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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through October 15, 2004 * It's Cold in the Shed < Previous Next >

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Magnus Graham
Member
Username: Cellarman

Post Number: 183
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 06:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Made a few brews in the past coupla years. All seem to trundle on at the end of fermentation leading to long clearing times and impatient thirst.
Problem is one of temp control. The shed seems to be 10-20C most of the year. My old cellar was similar. I do mainly ales or malty fruity brews as opposed to light crispy lagers.
Rather than building an incubator or juggling the different insulation needed throughout the year, is there a yeast that enjoys the 15C target temp.
I've just checked the Wyeast site and Lagers ~5-13C, ales ~15-23C. I want smack in the middle. Tempted to use lager yeast at higher temp rather than ale at lower. Would ales go to sleep at 15C?

I've not really played with yeast yet. Safale 04 is what the shop sells, that's what I try to use.

Orrabest
Mag
 

Nick Shore
Junior Member
Username: Nshore

Post Number: 43
Registered: 09-2003
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 10:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

WY3538 Leuvan Pale Ale is 15.5C-23C
WY2565 Kolsch is 13C-17C
WY1007 German Ale is 13C-19C
WY2112/WLP810 San Francisco is 14C-18C
You might try any of these with success. The main thing would be to keep the fermentation temperature stable.
 

Magnus Graham
Member
Username: Cellarman

Post Number: 184
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 11:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Looked at Kolsch and German Ale. Poor flocculators. May try them. May also try my native - Scottish Ale yeast.
I would probably be safer with lager yeast too warm than an ale yeast too cold.
Any thoughts on lager yeasts fermented too warm?

Mag
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 775
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 11:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All of the yeasts mentioned would work. I especially recommend the San Francisco lager strain, a Scottish ale strain, or Wyeast 1007. These are excellent fermenters at 15 C (59 F).
 

Jeffery Swearengin
Intermediate Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 479
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 12:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Why not spend the effort & time to retrofit your shed for better temperature control?
CHEERS! Beertracker

"From man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world." ~ Saint Arnold of Metz (580-640) - Patron Saint of Brewers

 

J. Steinhauer
Member
Username: Jstein6870

Post Number: 237
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 01:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've used WY1728 (Scottish) in as low as 10C with no trouble. I left it in primary for 6 weeks with frequent rousing, however (in a Wee Heavy strength ale). 1007 was done in two weeks at 10C for a normal gravity brew.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2344
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would stay away from lager yeasts too warm. I brewed a pils last year with the WLP bock yeast at 16C and it came out way too fruity.

The Saflager yeast seems to be opposite, fruity when fermented cold, clean when around 14C or higher.

Besides those already mentioned, I have had success with Nottingham at 15F, and WY1338 European ale yeast. The WY1338 takes a long time, though. Nottingham is the quickest of any yeast (liquid or dry) at these temps.

I brewed a cream ale this Tuesday, pitched it on a yeast cake of WLP029 German/Kolsch, fermented it in my basement at 16C, and three days later it is clear and nearly done. But that was from using a fresh yeast cake.
 

PalerThanAle
Senior Member
Username: Palerthanale

Post Number: 1174
Registered: 04-2002
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 04:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> I have had success with Nottingham at 15F

With what? Yeastcicles?

PTA
You don't stop laughing because you grow old, you grow old because you stop laughing.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2346
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 04:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oops. Damn those Europeans and their funny units! :-)
 

Mark Zgarrick
Junior Member
Username: Maz

Post Number: 92
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 06:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Magnus, I wouldn't worry about 1007 being a poor flocculator. My alt is crystal clear - not hazy at all.
 

Geoff Buschur
Member
Username: Avmech

Post Number: 187
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 07:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't have the patience to convert things from your 100 degree scale to our 212 degree scale, but if you are trying to figure out how to keep your beer warm enough for ales I have a very cheap and easy fix. Go to your local pet store and buy a cheap (~$10 US) submersible 25W heater for an aquarium. The low end should be able to be set as low as 18.3 degree C and stay within .2 degree C. Dip that puppy in sanitizer and drop it in your fermenter. If you think 25W won't be enough then get a 50W, or wrap a blanket around your brew.

When you are done fermenting pull the heater out and let the temp drop and watch your brew clear up.