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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through March 24, 2006 * Honey Explosion < Previous Next >

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Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1843
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Wednesday, March 08, 2006 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just racked a honey wheat from the primary to the secondary last night and got a nice sample for tasting. This batch is basically the same recipe as another well know honey wheat with the exception of using 2-row and the final ounce of hops was cascade. The other very big difference is that I carmelized 1 pound of the two pounds of honey in the way that Chumley described.

My first taste was an all out honey explosion. It was right up front there like I have never had before in any beer I have made. It wasn't overly sweet, but just has that honey taste. The taste faded as I continued to drink (not sure if my taste buds just got used to it), what was left was a very nice honey wheat that was perfectly balanced between bitterness and sweetness with enough hop flavor to mix in well with the malt and honey.

-Doug
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4006
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Wednesday, March 08, 2006 - 05:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No need to thank me, this is what I do. :-)
 

Craig Henry
Intermediate Member
Username: Sail

Post Number: 327
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 136.181.195.8
Posted on Thursday, March 09, 2006 - 03:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug,

Can you post more about your recipe and the carmelization process? I have plans for a Honey Wheat in the near future. I tried doing a search for this but couldn't find anything.

Thanks!
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1845
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Friday, March 10, 2006 - 06:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here ya go:

Grain Bill:

5 pounds of 2 Row Pale Malt
4 pounds of Wheat Malt
1/2 pound of Crystal 77L
1/2 pound of Dextrin Malt
4 oz. flaked barely
2 pounds of Orange blossom honey (1 pound carmelized) All honey added at the end of the boil.

Hop Bill:

1 ounce of US Hallertau (4.7%) for 40 minutes
1 ounce of US Tettnanger (3.8%) for 20 minutes
1 ounce of US Cascade (4.7%) for 10 minutes (only thing I had)

Yeast Safale S-33 (edme)

During the boil I poured about half the honey into a small pot and added 1 teaspoon of Yeast Energizer. Then stirred until it began boiling. After boiling for a little while it would start to foam/boil over. As sson as that statered I removed from the heat and kept stirring. When it went back down I put it back on the heat until it acted up again and removed again. I did this many times until the honey was a dark almost rust color.

So far it tastes great. I will likely do this one again.

-Doug
 

Craig Henry
Intermediate Member
Username: Sail

Post Number: 328
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 136.181.195.8
Posted on Friday, March 10, 2006 - 08:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Excellent! Thanks Doug
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4018
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Friday, March 10, 2006 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug's honey wheat recipe bears a striking resemblence to...oh, nevermind.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1846
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Friday, March 10, 2006 - 09:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes it does, but notice that I no longer give that recipe any credit because it has become just plain wrong to do so without following the recipe exactly as it was written.

I call my recipe Honey Wheat. So please do not call your beer Honey Wheat unless you follow this recipe to the T.

-Doug
 

Paul Hayslett
Advanced Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 995
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 67.163.171.138
Posted on Friday, March 10, 2006 - 09:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug,

It's about time for my yearly batch of honey wheat and I think I may try yours this time. But you don't specify your mash schedule. Did you use the same schedule as the recipe-which-will-not-be-named? (I did that once. Made for a loooong brew day. I doubt I'll do it again.)

Thanks.
"Vime's approach to paperwork was not to touch it until someone was shouting, and then at least there would be someone to help him sort through the stacks." -- Terry Pratchett
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1847
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Friday, March 10, 2006 - 09:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul,
I did a single infusion at 149F. This is a couple of degrees below my usual 152 to 155, but I wanted to get a highly fermentable wort becuase S-33 tends to finish up a bit shy of other dry yeasts. My OG was a bit higher than expected at 1.074 and my final was about what was expected at 1.010.

-Doug
 

Paul Hayslett
Advanced Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 996
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 67.163.171.138
Posted on Saturday, March 11, 2006 - 12:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Doug!
"Vime's approach to paperwork was not to touch it until someone was shouting, and then at least there would be someone to help him sort through the stacks." -- Terry Pratchett
 

Craig Henry
Intermediate Member
Username: Sail

Post Number: 329
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 136.181.195.8
Posted on Monday, March 13, 2006 - 06:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, I noticed the resemblance to 'you know what.' I don't dare mention the name of 'you know what' due to the fact that people are convinced that brewing 'you know what' makes you somewhat of a sloppy heathen.

I guess I am just a closet 'You know what' brewer. I will probably even mess with Doug’s recipe and still call it 'you know what.' Sorry Doug - but thanks for the carmelization tip!
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1849
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 68.64.185.27
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 05:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Craig, That beer we dare not mention is a great starting point. No matter what I have done to tweak it I am always happy with the result. I think the 40 minute bittering addition gives it a very smooth bittterness that is perfectly balanced.

I have done that beer not to be mentioned recipe to the T once. It didn't take that much more time but I am sure I looked funny standing over my cooler pouring and stirring like a mad man all the while cursing at the top of my lungs when I would over shoot the temp. It takes a person with better planning skills to make the multi step look smooth.

-Doug
 

Paul Hayslett
Advanced Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 998
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 67.163.171.138
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 02:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug,

I also followed that other recipe to a T once, but I used a direct-fired tun (my brew kettle, actually) to make the steps. I'm sure I cursed just as much and just as loudly. After a while, my wife poked her head out the door and said, "Aren't hobbies supposed to be FUN? Why do you do this if it stresses you out so much?"

In my case it also took much longer than my usual 60min mash. Or maybe it just seemed that way. I decided that step-mashing is one of those things you have to practice to get good at and I just don't want to put in that much effort.

The one thing the step mash seemed to do for me was make the beer clearer. I've never had such a clear wheat beer. All my other procedures are far too inconsistent to allow drawing conclusions about its effects.
"Vime's approach to paperwork was not to touch it until someone was shouting, and then at least there would be someone to help him sort through the stacks." -- Terry Pratchett
 

John Ferens
Junior Member
Username: John_ferens

Post Number: 80
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 192.104.24.222
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 03:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug and/or Chumley,

During the honey caramelization, what is the yeast energizer for?

John.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1850
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 05:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is the stuff I used.
Yeast Energizer: A blend of diammonium phosphate, magnesium sulfate, yeast hulls and vitamin B complex. Use ½ teaspoon per gallon in wine to stimulate fermentation. Use ¼ teaspoon per gallon in beer to revive a slow or stuck fermentation. Especially useful in meads and honey brews.

-Doug
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4025
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 06:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

John, read this:

http://hbd.org/hbd/archive/4800.html#4800-3

The yeast energizerr is used as a nitrogen source required in the caramelization process.
 

John Ferens
Junior Member
Username: John_ferens

Post Number: 81
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 192.104.24.222
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 08:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Chumley and Doug, now it makes sense. I've been researching tweaks to my annual version of the "brew that shall not be named," and this looks to be an interesting twist. I'm also thinking of using WLP023 Burton yeast and doing my first decoction from the protein rest up to wherever it goes and supplement by infusion to get to 150. This will be a brew for consumption in July. Any thoughts as to using this yeast with this brew?

Cheers!
John.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1851
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 08:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have never used that yeast. But the recipe that shall not be named has been done with many different yeasts and from what I understand it turns out good.
I have used the following on mutations of the recipe that shall not be named:

1056
Safale -04
Saflager -23
Safbrew -33 (edme)
WY whitbread

-Doug
 

John Ferens
Junior Member
Username: John_ferens

Post Number: 83
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 68.234.152.92
Posted on Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 01:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've used Nottingham and S-04. While others have liked what I brewed with S-04, it wasn't my cup of tea, er, brew (I've done a stout and the honey wheat). WLP001/WY1056/US56 (I've only used the US56) seems to taste dryer than Nottingham, but I like it for the most part, though I wanted to try something different here. Nottingham seems to me to have become much more tart over the last 4 years - either that or I'm just treating it too well by pitching two packs, generously aerating, and fermenting in the low 60s. I'm not a big fan of the tartness, but I like dry with complexity and it seems as though the Burton yeast might fill the bill.

Anyone else have comments on WLP023 for a Honey Wheat?

Thanks,
John.