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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * April 18, 2004 * Why slowly drop temps after primary ferm. for a lager? < Previous Next >

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Matt Lucey (199.99.101.29)
Posted on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 04:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So I just finished the primary fermentation of my first lager, a CAP which went from 1.050 down to 1.010 in two weeks. I transferred it into a second corny last night and put it in the fridge and turned the temp down. Now, I was reading this morning that the temperature drop to lagering should be done gradually, what is the reasoning behind this? Just curious...

Oh and the CAP tasted GOOD, so I'm pretty excited for the final out come.
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 04:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The reasoning is that you want the yeast to stay active and dropping the temp too fast may shock the yeast and cause it to go dormant. That said, I almost never drop the temp slowly...
 

Rob Beck (65.66.149.200)
Posted on Saturday, April 10, 2004 - 03:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You will probably be OK. With the thermal mass of your fermentor, turning the ambient temp. down will not cause the internal temp. to drop that fast. The main reason not to drop the internal temp. too fast is not to shock the yeast. The gradual reduction of the internal temp. of the fermentor was buffered by the 5 gal. of 50 deg. beer in the fermentor.
Rob
Kansas City
 

Jared Cook (67.163.127.29)
Posted on Saturday, April 10, 2004 - 06:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you are kegging, screw the yeast, you don't need them anymore.
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 10:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jared, you want the yeast to keep working slowly during lagering to reduce unwanted "stuff". That's one possible explanation of Noonan's statement that beers lagers faster at 45F than 35F. After that's done, I agree with you.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 11:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All the evidence I have indicates that lager yeast goes dormant below 40 F. What occurs below that temperature is not really related to the yeast apart from the fact that some of it settles out of suspension, thus helping to clarify the beer.

Noonan has a lot of good information, but in his book he is a bit of a fuddy-duddy. I agree with Denny that once fermentation has completed crash cooling a lager has few if any adverse consequences. That said, when I can I drop the temperature about 5 degrees F per day. When I can't I RDWHAHB and I really don't notice any appreciable difference.
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 11:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Noonan has a lot of good information, but in his book he is a bit of a fuddy-duddy"..yeah, AT LEAST a fuddy-duddy! I find that much of what he says is interesting, but has little, if any, applicability in homebrewing.
 

Beerboy (81.134.87.11)
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 08:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Agreed, I got scared sh!tless about making lager after reading all he said about what could go wrong and the off tastes that could be produced if you didn't have the correct ph and temp etc. Until I made one and it turned out great and I took virtually no notice of his advice at all. Single mash infusion, batch sparge, crash cooled. Didn't check the ph or nuthin'. Made a great lager and will do the same again.

But I dis have control of temperature which has got to be the most important thing in making lager imo

There is something to be said for ignorance ;-)

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