a MT for that much grain..I think 27# is my max in the 50qt cooler. Can I just start to sparge with 173 degree water and be ok?
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 09:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, I think so...mashout isn't a bad thing to shoot for, but it's generally the least of my worries. Sparge with hotter water. Use whatever it takes to get the grainbed to 170.
 

Paul Hayslett (64.252.35.45)
Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2004 - 12:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ELK,

For me, the boil-down took about 75min, which fit nicely in the 2.5hr main boil. I got the main wort to a steady state outside where I could keep an eye on it through the kitchen window. Then I did the boil-down on the kitchen stove. Worked like a charm. Key: I did all this after the kids were in bed, so there would be no distractions.

As for mashout, I didn't get one. I had stuffed 26.5lbs of grain in my 48qt cooler so that I could use the first runnings for the wee heavy and the second runnings for a pale ale (I steeped the roast barley separately). That left no room at all for mashout water. No problem. Like Denny said, I just used hotter sparge water.
 

Brewzz (65.88.98.1)
Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2004 - 12:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do you do the boildown without any hops?
Brewzz
 

ELK (24.10.168.30)
Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2004 - 12:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul, how much wort did you draw off for the wee heavy and how much did you get for the pale with that 26.5#'s? Why did you bother to steep the barley separately if is was only 1/4 lb? Room?
ELK
 

chumley (209.180.187.147)
Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2004 - 04:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>>Chumley recommended this...

The man is a fountain of brewing wisdom.

>>Do you do the boildown without any hops?

Yes.

>>Why did you bother to steep the barley separately if is was only 1/4 lb?

Smoother flavor. All the roasted barley is intended to do in a Scotch ale is to give that nice copper color, not any flavor. You don't want any hint of roastiness, just malt, Malt, MALT!!!
 

Paul Hayslett (64.252.35.45)
Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2004 - 05:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, what chumley said, on all counts.

I can't remember exactly how I split the worts between the two batches and it's not in my notes. I know I split it so that the total points came out right for the Scotch, which I then had to top up with water for the long boil. My efficiency stank so the pale came up short -- I threw in a pound of DME to compensate.

Another reason for steeping the roast barley separately was to avoid coloring the pale. And I steeped the crystal for the pale separately to keep it out of the Scotch.

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