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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through September 22, 2006 * Pumpkin Apple Cyser < Previous Next >

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Tim C.
Junior Member
Username: Timc

Post Number: 92
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 24.192.6.164
Posted on Tuesday, September 05, 2006 - 01:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have an idea for an apple pumpkin cyser and wanted some critique.

5 gallon batch
Ingredients
10 pounds clover honey
5 gallons fresh apple juice (local grower)
6 lbs. (2.32.7 kg) pumpkin
3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp. ground cloves
1/4 tsp. ground ginger
1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
Cotes Des Blanc 1 packet

Roast pumpkin at 325 F for 30 minutes, scoop out and mix with apple juice. Mix in only 5 pounds of honey with spices and hold temperature at 160 F for 20 minutes. Cool to 70 F and pitch yeast. Allow to work for 5 to 7 days and add one pound of honey every 2 days for remaining 5 pounds. Allow to ferment in primary for 6 weeks. Rack off to secondary and allow to clarify additional 4 months. Bottle and age.

1.) Do the spices sound reasonable?
2.) Will the pumpkin and or apple add any flavor? I believe the apple variety are a sweet Macintosh.
3.) Would yeast nutrient be necessary? If added would it hurt?

Thanks for any and all comments.
 

PaulK
Advanced Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 509
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.84.198.40
Posted on Tuesday, September 05, 2006 - 02:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pumpkin is a waste. My input to anyone who wants to add something along the lines of pumpkin to a brew is to replace it with sweet potatoes and thereby add something with some flavor and sugar content. Pumpkins are watery and too vegetal tasting. Go for something better.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3311
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.220.144
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 12:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

For pumpkin beers, I say skip the gourd entirely and just use the spices. Beyond that, what is the point?

I did have a customer say that he intended to ferment his pumpkin beer in a pumpkin. I can't say that I have seen him since.

Dan

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Brad Petit
Member
Username: Voodoobrew

Post Number: 126
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 69.22.24.13
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 08:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How about taking a creme brule torch to the inside of a hollowed-out pumpkin and then using that as a secondary?
 

Liquidbreaddiet
Intermediate Member
Username: Liquidbreaddiet

Post Number: 413
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 148.168.40.4
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 01:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I actually think it sounds pretty freekin good. I have 5 lbs of carrot blossom honey that has the most incredible orange hue too it and I have been racking my brains to figure out the best way to use it. I might just follow your recipe but save myself the effort and used processed pumpkin.
i've been around the world and found that only stupid people are breeding!!!
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5886
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.66
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 01:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The canned pumpkin is all right and will contribute some orange color, although it slows the sparge somewhat. The canned pumpkin pie filling (a different product) contains a lot of added sugar.

I'm of the opinion that tweaking the malt bill slightly and adding a spice tea at flameout is a lot easier and produces just as good a beer (if you like that sort of thing). However, there are those who favor the flavor contribution (caramelization and Maillard reactions as well as a slight smoky quality) that comes from roasting chunks of pumpkin in the oven. It's clear that the extract potential of pumpkin is low and it will boost the gravity only slightly.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 2179
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.128.118.170
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 02:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

For pumpkin beers, I say skip the gourd entirely and just use the spices. Beyond that, what is the point?

Then it is not a pumpkin beer then is it?

Also... Tim is making a cyser


Eric Fouch and Nate Wall both make fantastic Pumpkin beers. Crazy old Eric actually mashes in the pumpkin and has never had any problems with it.

Bill is dead on about the canned pumpkin having a ton of sugar in it but at some of the good farmers markets and health food stores you can get organic pumpkin filling that is indeed all pumpkin.



-Scott
"Anger is a Gift"
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5887
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.66
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 02:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have seen Libbey's canned pumpkin in the supermarket. It contains no added sugar, in contrast to the pumpkin pie filling.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 2180
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.128.118.170
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 02:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You are correct Bill...

The can of Libbeys I have is straight up Pumpkin...

Nothing else
"Anger is a Gift"
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3314
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 02:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"For pumpkin beers, I say skip the gourd entirely and just use the spices. Beyond that, what is the point?

Then it is not a pumpkin beer then is it? "

No, but it would taste a whole bunch like pumpkin beer and be a lot easier to make. This just my harmless opinion. Please feel totally free to disagree with it to your heart's content.

As for cyser, I see not any enzymens to convert the pumpkin starch to sugar. This could be a problem.

Dan

(Message edited by listermann on September 06, 2006)

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Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 2181
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 24.128.118.170
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 02:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan,

Your thinking is exactly why there are laws against food makers marketing Appleless Apple Pies.

-Scott
"Anger is a Gift"
 

Liquidbreaddiet
Intermediate Member
Username: Liquidbreaddiet

Post Number: 415
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 148.168.40.4
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 03:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

mmmmmm.....appleless apple pies.....mmmmmmm

seriously - is there an easy way to convert the starch in processed pumpkin
i've been around the world and found that only stupid people are breeding!!!
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3316
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 03:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Your thinking is exactly why there are laws against food makers marketing Appleless Apple Pies."

Maybe I might need to go outside and disembowel myself, Scott. I am so very sorry to have upset your sensitivities yet again.

Listertroll

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MacGregor Outkast
Junior Member
Username: Macgregor

Post Number: 88
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 24.249.73.221
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 04:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

can we sell tickets as donation to the B&V?
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3317
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 04:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Another rat's paw. . .

Listertroll

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David Woods
Advanced Member
Username: Beericon

Post Number: 800
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 4.186.60.139
Posted on Wednesday, September 06, 2006 - 10:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Be different and make a Pumpkin Wit. The pumpkin color is VERY noticable and the spices go right along.

Mine was a hit 2 years ago.

David
 

Tim C.
Junior Member
Username: Timc

Post Number: 95
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 198.2.12.11
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 09:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is a bit of tradition with me where I make one cyser or mead annually at this time of year. Last year I made an apple cranberry cyser with cloves. Six pounds of fresh ground cranberries gave it a brilliant red color and the cloves balance it nice. I was all set to make this agian and thought of a different fall product (pumpkin). Sweet potatoes sound good as well. The main item I am trying to get opinions on are the spices (too much, too little, wrong kind, wrong time to add etc...). Thanks to those who have lent their help.
 

Bob Wall
Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 227
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 139.76.128.71
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 12:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan, your comment on disemboweling yourself made me laugh out loud.

That said, I tend to agree with Scot when it comes to truth in labeling, but only for Pro-Brewers. A Homebrewer can do WTF he or she wants.

At my old job, our Cherry Lager was nothing more than a 1/2 barrel of our regular Lager with 6 ounces of Jero Cherry syrup added before we filled the keg. I always felt uncomfortable about it, and felt that I was participating in misrepresentation.
Give a man a beer and he'll waste an hour. Teach a man to brew and he'll waste a lifetime.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3343
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.220.144
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 01:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You might be surprised what can be done with beer and raspberry Kool-Aid.

Dan

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Dave Coppes
New Member
Username: Pale_dave

Post Number: 21
Registered: 07-2006
Posted From: 71.192.169.59
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 01:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim - care to share the details of your cyser from last year? The apple cranberry with cloves. How did it turn out?
 

Tim C.
Junior Member
Username: Timc

Post Number: 96
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 198.2.12.11
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It was pretty easy.
4 gallons fresh apple juice (Macintosh?)
8 pounds clover honey
6 pounds fresh cranberries
8 cloves
Cotes Des Blanc 1 packet
1 tsp pectin enzyme
1 tsp yeast nutrient

Freeze cranberries ovenight and run trough food processor. Warm apple juice to 160 with honey, berries, and cloves for 30 minutes. Allow to cool and pitch yeast. Add yeast nutrient and pectin enzyme and age in primary at least 2 months. Rack off into secondary and age 6 to 9 months prior to bottling.

I tried to prime with corn sugar and repitch champane yeast but it did not carbonate. The berries add a bit of tartness and the cloves balance well. My only complaint is there is alot of sediment in the bottles.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5900
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.66
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 05:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Cranberries can be acidic, Tim, to the point where the low pH may have inhibited the yeast and prevented carbonation. You might have added enough calcium carbonate to bring the pH above 4.0 before priming and bottling. As for the sediment, sometimes it takes two or three rackings to get rid of almost all the fruit residue.

(Message edited by BillPierce on September 08, 2006)