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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through May 05, 2006 * Hefe-weisen < Previous Next >

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Ric Heinz
Intermediate Member
Username: Rheinz

Post Number: 362
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 64.154.26.251
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just got back from the Northern Black Hills area. I sucked down quite a few pints of Widmer Hefe-Weisen while there this week.

Anyone have a good recipe for this that they would like to share?
Ric
Flatfender Brewing, NW Houston
 

Mike Mayer
Advanced Member
Username: Mmayer

Post Number: 665
Registered: 12-2002
Posted From: 66.94.94.249
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 07:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just sent a recipie to you that I brew every summer.
 

Paul Erbe
Advanced Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 546
Registered: 05-2001
Posted From: 12.27.22.67
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 07:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Share with the class please.
 

PaulK
Intermediate Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 359
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.84.198.40
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 08:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Want a real hefeweizen recipe?
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1908
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 08:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Now,

Brew this!

 
East Kingston HefeWeiss

A ProMash Recipe Report

BJCP Style and Style Guidelines
-------------------------------

15-A German Wheat and Rye Beer, Weizen/Weissbier

Min OG: 1.044 Max OG: 1.052
Min IBU: 8 Max IBU: 15
Min Clr: 2 Max Clr: 8 Color in SRM, Lovibond

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 16.00 Wort Size (Gal): 16.00
Total Grain (Lbs): 28.83
Anticipated OG: 1.052 Plato: 12.8
Anticipated SRM: 3.9
Anticipated IBU: 14.2
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75 %
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Pre-Boil Amounts
----------------

Evaporation Rate: 15.00 Percent Per Hour
Pre-Boil Wort Size: 20.65 Gal
Pre-Boil Gravity: 1.040 SG 10.02 Plato

Formulas Used
-------------

Brewhouse Efficiency and Predicted Gravity based on Method #1, Potential Used.
Final Gravity Calculation Based on Points.
Hard Value of Sucrose applied. Value for recipe: 46.2100 ppppg
% Yield Type used in Gravity Prediction: Fine Grind Dry Basis.

Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Rager


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
64.2 18.50 lbs. Wheat Malt Germany 1.039 2
31.2 9.00 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) Belgium 1.037 3
4.6 1.33 lbs. Vienna Malt Germany 1.037 3

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.00 oz. Hallertauer Mittelfruh Whole 4.50 11.7 50 min.
1.50 oz. Hallertauer Mittelfruh Whole 4.50 2.5 15 min.


Yeast
-----

WYeast 3333 German Wheat

Mash Schedule
-------------

Mash Type: Multi Step

Grain Lbs: 28.83
Water Qts: 34.60 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 8.65 - Before Additional Infusions

Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.20 - Before Additional Infusions

Acid Rest Temp : 0 Time: 0
Protein Rest Temp : 122 Time: 20
Intermediate Rest Temp : 144 Time: 10
Saccharification Rest Temp : 155 Time: 90
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 10
Sparge Temp : 170 Time: 70


Total Mash Volume Gal: 11.05 - Dough-In Infusion Only

All temperature measurements are degrees Fahrenheit.


C'ya!

-Scott

(Message edited by skotrat on April 28, 2006)
 

PaulK
Intermediate Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 361
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.84.198.40
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 09:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's far too authentic Scott. I think he'll be sadly disappointed if he wants something like that Widmer American Wheat....err hefeweizen.
 

Mike Mayer
Advanced Member
Username: Mmayer

Post Number: 666
Registered: 12-2002
Posted From: 68.76.85.146
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 10:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, Here ya go:


A ProMash Recipe Report

BJCP Style and Style Guidelines
-------------------------------

17-B Wheat Beer, Bavarian Dunkelweizen

Min OG: 1.040 Max OG: 1.056
Min IBU: 10 Max IBU: 20
Min Clr: 10 Max Clr: 23 Color in SRM, Lovibond

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 10.50 Wort Size (Gal): 10.50
Total Grain (Lbs): 22.00
Anticipated OG: 1.057 Plato: 14.11
Anticipated SRM: 4.5
Anticipated IBU: 12.7
Brewhouse Efficiency: 72 %
Wort Boil Time: 75 Minutes

Pre-Boil Amounts
----------------

Evaporation Rate: 2.00 Gallons Per Hour
Pre-Boil Wort Size: 13.00 Gal
Pre-Boil Gravity: 1.046 SG 11.51 Plato

Formulas Used
-------------

Brewhouse Efficiency and Predicted Gravity based on Method #1, Potential Used.
Final Gravity Calculation Based on Points.
Hard Value of Sucrose applied. Value for recipe: 46.2100 ppppg
Yield Type used in Gravity Prediction: Fine Grind Dry Basis.

Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Rager


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
50.0 11.00 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) Belgium 1.037 3
50.0 11.00 lbs. Wheat Malt Germany 1.039 2

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.00 oz. Hallertau Hersbrucker Whole 2.90 12.7 75 min.


Yeast
-----

White Labs WLP380 Hefeweizen IV Ale


Mash Schedule
-------------

Mash Type: Multi Step

Grain Lbs: 22.00
Water Qts: 30.00 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 7.50 - Before Additional Infusions

Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.36 - Before Additional Infusions

Acid Rest Temp : 112 Time: 15
Protein Rest Temp : 0 Time: 0
Intermediate Rest Temp : 0 Time: 0
Saccharification Rest Temp : 151 Time: 75
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 10
Sparge Temp : 168 Time: 45


Total Mash Volume Gal: 9.26 - Dough-In Infusion Only
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1909
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 10:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Widmer that is brewed in Portsmouth by Redhook uses Canadian 2 Row, Munich and American Malted Wheat. I believe that there is also a small amount of crystal malt (40L) in there also...

(Message edited by skotrat on April 28, 2006)
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1910
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 10:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ahhhh

From their website:

Stats beer
 

PaulK
Intermediate Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 362
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.84.198.40
Posted on Friday, April 28, 2006 - 11:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Don't forget the Alt yeast on that "hefeweizen".
 

Bob Crane
New Member
Username: Limbo696

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 67.166.97.228
Posted on Saturday, April 29, 2006 - 12:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Don't forget the Wyeast 1010. This ** IS ** the same yeast the Widmer uses and a personal yeast favorite of mine. It's a GREAT substitute for California style ale yeast and also good for making Alts and Kolschs.

This was the first microbeer I ever tried and a personal favorite. I think it basically defined the American wheat beer style.

In addition to the hops shown above, I'd reccomend the following grain bill:

50% two row
40% wheat malt (white or red)
10% vienna or munich malt
 

PaulK
Intermediate Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 364
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.84.198.40
Posted on Saturday, April 29, 2006 - 01:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow, Bob Crane?!?! I thought you were dead. Any future episodes of Hogan's Heroes in the works?
 

Bob Crane
New Member
Username: Limbo696

Post Number: 3
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 67.166.97.228
Posted on Saturday, April 29, 2006 - 01:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No, I'm the other Bob Crane but when my wife and I watched "Autofocus" the story of the other Bob Crane, she was sick due to all the sexual debauchery in the movie. Her comment was: "This movie reminds me too much of you!" and I was never able to watch the whole movie. ;(
 

Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 1393
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 68.4.202.69
Posted on Saturday, April 29, 2006 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I personally like a little more "hefe" in my "weizen". IMHO, you can beat 3068 yeast for a hefeweizen, fermented at 67F.
 

Tim Polster
Member
Username: Bassman

Post Number: 201
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.95.250.97
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 03:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does the Widmer Wheat really have 32 IBU?

That seems rather bitter for a wheat.

I have had that beer and I don't remember that much bitterness.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1914
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 03:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim,

if the 32 IBUs is made up of flavor and aroma hops then it quite possibly may have 32 IBUs

Maybe they are just not pushing the big 60 minute bittering hop path in the beer.

It is also an American Wheat Beer so you can push the hop envelope a little more

-Scott
 

Bob Crane
New Member
Username: Limbo696

Post Number: 5
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 67.166.97.228
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 04:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

From my memory, I'd say ~20-23 IBUS seems more right. It's hard to argue with the numbers from the official site though! I'll have to taste one as soon as I can. ;) I know my wife can drink this beer however and she normally cannot drink a beer with 32 IBUs of bitterness.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2766
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 12:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"if the 32 IBUs is made up of flavor and aroma hops then it quite possibly may have 32 IBUs

Maybe they are just not pushing the big 60 minute bittering hop path in the beer. "

Scott, are you saying that they put 32 IBUs worth of hops in the wort but, with timing, only use a fraction of the IBUs, but they then publish the bittering level as 32? This would be unique to my limited knowledge. Can you cite any other beers that might do this?

Dan

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Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5301
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.239.69
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 01:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If Dan and Scott can put aside their sniping at each other, IBUs are a measure (actually in parts per million or milligrams per liter) of isomerized alpha acid solubility in beer. Beers with higher IBUs have more isomerized alpha acids and therefore are perceived as being more bitter.

The problem is that bittering is a matter of perception, as are other components associated with hops. The three qualities (bittering, flavor and aroma) are associated together, and an increase in one tends to cause a perceived increase in the others. The extent to which this occurs varies a little among each person, and is very much affected by the timing of the hop addition. The more volatile aroma and flavor components are reduced by the temperature and the physical agitation during the boil, but even dry hops have a very small bittering contribution, as does the aroma of hops that are in the wort for the entire boil.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2767
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 01:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill, I think that you will agree that if a beer says that it has "X" IBUs, it ought to have the requisite "parts per million of isomerized alpha acid soluability" not merely to have had used that amount of hops without regard to how they were utilized which is what I believe Scott is insinuating.

Dan

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Ric Heinz
Intermediate Member
Username: Rheinz

Post Number: 367
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 64.154.26.251
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 01:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't remember it being bitter. In fact, I would call it on the sweet side. Seems the Widmer (on tap) is always served with a lemon. I have also enjoyed the Ruby Mountain Brewery - Hefeweizen, served on tap in Northern Nevada with an orange slice. Excellent!
Ric
Flatfender Brewing, NW Houston
 

Ric Heinz
Intermediate Member
Username: Rheinz

Post Number: 368
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 64.154.26.251
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 01:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh, yeah, thanks for the recipes and suggestions.

Based on your input, I'm planning on brewing two versions of this brew, an American version (similar to the Widmer) and a German version based on Scott's recipe.
Ric
Flatfender Brewing, NW Houston
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1915
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 01:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan,

thanks for spinning my words into nonsense and thanks for ruining yet another thread on this board with your stupid BS...



32 IBUs of straight 60 minute bittering hops are going to be more bitter and harsh to the taste that 32 IBUs of Flavor and Aroma hops that say have only been in the boil for 40 minutes or less.

The resulting beer with the 32 IBUs of just Flavor and Aroma hops will be a far smoother hop profile because of the way the oils break down in the boil.

-Scott
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2768
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Dan,

thanks for spinning my words into nonsense and thanks for ruining yet another thread on this board with your stupid BS... "

Scott, what an attitude?

"32 IBUs of straight 60 minute bittering hops are going to be more bitter and harsh to the taste that 32 IBUs of Flavor and Aroma hops that say have only been in the boil for 40 minutes or less.

The resulting beer with the 32 IBUs of just Flavor and Aroma hops will be a far smoother hop profile because of the way the oils break down in the boil. "

Can you cite a reference?

Dan

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MacGregor Outkast
Junior Member
Username: Macgregor

Post Number: 67
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 24.249.73.221
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

wow ... dan i kinda feel bad for you man.. hope your customers don't read this thread..
 

Ken Anderson
Senior Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 1516
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 69.168.141.10
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On the other hand, it would take several ounces of flavor and aroma hops to contribute the same level of bittering that one ounce of 60 minute hops would, IIRC.

Would that mess up this style of beer?
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2769
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Right on cue, Mac! Go get your biscuit.

Dan

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1916
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"it would take several ounces of flavor and aroma hops to contribute the same level of bittering that one ounce of 60 minute hops would"

Yes... exactly and the resulting beer would not be as bitter due to the hop utilization of the various additions...

 
Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

1.34 oz. Columbus Whole 17.00 32.0 60 min. (All Bittering Addition)

2.63 oz. Columbus Whole 17.00 32.0 30 min. (All Flavor Addition)

6.71 oz. Columbus Whole 17.00 32.0 10 min. (All Aroma Addition)


* The beer hopped with the bittering addition would have a pronounced bitterness, no flavor and no aroma

* The beer hopped with the Flavor addition would have a very subdued bitterness, mostly flavor and little to no aroma

* The beer hopped with the all Aroma addition would have no real perceived bitterness (more of a dry mouth feel to me), high flavor and a high end amount of aroma or floral qualities...

It is all bout the utilization and the break down of the oils in the boil...

-Scott
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2770
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So, Scott, you admit, an alpha acid isomertized later in the boil tastes the same as one isomertized earlier. The only difference is that a smaller percentage of the available acid has had time to isomertize. I somehow got the idea that you were saying that the bitterness would be different - smoother, not just less.

Dan

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Belly Buster Bob
Senior Member
Username: Canman

Post Number: 2531
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 131.137.245.198
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

what does "isomertized" mean?
Bellybuster Bob
www.bellybuster.netfirms.com
 

Doug J
Member
Username: Doug_j

Post Number: 205
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 207.250.116.151
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ISOMERTIZE! That must be one of those words that those "scienticians" use
Malam cerevisiam faeceus in cathedram stercoris
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1917
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 02:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan,

I admit that you did not understand my post...

A bittering unit is a bittering unit no matter what but the utilization of that said bittering unit is what is being discussed... The chemical breakdown and utilization is what is at hand here...

Your war on semantics is silly Dan-yo-san... Hops On... Hops Off...

-Scott
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2771
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good, we agree then, Scott, the bitterness of an alpha acid tastes the same, not "smoother," no matter when it is isomerized.

"Your war on semantics is silly Dan-yo-san... Hops On... Hops Off... "

Cute, not very diginfied, but cute.

Dan

(Message edited by listermann on May 02, 2006)

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1918
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 03:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan-yo-san Writes:

"Good, we agree then, Scott, the bitterness of an alpha acid tastes the same, not "smoother," no matter when it is isomertized."

I do not remember saying that... no... I do not...

(Message edited by skotrat on May 02, 2006)
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2772
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"if the 32 IBUs is made up of flavor and aroma hops then it quite possibly may have 32 IBUs

Maybe they are just not pushing the big 60 minute bittering hop path in the beer. "

And

"32 IBUs of straight 60 minute bittering hops are going to be more bitter and harsh to the taste that 32 IBUs of Flavor and Aroma hops that say have only been in the boil for 40 minutes or less.

The resulting beer with the 32 IBUs of just Flavor and Aroma hops will be a far smoother hop profile because of the way the oils break down in the boil. "

Maybe I just misread you . . or not.

Dan

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Steve Funk
Member
Username: Tundra45

Post Number: 179
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 209.216.169.218
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 08:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Beware <rant>
I am sick of you two bickering and rarely read threads full of your posts. Dan, you seem to be the antagonist most of the time and Skotrat is often quite smug. Both of you should get over it for the sake of the rest of us homebrewers. PM each other if you must keep at it, but please keep it out of this forum. BTW, I agree with what you're saying, Skotrat.

(edited for stoopid typos)
Thank you.
<rant>

(Message edited by tundra45 on May 02, 2006)
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2773
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.220.144
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 08:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Steve, how did I antagonize Scott?

Dan

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Paul Erbe
Advanced Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 548
Registered: 05-2001
Posted From: 12.37.128.66
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 09:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Steve you forgot the / in your second rant tag.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1924
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.61.120.214
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2006 - 10:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Steve,

I apologize.

-Scott
 

tim roth
Intermediate Member
Username: Hopdude

Post Number: 437
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 12.206.8.178
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 03:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Snippy snippmeisters!
When you can open the fridge, grab a beer and close the door, without the light ever coming on.....then you will have learned.
cheers,tim
You know I'm on the level because, my bubble is in the middle.
 

Patrick C.
Advanced Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 542
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 71.56.78.223
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 04:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could two beers with an identical IBU have a different perceived bitterness, due to the hopping schedule or other things? I think so.
 

Hallertauer
Intermediate Member
Username: Hallertauer

Post Number: 371
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 192.85.16.1
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 08:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

**When you can open the fridge, grab a beer and close the door, without the light ever coming on.....then you will have learned.**

I have learned then. The light on latch on my beer fridge is stuck 'in' with sticky beer sauce. So I must be a fucing genus
 

Belly Buster Bob
Senior Member
Username: Canman

Post Number: 2534
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 131.137.245.199
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 10:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

as far as the feud is concerned..I find it pure entertainment and think it should be encouraged. I am a better brewer due to one of the feudsters and I look like a genious due to the other.
Keep it up boys, I'm all in
As far as the whole hops bitterness, I don't confess to be a scientician but Patrick C. just summed it up.
Bellybuster Bob
www.bellybuster.netfirms.com
 

pilznbeenthere
New Member
Username: Pilznbeenthere

Post Number: 22
Registered: 12-2002
Posted From: 68.116.28.228
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 11:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Widmer was one of my first micro's as well.

Oregon style (or American) Hefe is an exceptionally easy beer to make, and goes down great as a summer thirst quencher. It's our version of lawnmower beer. Drinkable after just 2-3 week conditioning.

I don't have a promash recipe. Been doing this so long can do it blindfolded.

Basic version for 10 gal:

3.5 kg malted wheat
3.5 kg 2-row

mash 156F 90 min.
usually use 4 oz cascade hops interspersed thruout the boil.

American Hefe yeast

Ferment around 64F if possible.
transfer to keg, or bottle.

Innkeeper Vaclav Mirwald..."There is one thing we really need in Pilsn...good, cheap beer! (~1839)"
 

Ric Heinz
Intermediate Member
Username: Rheinz

Post Number: 371
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 64.154.26.251
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 01:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just a single infusion mash at 156?
Ric
Flatfender Brewing, NW Houston
 

Doug J
Member
Username: Doug_j

Post Number: 206
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 207.250.116.150
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My hefeweizen is the greatest hefe in the known world, but if you think I am going to give out the recipe to a bunch of homebrewers who will just tweak it and ruin it and add peated malt to it, you're crazy!

Besides, hefe isn't about the recipe, that part is simple. The fermentation profile is the important part.
Malam cerevisiam faeceus in cathedram stercoris
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4139
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 71.210.56.219
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rumor has it that Doug J's hefeweizen isn't fit to boil brats in.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5314
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.239.69
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 05:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug, you forgot the all-important kralpen.
 

Mike
Member
Username: Macker

Post Number: 208
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 171.72.5.226
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 05:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have had Doug J's hefe, and it is second to only to Campbell Brewing Company's hefe, formerly brewed in North Bend, WA.......

and chumley is just envious....
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 2195
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 167.4.1.38
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 05:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

BBB, that was a classic... :-)

I'd include willamette along with the cascades for pilz's recipe. Nice and simple...
 

Ken Anderson
Senior Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 1517
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 69.168.141.10
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 05:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"BBB, that was a classic... "

The "genious" part made it even better. Ah the irony...
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 2197
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 167.4.1.38
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 09:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bah, that's just the english way... :-)

isomertized = isomerized -> To cause to change into an isomeric form.

For you BBB : Variant: also British isom·er·ise

To answer the next question, an isomer is :

Any of two or more substances that are composed of the same elements in the same proportions but differ in properties because of differences in the arrangement of atoms.

/HopHead
 

Ken Anderson
Senior Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 1518
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 69.168.141.10
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 09:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually, I believe isomertization is the decrease in hop alpha acid over a period of time, as it becomes infused into the wort, thus creating IBU's. Very similar to amortization.
 

davidw
Senior Member
Username: Davidw

Post Number: 1529
Registered: 03-2001
Posted From: 65.163.6.62
Posted on Wednesday, May 03, 2006 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can a guy get a beer around here?
 

pilznbeenthere
New Member
Username: Pilznbeenthere

Post Number: 23
Registered: 12-2002
Posted From: 66.189.220.251
Posted on Thursday, May 04, 2006 - 12:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ric, I'm with Hophead regarding keeping things simple. This is a great summer beer without all the complexity. Sure, I've decocted it, used pilsner malt, hopped it up, stepped mash, etc. However, 156F mash is fine. Also, whether you worry about stuck mashes or not, a 50% wheat grainbill is a problem for some, and keeping a simple mash schedule nearly makes it a moot point.

Prost!

Innkeeper Vaclav Mirwald..."There is one thing we really need in Pilsn...good, cheap beer! (~1839)"
 

Tim Polster
Member
Username: Bassman

Post Number: 202
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 69.149.47.91
Posted on Thursday, May 04, 2006 - 04:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, sorry my comment started the ranting.

As far as the bittering or flavor/aroma debate.

The Widmer beer tastes fine, but I did not detect 32 bits of anything last time I had it.

The beer follows a normal wheat profile where hops are not the main taste ingredient.

Columbus with an alpha of 17 might fit this aroma example, but I can't see a brewery dumping a pound of a normal alpha (~5%) hop for a wheat beer.

But I could be wrong.
 

PaulK
Intermediate Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 373
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.84.198.40
Posted on Thursday, May 04, 2006 - 05:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

pilznbeenthere - My understanding is that Widmer uses somewhere in the 20-30% range of wheat so it seems your ratio is more in line with a traditional German hefeweizen. Considering that, the wheat should not pose an issue for lautering for most systems.