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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through June 11, 2006 * Infusion Mashing < Previous Next >

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David Landers
New Member
Username: David

Post Number: 17
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 69.137.134.124
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What happens when you do an infusion mash for 6 hours. I had fallen asleep while brewing last night. I just woke up and the pot is still hot.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5505
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.243
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 12:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Long conversions tend to produce a more fermentable wort; you may find your F.G. a point or two lower than it otherwise would be. However, the effect is generally not great.

Also, if the mash temperature dropped below about 125 F there may be some souring (not necessarily a bad thing for certain styles) from lactobacillus. Whether the temperature got that low depends on how well insulated your mash tun is.
 

David Landers
New Member
Username: David

Post Number: 18
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 69.137.134.124
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 01:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had done a temp reading right before I turned the heat back on. It was 124 F. I don't know how well that will sit with my wheat beer.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5506
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.243
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 02:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I suspect your beer will be just fine. Lacotbacillus just begins to function at 124 F, so it would not have been active for long. Moreover, a tiny bit of sourness in the finish would hardly be out of style. Also, wheat beers are generally not high in body, so the extra fermentability would be no problem.
 

Scott Manning
Intermediate Member
Username: Liquidbreaddiet

Post Number: 329
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 148.168.40.4
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 02:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wouldn't the boil kill off any bacteria? Less those pesky little spores
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5508
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.243
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 02:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, boiling will stop any further souring, but the souring that occurred before the boil would be preserved. Overnight (or longer) souring of the mash is the procedure used to brew "Kentucky common" and Berliner weisse.

However, as I said, it's unlikely there was much (or any) souring of David's mash if the temperature only dropped to 124 F after six hours.

(Message edited by BillPierce on May 30, 2006)
 

Tim Wi
Intermediate Member
Username: Riverkeeper

Post Number: 427
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 170.141.68.2
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If the mash remained covered the entire time, there likely was no souring at all.

T
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5512
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.243
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 09:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I might disagree with you, Tim. The grain husks contain a lot of lactobacillus, but it's really a matter of time and temperature.
 

dave star
Member
Username: Dave_star

Post Number: 126
Registered: 12-2004
Posted From: 66.245.71.220
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 04:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim you are correct, in order to get a sour mash to start after you have mashed at 147F for over an hour (600 PU) you would have to add a hand full of grains after you chill the mash to below 125F.

In distilling 'sour mash' is the process of using up to 1/3 of the stillage (i.e. the grains left after in the wash after fermentation & distilling) in the next batch of mash. The pH is low and it helps save water in the distillery.

(This is different from 'sour-mash' as done by beer brewers, where sour mash is made by allowing lacto bacillus bacteria to lower the pH of the mash before or during ferment. No distiller would ever add lacto or any other bacteria to his mash, for the reason that the bacteria lower the yield of ethanol. If you want to try making lacto culture take barley malt and soak/cover it with water and let it set for a day or two. You should smell a vinegar aroma, if not, toss it out and try again. Lacto bacillus live on grain)
Dave
 

Tim Wi
Intermediate Member
Username: Riverkeeper

Post Number: 428
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 170.141.68.2
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 12:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Dave.

David L, except for a few thermophiles, active bacteria (as opposed to spores) cannot withstand temps greater than 140. Any Lactobacillus acidophilus that were originally present in the grain of the mash would long since have departed to the happy petri dish.

So long as your mash remained covered, the mash should be free of any significant quantity of spoilers, even if it dropped to a more habitable temp over 6 hours.

T
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5515
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.243
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 01:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm willing to accept that the lactobacillus in the grain should have been killed during mashing at temperatures above 140 F.
 

Belly Buster Bob
Senior Member
Username: Canman

Post Number: 2562
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 131.137.245.199
Posted on Thursday, June 01, 2006 - 11:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

tons of folks do overnight mashes. I've done it myself with no negative effects. According to my notes, last overnight mash went 10 hours and dropped to 126 deg
Bellybuster Bob
www.bellybuster.netfirms.com