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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through August 27, 2005 * Bottling Question. Bigger Bottles Take Longer To Carbonate Than Smaller Bottles? < Previous Next >

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Shamus Mcoi
New Member
Username: Shamus

Post Number: 17
Registered: 08-2005
Posted From: 216.106.88.64
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 01:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, after being worried about getting the primer sugar mixed good enough when I bottled, I took the advice here, and opened a few bottles early. I opened two twelve ounce bottles (those bottled towards the bottom of the wort), and they were carbonated great. In fact, the beer is also delicious.

Well, went to open one of the 22 ounce bottles tonight, and was dissapointed. Almost no carbonation. Some bubbles, but only that. No rich frothy head.

So I have three questions.

First, do bigger bottles of beer take longer to carbonate.

If not, is it possible that some of the others will still be carnonated, but for some reason not this one?

Lastly, any reason not to drink the rest anyway? I mean, it does taste good, and while not carbonated, there were just a few bubbles. :D
 

Wayne Faris
Member
Username: Bugeaterbrewing

Post Number: 234
Registered: 12-2004
Posted From: 68.112.33.88
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 01:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think you answered your own question. You stated that the properly carbonated bottles were from the bottom of the bottling bucket. If your priming sugar was not properly mixed, that is where the majority of the sugar would be, hence the difference in carbonation.

On the other hand, maybe you are right about bigger bottles taking longer to carbonate. In that case, your priming sugar may have been properly mixed after all. The only way to find out for sure is to let the big bottles sit another week or two and see what happens. Anyway, if it tastes good as is, you are in good shape as there is no easy way to fix it without risking screwing it all up. Just mix better next time.

Wayne
Nebraska Brews Since 2002
 

Shamus Mcoi
New Member
Username: Shamus

Post Number: 18
Registered: 08-2005
Posted From: 216.106.26.196
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 01:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ya, that's definetely the plan with the next brew. Will mix it better for sure.

Just noticed something else on the 22 ounce bottle.

The beer in the 12 ounce bottles wasn't "clear" either.

When I opened the 22 OZ bottles, I poured about half into a glass, and it was clear. When i poured the rest in, it wasn't. Like it had settled in the bottom of the bottle.

And strangely enough, it seemed more carbonated.

Is that even possible? LOL.
 

Tim Wi
Member
Username: Riverkeeper

Post Number: 199
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 65.7.92.144
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 01:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Shamus,

A good seal is something to think about.

I no longer boil my bottle caps because I found that the ones I didn't use immediately would not hold a seal.

I found that out with a batch in which 1/2 were flat. The exact number that I had saved of botlle caps that had been boiled for a previous batch then not used.

Whenever I do bottle, I put the sugar solution into the bottling bucket as I am syphoning beer into it. I wait until I have a quart or two of beer in there, than pour it in. I always get even mixing that way.
 

Michael
Advanced Member
Username: Hoppop

Post Number: 707
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 69.132.121.114
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 02:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Shamus, fwiw, make sure you add the priming sugar into the bottling bucket and "then" rack the beer....never had a problem with inconsistent carbonation doing this. I also stash the bottles away for a couple of weeks at room temp (low-70's)...used to use a mix of Rogue bomber, and 12 ouncers when bottling a batch....always got that nice 'pffffffft.

(Disclaimer - I currently use 5 gallon "bottles")

Good luck.
 

Catt22
Member
Username: Catt22

Post Number: 130
Registered: 12-2000
Posted From: 66.117.215.71
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 02:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Shamus,

Patience is likely all that you require. When bottling, keep the bottles at room temperature for a minimum of two weeks. If the carbonation is weak, give them another week or more. Chill them in the fridge for at least a few days before you try one. Give them a little more time and a little more cold.
 

Yam
Junior Member
Username: Yam

Post Number: 43
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 63.164.247.234
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 01:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Shamus,

I have also switched over to 5 gal bottles. However, my experence with bottling was that the pints always carbed quicker than the 12 oz bottles and usually maintained a slightly higher level of carbination than the 12 oz. I always figured this was due to the fact that larger containers require less priming sugar. Otherwise as others have stated... time.
 

The Gimp
Junior Member
Username: Gimp

Post Number: 45
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.5.44.21
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 03:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I bottle from corny kegs. Boil sugar in water, pour it in. Add some yeast if the beer is over 2 onths old. Put lid in place, pressurize to 15psi to seal. SHake the hell out of it to insure everything is mixed well. Use 3psi to deliver beer to bottles.

I see no differnce in the carbonation time or level of bottles with this method.

It does not matter if they are nibs, bombers or 12 oz. They all seem to take the same amount of time and end up with the same amount of carbonation.