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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * April 3, 2004 * Priming my Czech Pils < Previous Next >

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Richard Shaffer (64.35.155.194)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 06:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey now, I've had my Pils in my lagering freezer for 6 weeks and want to bottle it this weekend. Should I use an appropriate amount of corn sugar and just mix it in or should I use that with a bit of yeast. I used Wyeast Chech Pils and have been lagering at approx. 33 deg.
 

Doug Pescatore (141.232.1.10)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 06:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Richard,
I believe there will be enough yeast alive to carb up the beer. I will be bottling my first pils with this yeast this weekend. The early tastings have blown away saflager-23. I am going to throw my 3rd batch on the yeast cake this weekend and don't intend to stop until it become difficult to maintain lager fermentation temps in my chamber.

-Doug
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 06:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Richard, one thing to remember is that cold beer holds much more residual CO2 than warmer beer. Be sure to take that into account when figuring how much priming to use.
 

Doug Pescatore (141.232.1.10)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 06:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

DC, Don't we loose a portion of the CO2 when we warm it up for the diectly(sp?) rest?
 

fob (24.208.97.245)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 06:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny has a good point. My first lager a few years ago was a Dortmunder that turned out good, but was way over carbonated. Promash is good for figuring out the correct amount of primings.
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 06:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, you do Doug, but not all of it by any means. Then you cool it back down for lagering.
 

chumley (65.102.120.129)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Trial and error over the years has led me to believe that the amount of priming sugar to use for a 33°F lager is about halfway between the amount the Recipator tells me to use, and the 5 oz./5 gallon amount that I normally use.

So for Richard's case, picking the medium number of 2.4 volumes of CO2, the Recipator calculates that 5 gallons of Czech pils at 33°F requires 1.95 oz. of corn sugar. So, I would add 3.5 oz.

This works for me. YMMV.
 

fob (199.184.119.58)
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 07:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

3.5 oz. sounds about right. I use the temp of primary fermentation in the promash calc, not the lagering temperature. I figure there is not a lot of CO2 production during lagering, the residual CO2 was produced and dissolved during the active fermentation.
 

Richard Shaffer (64.35.155.194)
Posted on Saturday, March 20, 2004 - 03:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I kegged 5 gals. and have 7 gals. to bottle. My first glass of Czech pils from the keg is awesome. My family thinks I'm a little over the edge when I keep holding up my pilsner glass up to the light with a big grin on my face. Almost a religious experience. Richard.
 

Shane Mock (68.54.11.214)
Posted on Friday, March 26, 2004 - 03:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes it is! I have gotten very clear Czech pilsners by lagering in my smooth-sided 6 gallon carboy instead of my 5 gallon ribbed carboy, which I've noticed allows some yeast and stuff to hang in the ribs, only to be recirculated when racked. The smooth-sided 6 gallon carboy has eliminated this problem, and given me very clear beer!! There is something about that very dark gold color of a Czech pils, more so than other light-colored beers.

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