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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through December 10, 2005 * Nitrogen/CO2 Mixer < Previous Next >

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Greg Nolan
Member
Username: Greg

Post Number: 115
Registered: 06-2001
Posted From: 207.69.139.134
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 01:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have searched the archives and can't seem to find an answer to my question. I have a nitrogen tank that I use to push wine and a co2 tank for beer. Can i use some type of mixer to get a nitrogen/co2 mix for stouts without a tank dedicated for no/Co2? I was thinking I could put a regulator on a hose from the nitrogen and a regulator on a hose from the cow and use the two regulators to mix the gas as both hoses are combined into one hose to the stout keg. I hate to buy another tank dedicated to just nitrogen/co2.
 

Paul Edwards
Advanced Member
Username: Pedwards

Post Number: 826
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.236.26.26
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't think that just hooking the hoses from two regulators together will work.

There's a rather expensive mixer used for that sort of thing.

here's one:

http://ceisites.com/blenders.html

I googled "nitrogen AND CO2 AND mixing" to find it.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 4005
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 02:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gas blenders are nifty, to be sure, but way overpriced for a homebrewer's budget unless you could get one at a huge savings such as from a defunct brewpub or beer bar. You'd have a much better chance of finding a nitro regulator on eBay.

Otherwise Paul is absolutely on the mark.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2085
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 02:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Greg, what is wrong with just using N2 to push your beer? CO2 is not really required so long as the beer is fully carbonated. I don't see N2 damaging your beer at all.

Dan

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1546
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 02:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

CO2 is not really required so long as the beer is fully carbonated.

The logic behind having a mixture of Co2 and Nitrogen is to make sure that the Co2 levels in the beer stay somewhat consistent.

This is why you see 70/30 or 75/25 mixtures.

It is important to have that slight percentage of Co2 there so that your beers do not go flat over time.

This is why the mixture is needed for beer.

Since wine is not carbonated just nitrogen is used and no mixed gas is needed.

With the exception of GUINNESS (Murphys Caffreys etc.) which use Nitrogen at a much higher pressure to saturate the beer mostly to produce the classic creamy head, other beers/bars etc. merely use the mixed gas to be able to push the beer long distances from the walkins to the serving towers without getting beer that ends up being more and more carbonated via the sole use of Co2.

Since nitrogen does not increase the carb levels over time like Co2 does mixed gas has become a common practice in most establishments that are sering draught beer.

-Scott



(Message edited by skotrat on November 28, 2005)
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1547
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 03:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Now,

Here is a good explanation of why Mixed Gas or Beverage Gas is a good path over time and serving.

The McDantim School of Gas Blending: Beer Gas 10

-Scott
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2088
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I hadn't considered the possibility the beer degassing into the increasing space above the beer. I doubt that the beer would go flat, but its carbonation level would go down and adding CO2 would help hold this possibility at bay.

Dan

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1549
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 03:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"I doubt that the beer would go flat, but its carbonation level would go down and adding CO2 would help hold this possibility at bay. "

hmmm, if a beer is made to be served a 2.5 volumes of Co2 and over time drops to 1.5 or for that matter anywhere below the 2.5 that it is made to be served at is is defintely going flat over time.

No ifs ands or buts about it.

This is why the major breweries have traveling Quality Control tasters visiting establishments that sell their beers on draught.

Guinness for example has a well known reputation of pulling their beers from establishments that do not live up to their serving QA rules/regs.

-Scott
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2089
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 03:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If it would drop that low, that is definitly a problem, but I am doubting that it would go that low. I could be all wrong in any case.

Dan

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Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 4008
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Serving a beer entirely on nitrogen would result in a loss of carbonation over time. It would be less of a problem for short-term dispensing.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2090
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 04:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

True enough, Bill.

Dan

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1551
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 04:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Definitely Bill...

If you are a commercial establishment or a homebrewer that is turning over a 1/2 bbl in a few hours time it will be no biggie but if you have kegs that empty over days or weeks you do not want a decrease or excess in Co2 volumes.

It is important to keep that strong and steady.

If you are a pub owner and you are watching the bartender pour out the first pour constantly because of higher carb levels then you are watching your incomes diminish and your bottom line get bigger.

Ultimately you want a pour that will produce a good looking head and evenly carbed beer everytime.

Controlling your Co2 levels via pushing with mixed gas will give you that perfect pour everytime.

Presentation in a commercial draught environment is EVERYTHING.

-Scott
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 4011
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Agreed, Scott. The only reason I would see for a homebrewer to use pure N2 is if he/she had an N2 regulator but lacked a source for mixed gas.

In a commercial environment, consistency of presentation is very important. I can think of some bars where poor dispensing procedures greatly diminish the quality and value of beer on tap. Guinness deserves some credit for carefully supervising and instructing its draught accounts in the proper way to serve their beer.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1554
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2005 - 04:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

About 8-9 years ago I had lots of overcarbed beers on tap...

Drove me nuts and wasted a lot of beer too.

I as a homebrewer switched over to serving all my beers with Beverage Mixed Gas (usually the 75/25 mix) and I have never looked back.

It has made a huge difference on the quality of the pour in my house.

I have a wide variety of styles that I like to brew and I have found that I can do the Carb calculations for the Co2 and get the volumes that need in the keg to start with and then serve with mixed gas. I have not been unhappy with the results at all.

I definitely think that mixed gas is the way to go when it comes to serving my homebrew.

-Scott
 

Bob Girolamo
Junior Member
Username: Brewerbob

Post Number: 75
Registered: 06-2002
Posted From: 192.91.172.42
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 02:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Scott, Iv'e done the same when I have run out of C02 on a Saturday and with company coming over for the Saturday night bar scene, I hooked up my beer gas(70/30) and everything poured fine. I left that tank on for a few weeks and noticed that most of my beers still poured fine but, I was starting to get disappointed with my Hefeweizen pouring no appreciable head. So I think there may be some exceptions to the rule. I think it was asking too much to keep 3 atmospheres of C02 in the Hefe. On the other hand, allot of my bar crowd seemed to drink more as the pours were "creamier" and drank easier than with the standard C02 setup. I believe with commercial bars whether they have long draws or direct draws they benefit from this on the monetary side.
Just my .02 cents
Ask not what your country can brew for you but, what you can brew for your country!

http://www.geocities.com/bob_girolamo
 

Greg Nolan
Member
Username: Greg

Post Number: 118
Registered: 06-2001
Posted From: 207.69.138.137
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 03:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks so much for the input of one and all. I like the idea of just serving all the beers with a mix like Scott. Last week I went into Bristol Brewing in Colorado Springs and was very impressed with their Nitro, a Nitrogen/Co2 IPA; one beer and I am off on a mission. I think I will look into just having my CO2 tank filled with a mix next go around. From what I can gather, my CO2 regulator and normal faucets will work; perhaps not ideal but they should get me headed in the right direction. Is this correct?
 

Joe Rovito
Member
Username: Joez8

Post Number: 175
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 68.84.35.203
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 03:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So is the beer gas used to push beer the same mix as the gas used to dispense Guinness ? Or is the Guinness generally 5 or 10 pts higher on the N2 ?
For a datapoint, I just paid $56 for a "20 lb" tank of mixed gas. This is a lot more $$$ than CO2, and because it is GAS and not liquid, I assume there is a lot less useable volume inside.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2096
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.220.144
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 03:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Greg, N2 is at far higher pressures than CO2 and needs a different regulator. I also believe that the tank's valve is different. It is the nitro faucet that does the nitro thing, not the nitro per se.

Joe, "beer gas" will not last nearly as long as CO2.

My local gas passer builds a perferated dip tube into their beer gass tanks to make a better mix as it is used.

dan

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1556
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"It is the nitro faucet that does the nitro thing, not the nitro per se."

No... not really... The restrict/sparkler plate in the faucet does place a large part in the pour but carbonation volumes and nitrogen/mixed gas serving pressure play a bigger role.

Almost all (Guinness, Caffreys and the like) beers that are served through a "stout faucet" are carbonated with a very little volume of Co2... Like for example 1.0-1.2 volumes of Co2.

They are then served at a temp of 38-42f with a mixed gas or nitrogen based push of 30-40 psi.

The goal is to saturate the beer with nitrogen as it is going through the restriction plate so that you get that great creamy head and cascading pour.

You can even get a pretty good cascade with a regular faucet.

"N2 is at far higher pressures than CO2 and needs a different regulator. I also believe that the tank's valve is different."

You will need a high pressure regulator that you can pick up at any carbonics or rest. supply place (Banner Beverage, Foxx or Superior Products).

If you are in the Chicagoland area then all the tanks (Co2 or Mixed) are the same tanks and all you need is a female threaded high pressure regulator and you are good to go. Most everywhere else in the US uses a Female threaded regulator for Co2 and a Male threaded regulator for mixed gas and/or Nitrogen tanks.

Not sure why Chicagoland is different on this...


"Joe, "beer gas" will not last nearly as long as CO2."

This totally depends on what you are serving. If you are serving beers that you are looking for that cascading nitro pour then you will go through your mixed gas faster.

If you are pouring just standard faucet pours then it will last just as long as Co2 tank of the same size.

"For a datapoint, I just paid $56 for a "20 lb" tank of mixed gas."

This is way way high. I would suggest maybe shopping around for a better price as it really appears to about $30 higher than what you should be paying for mixed gas.

-Scott

edited to fix some typos


(Message edited by skotrat on November 29, 2005)
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2098
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 01:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have produced the cascading head with just CO2 and a normal beer faucet - not very dependably but it can be done.

Scott, I do hope that you are not giving the impression that a significant amount of the gas in the Guinness bubbles is N2. N2 is only 1/80 as soluble in water as CO2. Very little N2 makes it through the faucet. I find it hard to believe, considering I have seen it done without N2, that the N2 is causing the cascading beyond simply producing the push power.

Please feel free to correct me if I am misguided.

Dan

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1557
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 02:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Please feel free to correct me if I am misguided. "

We are not talking about the Nitrogen as a soluble Dan...

We are talking about the Nitrogen saturating the beer...

There is a large difference...

-Scott
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 4020
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 02:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Because the nitrogen is so little soluble in the beer, when the beer and gas are passed through the restrictor plate in the faucet almost all of the gas exists in the form of tiny bubbles that create the distinctive cascading head.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2100
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 02:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK Scott, how much of the gas content of the bubbles is N2?

Dan

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Thomas Eibner
New Member
Username: Thomas

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 167.206.189.3
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 03:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Scott,

What you are saying makes no sense at all. With nitrogen being so much less soluble the likelyhood of the carbonation in the beer going down over time is very low. Especially if there is 30 psi of nitrogen pressure on it. Why would the co2 go out of solution when the surrounding pressure is higher than the co2 would need for it to go out of solution.
For nitrogen to saturate the beer, it would have to be disolved in the beer, which Dan pointed out isn't going to happen because of the solubility of Nitrogen. You're using nitrogen to keep the carbonation level to just the right setting to make sure you don't overcarb the beer. But with a 75/25 mix of gas the beer will overcarbonate over time IMO (and in my experience too) and be very foamy coming out of the tap. Example:

Your beer is carbed at 10 psi at the temperature you keep it at. You put the nitro/co2 mix on at 30 psi. So part of the air in the headspace is co2 and the pressure is higher than what is in solution in the beer. Ergo the co2 will dissolve in the beer. That lets more nitro/co2 mix into the keg and it will continue until a certain equbrilium (sp?) is reached. If that isn't going to overcarb it, I don't know what is.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1558
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think that you possibly do not understand the definitions of the words... They are two very different things...

sat·u·rate Audio pronunciation of "saturate" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (sch-rt)
tr.v. sat·u·rat·ed, sat·u·rat·ing, sat·u·rates

1. To imbue or impregnate thoroughly: “The recollection was saturated with sunshine” (Vladimir Nabokov). See Synonyms at charge.
2. To soak, fill, or load to capacity.
3. Chemistry. To cause (a substance) to unite with the greatest possible amount of another substance.


adj. (-rt)

Saturated.



*******************************************************

sol·u·ble (sly-bl)
adj.

Capable of being dissolved, especially easily dissolved.


Source: The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Main Entry: sol·u·ble
Pronunciation: 'säl-y&-b&l
Function: adjective
1 : susceptible of being dissolved in or as if in a fluid
2 : capable of being emulsified

-Scott
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2109
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 04:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK, what is the saturation point, in volumes, of N2 in water at, say, 35 psi?

Dan

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Bob BB (BAB's)
Junior Member
Username: B_a_brewer_2

Post Number: 59
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 24.129.203.183
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 04:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan, I have reached my saturation point with your troll nonsense and stupidity. Do you need to know what volume that is? STOP THE BUS!
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1559
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 04:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here Dan,

You can do it yourself...

http://www.mcdantim.com/beergas.htm

follow the links...

Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures

"If that isn't going to overcarb it, I don't know what is."

25% (the Co2) of the 30-40 psi is enough to keep the Co2 constant not to overcarb the volume amount.

(Message edited by skotrat on November 29, 2005)
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2112
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 04:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting link, Scott. I did not see any N2 molecules drawn in the liquid portion. Maybe I missed something.

Bob, don't let me hold you back!

Dan

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1560
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 04:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Maybe I missed something."

Indeed
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2113
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 04:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fine Scott, tell us what I missed - please.

Dan

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Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 1855
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 167.4.1.38
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would agree that the N2/CO2 mixed gas does not contain as much gas as a straight CO2 tank of the same size. The N2/CO2 is a higher pressure (2000-2500psi) but it straight gas, whereas the CO2 is at 800psi, but maintains that for a long time as the liquid turns to gas when dispensed. So if one opened both tanks at the same setting and let them purge, I would 'guess' the N2/CO2 would empty quicker. I have not tested this theory but have experienced this over years of carbing/pouring/etc...

I pay ~$20 for CO2 and ~$28 for N2/CO2 (20#). $56 is robbery...

I like the effect of pushing with the N2/CO2, as it creates a different mouthfeel and appearance than straight CO2. Some N2 IS absorbed/dissolved, and the bubbles are definitely smaller, and it is noticeable (w/o restricter plate).

No interest in solubility/saturation rigamarole...

rig·ma·role :

1. Confused, rambling, or incoherent discourse; nonsense.
2. A complicated, petty set of procedures.
 

Patrick C.
Intermediate Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 466
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 12.169.58.91
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 06:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If anyone cares, CO2 will go in and out of solution regardless of what the N2 pressure is. The partial pressure of CO2 is what determines how much dissolves in the liquid. If you have 30, 100, or 1000 psi of Nitrogen and zero CO2, the CO2 will come out of solution until it reaches equilibrium. It may take a while, but it will happen. CO2 molecules are constantly entering and leaving the liquid, but if it's in equilibrium it happens at the same rate and we can't tell the difference.

doh! missed the partial pressure links above...

(Message edited by Patrickc on November 29, 2005)
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1563
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 07:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Patrick,

Thanks for also trying to make sense...

-Scott
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2116
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.37
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 07:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

True enough Patrick, but nobody is debating CO2 that I can tell. It is the N2 that we are interested in. I want to know how many volumes of N2 go into come out of the beer. I haven't seen anything regarding that yet.

Dan

(Message edited by listermann on November 29, 2005)

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Patrick C.
Intermediate Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 467
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 71.56.78.223
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 11:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Around 0.043 volumes, or thereabouts if Henry's Law applies to beer. Doesn't sound like much, but I'm guessing most of it comes out at once.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2129
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.220.144
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 - 11:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

.043 is not far off the 1/80th CO2 or .031 gives at 2.5 volumes. The question is, does this make a siginificant difference? I don't know.

It is my impression that the whole nitro thing was Guinness' attempt to mimic the head produced from a beer engine's sparkler using gas pressure to pump the beer instead of an engine.

Dan

(Message edited by listermann on November 30, 2005)

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Bob Girolamo
Junior Member
Username: Brewerbob

Post Number: 76
Registered: 06-2002
Posted From: 192.91.171.36
Posted on Wednesday, November 30, 2005 - 04:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Maybe we can get hold of a draft techie at Guiness for this one?
Hey, what about the Wizard from BYO?
Chris C can you relay this thread to him?
Ask not what your country can brew for you but, what you can brew for your country!

http://www.geocities.com/bob_girolamo
 

Greg Nolan
Member
Username: Greg

Post Number: 128
Registered: 06-2001
Posted From: 4.228.204.121
Posted on Monday, December 05, 2005 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good news. I called my local gas supplier and gave him a description of my CO2 regulator and he said it should work fine for the Notrogen/Co2 mix. It has a 1700psi inlet pressure. So, $90 for the bottle, $10 for an adapter and I am off and running. $19 dollar refills. Really for about $80 dollars for equipment plus $20 for gas and I will be into Nitrogen. Guess I have to drink lots-o-beer to deplete my current C02 bottle.
 

Greg Nolan
Member
Username: Greg

Post Number: 129
Registered: 06-2001
Posted From: 4.228.204.121
Posted on Monday, December 05, 2005 - 09:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You know right after my last post it dawned on me. Since I already have the Nitrogen for my wine, I could just carbonate the beer with C02 and push it with pure nitrogen. If the beer starts going flat I could give it a shot of CO2.