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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * March 30, 2004 * Kolsch Recipe < Previous Next >

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David Spaedt (208.217.9.214)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I apologize for this question but I can not figure out to search the forums.

Any tried and true Kolsch recipes. I prefer partial mash but can easily convert an all-grain.

Thank you in advance,

David
 

Vince Mash (209.204.73.230)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 04:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ask and you shall receive:

http://www.skotrat.com/skotrat/recipes/ale/kolsch/
 

Scott Peifer (152.163.252.67)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 08:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

David
Kolsch recipes are very simple. I have brewed this recipe 6 times. For ten gallons of Kolsch simply use enough Pilsner malt to get to about 1.045. App. 17 lbs in my system. Hallertau to about 20 IBU's. App. 1.5 oz. for 60 min. No specialty grains, just pilsner malt and hops.
Very tasty light beer for the summer.
 

Ray Mills (203.221.140.74)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 09:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

David

This is an easy beer to make but you need to use the right yeast or you will just end up with a Pale Ale, not that it would be a bad beer. The yeast is the secret. This recipe calls for a single decoction starting at 64 C mash. Good luck

Kates Birthday Kolsch

A ProMash Recipe Report

BJCP Style and Style Guidelines
-------------------------------

08-A Koelsch & Altbier, Koelsch-Style Ale

Min OG: 1.040 Max OG: 1.048
Min IBU: 16 Max IBU: 30
Min Clr: 4 Max Clr: 5 Color in SRM, Lovibond

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (L): 22.00 Wort Size (L): 22.00
Total Grain (kg): 4.92
Anticipated OG: 1.046 Plato: 11.51
Anticipated SRM: 5.6
Anticipated IBU: 32.0
Brewhouse Efficiency: 65 %
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
81.3 4.00 kg. Pilsner Malt (Hoepfner) Germany 1.038 2
16.7 0.82 kg. Wheat Malt Dark Hoepfner Germany 1.039 8
2.0 0.10 kg. Caramunich II Germany 1.036 46

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
18.00 g. Tettnanger Tettnang Pellet 4.70 10.7 First WH
15.00 g. Perle Pellet 9.40 19.1 70 min.
18.00 g. Tettnanger Tettnang Pellet 4.70 2.2 5 min.


Extras

Amount Name Type Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 Unit(s)Whirlflock Fining 15 Min.(boil)


Yeast
-----

White Labs WLP003 German Ale III
 

Hallertauer (192.85.16.1)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ray,

I don't know that the yeast is so important as the temp you ferment it at. Nottingham would be fine with the recipie you posted as long as you kept the temp down to 15°c.
 

Pacman (68.51.78.225)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let me start out by saying that I am completely biased in my opinion of this because Koelsch is one of my favorite styles and Nottingham is my least favorite yeast....

I am going to have to agree with Ray that yeast is very important in this style. You want some character from the yeast in the beer. What you don't want is a yeast that eats all the sugar and flavor out of the beer. You can make a good beer using other yeasts but it's not going to be a Koelsch unless you use a good German Ale yeast. The only ones i've used in a Koelsch so far are Wyeast 2565 and WL029 German Ale. I've not tried WL003 German Ale II or Wyeast 1007 yet but I am planning on a split batch sometime this summer with a couple of different yeasts along with the first two mentioned.
 

Hallertauer (192.85.16.1)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 03:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pacman,

Then what about safale 04? That would leave more sugars.

The thing I like most about Kölsch is that fresh delicate pilsner malt taste. I mean I think I'm after that more than some yeast taste.

A slight fruitiness would be ok so do you think S-04 may be a better choice?
 

Pacman (68.51.78.225)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hallertauer...

It's not necessarily the sugars (FG) that bothers me with nottingham it is it's ability to kill the flavor of the beer. If you have had good luck with nottingham then go ahead and use it.. IMO is just won't be a koelsch but what does it matter what I think anyway... Everytime i have used nottingham it has absolutely killed the beer no matter what type of mash schedule I use.

I too like the clean, crisp, pilsner like taste of the koelsch but I also like the slight fruitiness and sulfer that come from the yeast. As for using S-04 I don't know what to tell ya, i've not used that yeast.. From it's description it's basically an English ale yeast so who knows what you'll get with that. I tend to use liquid yeast for all my beers unless I want to do a quick batch and don't have anything but dry on hand... most times when I use dry yeast I am really disappointed... Most likely that is a lack of brewing skill on my part but then i am really happy with what I make with liquid yeast.

I beleive that if you are shooting for a specific style then you need to use a good yeast to hit that style and that for certain styles, including koelsch, you need to use a specific yeast. If you can't get the koelsch yeasts then go with something fairly neutral. Liquid try something along the lines of 1056... Dry leads you back to nottingham.... I may pull a couple of gallons off sometime and ferment it with nottingham just to see what it does to it for sure.
 

Beertracker (68.13.253.7)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 05:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've tried just about all of them (yeasties beasties) including SafAle K-97 & S-33 for a Koln-style beer. My favorite yeast is still Whitelabs #WLP029 with WYeast #1007 coming in a close second. Both yeast strains ferment well at cooler (56-62F) tempatures providing a crisp & dry backbone for a great Kolsch!

I'm like Pacman & enjoy brewing this style on a regular basis, especially for the Spring & Summer. AAMOF - I brewed a double-batch on Friday splitting the batches between the two yeast strains above. I'm going to brew another Kolsch after the #WLP029 & a Northern German Alt after the #1007.

IMO - You just cannot go wrong with Pacman's Black Widow Kolsch. It's an excellent award-winning recipe if you want to give it a try. I second or third the motion. PROST! Beertracker

Black Widow Kolsch
 

Pacman (68.51.78.225)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 05:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

heya beertracker

thanks!

WL0029 is my favorite yeast for the style too, Wyeast 2565 seems to be a competition favorite... How has the 1007 worked for you BT? I have thought about using this before but the low flocculation has me worried about it. Does it drop fairly clear with cold conditioning?
 

Beertracker (68.13.253.7)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 08:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pacman,
I use #1007 as basically my "house strain" with an average of 78.34%ADF! It definitely is slower to clear than #WLP029, but clarity always improves dramatically after 30+ days of cold-conditioning. The low flocc. has honestly never been a serious problem for me. However, it sometimes leaves behind a "dusty" sedimentation in the bottle which can lose you a point or two for clarity in a competition if the bottles aren't handled properly. CHEERS! Beertracker
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 08:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

1007 low flocculation? That certainly hasn't been my experience using it for alts.
 

fob (199.184.119.58)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 09:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny, Do you skim the top crop? Dave Miller talks about this yeast having flocculation problems if you allow the yeast top crop to collapse into the beer. I made a cream ale this winter that I skimmed the yeast off of and it cleared nicely.
 

Pacman (68.51.78.225)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 09:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

From the Wyeast site:

1007 German Ale Yeast.
Probable origin: Dusseldorf, Germany
Beer Style: Alt beer, American style wheat beers
Commercial examples may include: St. Stan Alt, Schlosser Alt, Frankenheim Alt, and Pinkus Alt
Unique properties - True top cropping yeast, low ester formation, broad temperature range affects styles. Will ferment cold; 55° F range, (13° C) producing lager characteristics including sulfur production. Style is noted for dry, crisp characteristics. Fermentation at higher temperatures (70-75° F, 21-24° C) may produce some mild fruitiness. Extremely poor flocculating yeast, generally remains significantly in suspension without treatment or filtration. Pad filtration is often difficult. Brewer's benefit from DE filtration or centrifuging. Maturation: Beers mature fairly rapid, even when cold fermentation is used. Low or no detectable diacetyl, alcohol tolerance approximately 11% ABV. Flocculation - low; apparent attenuation 73-77%. (55-68° F, 13-20° C)

As I said, I haven't used it but maybe once and that was a few years ago. A dusty sediment isn't a problem because i've found WL029 to be a bit dusty itself. My latest Koelsch I did a teriary step with it to drop more sediment because I was having some problem with "dust" in the bottle. The tertiary helped a lot. I will definitely have to give 1007 a try in my Koelsch.. Thanks Denny and BT for the info...

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