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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * March 30, 2004 * Splitting a batch for two BJCP beers. < Previous Next >

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Perry Mertz (66.228.225.9)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 05:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Other then
3B. American Wheat
and
17A. Bavarian Weizen

What other combinations can one use the same 10.5 to 11 gallon batch and split it with two different yeasts to produce two different BJCP beers?

I just tried an Oktoberfest recipe, with
Bavarian Lager (real Oktoberfest)
and a
Windsor Ale Yeast

Not sure what I will get with the Ale yeast will know soon though.

I am just wondering if others have a standard split batch beer recipes.

Cheers
 

chumley (65.102.120.129)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 06:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

CACA and CAP
kolsch and helles
steam and pale ale
 

Perry Mertz (66.228.225.9)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 07:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chumley:

Very good matches.
Especially like the idea of Koelsch and Helles.
BTW: What is a CACA?

Thanks.
Anybody else?
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Classic American Cream Ale...same recipe as CAP except you use an ale yeast.
 

Wykowski (209.222.26.27)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 07:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

how about spliting a batch bettween 1st & 2nd runnings like a Wee Heavy and a 70 Shilling
 

chumley (65.102.120.129)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 08:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Also, what to call a O'fest wort brewed with Windsor...how about American amber?
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 09:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's the closest thing I can come up with, chumley.
 

scott jackson (209.107.56.130)
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2004 - 11:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I split my Oktoberfest beer into two fermentors and pitched Oktoberfest yeast in one and Southern German Lager in the other. I entered the first as Oktoberfest and the second as Vienna Lager and won first and second in a Amber German Lager contest. I think the grain and hop bill might also fit for Steam beer, although the typical woodyness from Northern Brewer hops would not be there. Dry hopping with Northern Brewer might help.
 

Frank Marsh (69.177.22.186)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 02:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I know the first post mentions splitting a batch and fermenting with different yeast, but there are a few other tricks as well. The 2003 AHA Homebrewer of the Year won with Schwarzbier that was also his Dunkel, he steeped a pound of debittered carafa in half of his wort to make the schwartz.

I do this with my American Pale Ale, I steep chocolate malt in half of the hot wort and this becomes my American Brown Ale.
One brew session, two or more beers, you can't beat it!

Oh yeah, here's one Altbier/Oktoberfest you have to split the boil to accommodate the different hops schedules, but hey... one mash = two beers.
 

Paul Hayslett (64.252.33.10)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 02:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm planning:

hefe-weizen and raspberry wheat (fruit beer)
robust porter and robust porter w/Brett. (exper. and hist.)
 

Bob B (68.149.104.64)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 03:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I typically split my Brew House kits into two beers by steeping different grains for the water additions and along with different liquid yeasts. With the Cream Ale kit, got a very nice Scotch Ale (extra DME and peat smoked malt, Wyeast 1728) and an American Brown Ale (chocolate malt, hops, Wyeast 1056) out of the Cream Ale kit. Another hack job was a Porter (brown, amber, crystal, Wyeast 1098) and Belgian Pale Ale (Wyeast 1214) from the Pale Ale kit.

As the weather warms up and I go back outside to brew, I'm planning on splitting my all-grain brews also. Since I don't have room to store lots of beer, I would rather have 5 gallons of two or three styles than 5 gallons of one style.
 

Perry Mertz (66.228.225.9)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 04:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well moved my Oktober Ale into a secondary last night.

One thing I neglected to meantion was I had a little mess up with hops during the brew day. That is the reason I pitched a ale yeast too, as I realized I had over FWH the Oktoberfest and removed half of the floating hops before the boil started. I was completely unsure of what I would end up with.

The Ale is definately a very drinkable beer. Does not have much hop aroma, but nice hop bitterness and flavor. Malty aroma. Should have a very pretty color once it completely clears.

Given the English yeast, I'm sure it would pass as a Strong Bitter/EPA. I don't see why it would not work as an American Amber if I wanted to dry hop some Cascade into it.

You know it is kind of fun, having a little mess-up and producing "good beer" rather then trying to hit a "guideline" for a change.

My hoppy Oktoberfest will not be a true Oktoberfest (actually there is no place to put it, given the high hop flavor) but I'm sure it will not last long either, once it matures. Darn I have to actually drink a keg of beer vs saving it for contests. :)

Thanks everyone for some very good ideas on making two beers from a batch. I do have extra boiling kettles. I really should boil seperate more and just change the hop schedule.
 

chumley (216.161.219.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 04:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You're not the only one who likes to brew hoppy O'fests, Perry. The one I brewed last week had a OG of 1.068 and 52 IBUs. I mash hopped it with 2 oz of Sladek hops, FWH'ed with another 1.5 oz. of Mt. Hood, and used two bittering additions of Mittelfrueh.

That bitterness will smooth out considerably after 6 months of lagering (which is what I am planning to do).
 

Perry Mertz (66.228.225.9)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 04:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow that's hoppy for an O'fest. I still struggle with what is flavor and what is bitterness when it comes to hops in beer. I've never tried mash hopping. What % do you use for that calculation? I'm back up to 100% on my FWH, as my beers tended to be a little overhopped when I used -30% when I first started FWH.

I have no idea where my true IBU's ended up at.

Was asleep and didn't hit the OZ to LB button on my scale and put in .25 lbs vs 2.5 oz, not a huge difference but enough to make a different beer.

The lager is still bubblin' away. I am so low on beer after my winter (to cold to brew outside) months. I'm sure it would end up becoming perfect if I lagered it a long time, but my taps are empty so she will only get a couple months before it has to go to work. :) I call it taplagering...

I hit it real hard in both the early to late fall and then again early spring.
 

chumley (216.161.219.66)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I let the Strange Brew software calculate all my IBUs. It uses the Tinseth method. According to the software, 2 oz. of 4.9% AAU Sladek hop pellets in the mash contributes 2.7 IBUs. I think that underestimates it a bit. But, it calculates that 1.5 oz. of FWH Mt. Hood pellets (5% AAU) contributes 24 IBUs, which I think overestimates the bitterness (especially since I skim the hot break, which takes a lot of the pellet scum out the wort). So who really know? All I know is that a lot of those spicey noble hops in a decocted 1.068 lager brewed with 50% Munich malt kicks some serious butt. :)
 

Perry Mertz (66.228.225.9)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 06:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK, I'll bite...

Why do you skim the hot break off? Something new to me again.

Seems much of it ends up on the sides of the boil kettle anyways, I find myself trying to spoon it back into the wort.

Just wondering if I'm missing a jewel.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 - 06:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Perry, a few people believe that skimming the hot break results in clearer beer and less astringency. It's a minority opinion, however.
 

Marlon Lang (68.155.126.237)
Posted on Wednesday, March 24, 2004 - 12:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill,
Are you saying that chumley is a minority?

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