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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through November 16, 2005 * Pitching Temps. < Previous Next >

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Randy McCord
Intermediate Member
Username: Mccord

Post Number: 500
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.174.177.171
Posted on Sunday, November 13, 2005 - 02:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just wondering how many of you all actually follow Wyeast's advice and pitch at 70 deg. and wait for fermentation to start before lowering the temp. of your liking.

I normally just pitch at the temp I'm fermenting at. Does it really make a difference? I've got my starter of 2112 going and I guess I never read the back of the pack instructions before. I plan on pitching at about 60 deg. because that is the temp. my brew comes out of the chiller this time of year.
 

Astro
Member
Username: Astro

Post Number: 124
Registered: 07-2004
Posted From: 24.252.211.159
Posted on Sunday, November 13, 2005 - 03:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've tried it both ways, and have decided that cooling the wort to fermentation temps before pitching works best for me. Somewhat difficult for lagers in the summer, since my CFC only drops it to about 70deg or so. I just put the carboys in my fermentation freezer for however long it takes (usually no more than 10 hours or so) and then pitch.
 

Wayne Faris
New Member
Username: Wayne

Post Number: 3
Registered: 11-2005
Posted From: 68.189.233.69
Posted on Sunday, November 13, 2005 - 03:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I generally pitch at 70 and then put the carboy in the fermentation fridge. I don't have enough room above the carboy to pour in the yeast (in a starter of course) while in the fridge and I am just too paranoid about moving a full carboy more often than absolutely necessary.

Wayne
Bugeater Brewing Company
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 3891
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Sunday, November 13, 2005 - 04:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My typical procedure for lagers is similar to Wayne's other than the fact that I usually chill the wort to 60-65 F if the tap water temperature allows it. By the time there is active fermentation (8-12 hours for lagers) the fermenter has cooled sufficiently.
 

Dave Witt
Advanced Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 820
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 205.188.116.68
Posted on Sunday, November 13, 2005 - 05:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think for ales, at least, you should pitch at 70 only if you're not using a starter. If you have plenty of yeast, there's no reason not to chill to fermentation temp, whether its lager or ale, assuming you have the chilling capability.
 

Tony Legge
Junior Member
Username: Boo_boo

Post Number: 99
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 142.162.32.73
Posted on Sunday, November 13, 2005 - 06:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do what Wayne does also.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 1971
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.220.144
Posted on Sunday, November 13, 2005 - 10:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I used to pitch lagers warm and cool when fermentation started but I noticed that I was getting a lot of estery brews. Pitching at cold temperatures took a long time to start cranking. I have found that what seems to work best for me is to cool to the mid 50s, remove to a room temperature environment and recool when signs of fermentation are observed. This way I avoid the temperatures that esters form at during the lag phase but still get things going in a reasonable amount of time. OTOH What do I know anyway?

Dan

--This space is again being left intentionally blank.-


 

Steven Edward Haun
Member
Username: Stevehaun

Post Number: 189
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 4.159.98.183
Posted on Sunday, November 13, 2005 - 11:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I take the Wayne's world approach as well. I can easily cool to 65F (WI well water) and then I throw them into my fermentation freezer. Yesterday I pitched yeast at 3 PM and was cooled to 50F by bedtime.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 5224
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Tuesday, November 15, 2005 - 08:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like to cool both ales and lager to a few degrees below the temp I'm going to ferment at to allow for the thermal effects of fermentation.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Jim Keaveney
Advanced Member
Username: Jimkeaveney

Post Number: 788
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 64.12.116.14
Posted on Tuesday, November 15, 2005 - 08:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do like Wayne does. If you are expecting an especially short lag time it would be safer to cool first as Denny says.

I believe the reason WY suggests that method is to assist in kick-starting fermentation but I have to admit I probably do it that way because it is convenient and I have never had a problem.