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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through February 06, 2005 * Hops and Malted barley BBQ rub? < Previous Next >

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Kevin Davis
Member
Username: Ktdavis98

Post Number: 189
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 05:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A guy on the food channel (on BBQ with Bobby Flay) made a BBQ sauce and dry rub using hops and malted barley. They said he is a home brewer, and does BBQ for the rodeo somewhere. He would make the dry rub with unnamed spices, some malted barley, and cascade hops (both ground in a food processer), then add a beer to some of it for the sauce he mopped on later. Anyone else tried this? Care to share a recipe? It sounds good to me, I am going to give it a try.
Kevin
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 4147
Registered: 01-2001
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 07:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There's a fish and chips place here in town that buys barley and hops from my LHBS to make wort to use for battering the fish. They also use a little ground barley in the batter.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Richard Nye
Advanced Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 546
Registered: 01-2004
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 08:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Seems like you could make a good sauce from a high gravity DME wort.
 

Kevin Davis
Member
Username: Ktdavis98

Post Number: 190
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 09:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yea Richard, I don't see why not at least for the wet part of the BBQ. Everyone that was eating these ribs seemed to really like them. But like you said, a HG wort would be sweet as any honey BBQ. This guy was putting a lot of hops in the dry rub also. At least it looked like a lot for the amount of rub he was making. Like I said, it sounds good to me.
Kevin
 

Why1504
Member
Username: Why1504

Post Number: 144
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 09:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have had mixed results with Food Channel recipes. When making a BBQ rub it requires a hot sweet balance. Dark sugar and red pepper. Hops, Amarillo and maybe Cascade I would think would provide quite an interesting kick on the hot side. as to the Malted Barley, This I am less sure of. To me, uncooked barley has a bit of a tannin taste which I don't particularly care for. That is not to say it would not be good, particularly if you used a beer or wort based sauce/mop in conjunction with the rub. Personally, I always use beer, wine, or hard liquor as a steam agent when I smoke meat, it has a great tenderizing effect.

Want a suggestion for a mop or sauce?
 

Kevin Davis
Member
Username: Ktdavis98

Post Number: 192
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 30, 2005 - 02:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sure "Why1504" throw one out! I agree with the necessary balance between hot and sweet, then I lean just a little to the hot side, followed by a cold brew. This guy was saying the barley added a sweetness, and slightly nutty taste. If I am using a crystal malt in a brew I usually end up popping a little in my mouth, and crunching on it a few minutes, I like the flavor, pale malt on the other hand is a little more bitter.
Kevin
 

Why1504
Member
Username: Why1504

Post Number: 146
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Sunday, January 30, 2005 - 06:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kevin, I agree and like the idea of the crystal so here you go:

I am going to wing this so by all means adjust to taste, this is how a chef will develop a recipe.

Take a 4 quart sauce pan

2-3 TBPS light Olive Oil (NOT EVOO)
3 cloves garlic smashed and chopped fine
1 cup chopped onion ( cut it in 3/8" or smaller pieces)

Place oil in pan heat to med
cook onion until slightly brown
throw in garlic for 30 sec and remove from heat (DO NOT Burn, if it burns start over)

OK lets throw in 4 cups of wort say 1.050 OG and bring to a boil cut back to a simmer and cook this down for say 15 minutes



Now we can dump in the rest:

1 can of plain tomato paste say 16 oz
2 TBPS yellow mustard
1 TBPS kosher salt
1/4 tsp white pepper
1 tsp black pepper
1 tsp cummin
3 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes (like you get at the pizza place)
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 TBPS Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 cup white vinegar
cayenne pepper to taste
1.5 TBPS Amarillo (maybe mix in some Cascade)whole hops minced very fine (go with a fruity variety)

Mix all this up and taste.

Now I expect this is going to be real watery at first.
If the wort taste is overpowering add 4 parts tomato sauce 1 part vinegar and red pepper flakes. (start w/ no more than 4oz tomato 1 oz vinegar). Retaste.

Stir often, add water if the taste is balanced but it gets too thick or begins to burn.

Cook it down at low heat for say 30 to 45 min and taste. This is where I would add more wort or hops. I want the hops and malt flavor to be in the background. I do not want them to overpower the other flavors. But if you can't taste add more, slowly, stir in and reetaste. If the wort/hops are overpowering, add some catsup and more brown sugar. I also expect the sauce is low on salt and black pepper so adjust accordingly. You will want to cook this down til it is good and thick maybe another hour.
Most importantly, remember you can't take anything out so add slowly and retaste often. One other note if the salt taste is overpowering at first it will dissipate (I will be shocked if this happens).

You have 4 taste to balance here sweetness - wort brown sugar mix and spice hops to pepper mix so as you build up try to keep this in mind. Notice I did not suggest adding more brown sugar, this can be effectively done at any time but if the sauce is not sweet enough but the wort flavor is too prevalent add more sugar.

Sorry I can't refine and cook this prior to posting this for you, but my only fermenter is full of BVIP and I can't make any more beer til I empty it.

I almost forgot, write everything down if you want to replicate, when I do stuff like this I don't. In fact I don't even use measuring cups and spoons I just eyeball and build it up by taste, more creative that way.

And, if you want to richen the flavor at the end, throw in 1/2 a stick of butter.

Good Luck future chefs!!

Hank
 

Geoff Buschur
Advanced Member
Username: Avmech

Post Number: 522
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Sunday, January 30, 2005 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds like Malta Goya is a good candidate for this recipe.
 

Why1504
Member
Username: Why1504

Post Number: 147
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Sunday, January 30, 2005 - 07:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Go for it. Good thing about Malta Goya is you could start with 1 small bottle (8 oz I think) and add bottles as you went, give you an easier way to adjust.

(Message edited by why1504 on January 30, 2005)
 

Kevin Davis
Member
Username: Ktdavis98

Post Number: 196
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 30, 2005 - 11:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Hank,
Although I have never cooked professionally, I enjoy cooking, and I do get a lot of praise for some of my various cookout, and dinner recipes.

I hope no one is offended by this food topic, I just thought it was interesting, and really sounded good to me, and this guy is a homebrewer, so I thought it was not impossible he may visit here from time to time.

This guy based his recipe on the dry rub, then only added a beer, and maybe some tomato sauce, or paste to the rub to make the mop sauce he used while grilling. So I may just start with the dry ingredients, and work from there, then add the wet stuff when I am happy with the dry.
Kevin
 

Why1504
Member
Username: Why1504

Post Number: 148
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, January 31, 2005 - 02:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That will work, main thing, taste as you go, if you use the hops or crystal in the dry form chop them up real fine. When I make a dry rub I start with paprika and a mix of brown sugar, white sugar and sometimes splenda if I want to cut the carbs. Just kick up the flavor from there. I never mesure when making a dry rub just taste and add til I got it right. If I end up with extra put it in a jar, in the dark. It will last for 3 months. One more secret (assume you will use pork) wash the meat, dry the meat with paper towels,if ribs peal the membrane off the underside, rub the meat with a light coating of yellow mustard, just make the meat wet. Sprinkle the rub all over the meat til you can't see the mustard and wrap the meat in saran wrap. Refrigerate for 24 hours prior to cooking. For pork low (225) and slow smoked with hickory or pecan. Ribs I cook @ 275 - 300 I cook pork til it is 185 degrees inside wrap the meat in foil amd place in a per warmed cooler for a couple of hours. Ribs are cooked till I can pull off a rib but the meat stays on the bone. If you want a mop, taks some rub, homebrew, vinegar, and applejuice and put in a spray bottle, Hit the meat one an hour. If you have a grill that holds moisture like a Big Green Egg skip the mop.

(Message edited by why1504 on January 31, 2005)