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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through February 27, 2006 * Procedure for bottling lagers? < Previous Next >

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Bill Ballinger
New Member
Username: Willy_bill

Post Number: 11
Registered: 01-2006
Posted From: 40.0.40.10
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 05:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When it is time to bottle a lager, what is the procedure? I know there is debate about adding more yeast depending on lagering time, however the temperature and duration once bottled isn't as clear to me.

Do I store the bottles at 68-70 degrees for several weeks before putting them back in the fridge? What temperature in the fridge? How long before they are ready? Do I not store them at 68-70 degrees ever?

Just Confused????
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1808
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 05:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill,
I store my bottles at room temperature until my "test" PET bottle is fully carbed, then they go back in teh fridge.

-Doug
 

David Lewinnek
Member
Username: Davelew

Post Number: 225
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 198.51.251.199
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like to let the secondary fermenter warm up a bit before bottling. That helps avoid foaming when the cold beer hits the warm bottle (this only happenned to me once, but it was really annoying to stare at two cases of half full bottles and wait until the foam subsided enough that I could fill them the rest of the way).

I don't add yeast, and I let the bottles carb at lager fermentation temperatures, usually in the 50s.
 

Derric
New Member
Username: Derric

Post Number: 2
Registered: 08-2005
Posted From: 217.172.187.46
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have good results bottling cold (lagering temp at about 32F), then letting them sit at basement temp for a couple weeks as usual. Refrigeration after that is optional, I've done it or not, depending upon room in the fridge.

I've had beers that lagered at 32F for 3 months that carbonated fine without additional yeast.

Note, I did have one event where my priming sugar syrup didn't mix evenly. I chalked that up to the extreme temp differences - near boiling syrup, freezing beer. Therefore, with lagers, I am sure to stir the priming sugar in well. (I never had an issue with room-temp ales).
 

Rob Farrell
Intermediate Member
Username: Robf

Post Number: 302
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 69.138.242.154
Posted on Friday, February 17, 2006 - 02:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have to let the secondary warm up to be able to siphon into the bottling bucket. Trying to siphon cold beer always fails as the beer warms up and CO2 comes out of solution, breaking the siphon. Is there a better way?
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1811
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Friday, February 17, 2006 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since I do a solid D-rest at 65F my lagers tend not to have very much CO2 left in them after the secondary because most of it came out of solution when I raised the temp to 65F. I just go straight from the fridge to the bottlig bucket.

-Doug
 

Sean Richens
Intermediate Member
Username: Sean

Post Number: 287
Registered: 04-2001
Posted From: 204.112.128.150
Posted on Saturday, February 18, 2006 - 03:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wouldn't warm the beer up before bottling, the CO2 stays supersaturated for a while at least. Better to drop the temperature at the end so that you're below saturation. The bottle shouldn't be warm enough to provoke serious gassing. I give it quite a vigorous stirring in the bottling bucket to break out excess gas as well as mix in the priming sugar.

I give lagers two weeks at 65F to start priming up before sending them back to 50F for conditioning. They still need another two to four weeks before they're fully conditioned.