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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through October 28, 2004 * Intriguing population variation? < Previous Next >

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Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 1681
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, October 24, 2004 - 08:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am still checking my fridge slurry for viability, and today after day 68 I checked my reference sample, which I took I think at day7, and put into a smaller tube, with some 5-10% headspace, and since then this tube has not been opened, in fact it has not even been touched, or shaken. It has also been in the fridge.

Contrary to that I have guessed this had the same low viability as the main slurry, now around 20%. The general glycogen level was also about as low as the main slurry, except possibly a little higher estimating from staining only.

Howeve I noticed that some individuals (a few % of the population) seem to have incredibly high glycogen levels still. As per the relative staining they would be rated as high.



This is intriguing :-) The question is now how the heck these cells have kept so high glycogen levels? I have two theories, maybe that they had very high sterols levels to start with, and thus didn't metabolise the glycogen on O2 access, or maybe the cell happened to die early, while the glycogen levels was still high. Unfortunately I can't stain the *same cells* with both iodine and methylene blue to see if that cell is dead or alive.

Any ideas?

/Fredrik
 

Mark Tigges
Member
Username: Mtigges

Post Number: 186
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, October 24, 2004 - 09:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So don't. Just take two equal samples stain one with meth blue and one with iodine. If its death, it will be apparent from correlation. Personally, I almost guarantee its death.
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 1683
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, October 24, 2004 - 09:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

About 80% of the cells are dead, and thus would stain from methylene blue. While only a few % of the cells appear to have incredibly high glycogen level and give intense staining from iodine. So there is no obvious correlation. No question most of the dead cells have low glycogen levels.

Either a small fraction of the viable ones, have made it through the 68 days without seemingly depleting any of it's energy reserves, which seems like a bit of a mystery (unless it's dead of course). Or it's the fraction of the dead cells who died "prematurely" for some reason while their glycogen levels was high. By assumption dead cells doesn't deplete any glycogen.

I think the last explanation is more likely too(ie it's dead) but I am not sure enough.

/Fredrik
 

Patrick C.
Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 196
Registered: 01-2001
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 03:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

These cells are survivalists. They are hoarding glycogen and weapons, and building a shelter in your fridge.
 

PalerThanAle
Senior Member
Username: Palerthanale

Post Number: 1193
Registered: 04-2002
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 03:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Weapons of Mash Destruction?

PTA
You don't stop laughing because you grow old, you grow old because you stop laughing.
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 1687
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 04:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Patric, do you have any further idea why some (a few %) individuals would be super cells? Not that it doesn't make sense from an evolutionary point of view but I wonder how some cells have made it without depleting seemingly much energy during something that is hardly optimal conditions? It would be impressive indeed. Did that cells just happened to be ultimately healthy initially (which might be as there is always variation within the population), or are does some cells simply have a different (more clever?) survival strategy than the others? That would be quite interesting if a single strain splits into different survival strategies upon starvation. It would make sense from an evolutionary point of view but it seems like a pretty complex behaviour, which again would be amazing. Can someone confirm this?

/Fredrik
 

PalerThanAle
Senior Member
Username: Palerthanale

Post Number: 1194
Registered: 04-2002
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 04:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I can neither confirm nor deny this.

PTA
You don't stop laughing because you grow old, you grow old because you stop laughing.
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 1688
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 05:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I take that as a confession PTA. Do you wish to deny your confirmation? or shall we proceed with the evidence we have.

/Fredrik