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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through October 11, 2006 * CAPs and budmilloors < Previous Next >

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David Lewinnek
Intermediate Member
Username: Davelew

Post Number: 269
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 209.6.23.54
Posted on Sunday, October 08, 2006 - 03:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just got this article forwarded to me from my mother:

http://www.powells.com/review/2006_10_07.html

At first, I thought it was going to be a praise of the Classic American Pilsener article, but then I realized it was actually saying "CAPs are good so drink Bud Light." Anyone else care to count the factual errors? I get nine.
 

Mike G.
Junior Member
Username: Mikeg

Post Number: 63
Registered: 04-2005
Posted From: 64.68.174.243
Posted on Sunday, October 08, 2006 - 06:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting. Sounds like the children's story- " emperor Adolphus's new clothes".

My favorite quote from the review: "The big breweries got big by caring about consistency, and using more expensive ingredients than the cheap malts and hops used by failed brewers."

Random thoughts:

Did the German immigrants bring doppelbock brewing with them? I always thought they brought pilsner brewing with them.

Did the original Bohemian Pilseners made in Budweis include Rice? I am no expert, but I would think otherwise.

Did Budweiser always use rice in the recipe? Or did they use corn at one time? I read recently that Michelob used an all-malt formula at one time, and now is a rice-adjunct brew.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2466
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 03:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One - The first brewers in America were German,

Two - You can't make pilsener with American six-row barley, because it's too protein rich. You end up with unprecipitated blobs of protein, sort of like drinking a lava lamp.

Never heard chill haze described as a lava lamp before
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 5918
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 06:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"The first brewers in America were German"...weren't they British? Ya know, the Plymouth Rock/beer story. How about Washington/Jefferson/Franklin?
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4373
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 08:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"In the late 1800s a temperance movement started gaining momentum. Interestingly, lager was previously not considered alcoholic, as it only had a 3.2 percent alcohol content."

Ummmmm....all the CAP data (with historical references) I've seen published in various homebrewing articles do not agree with this.
 

Paul Erbe
Advanced Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 699
Registered: 05-2001
Posted From: 12.27.22.67
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not to mention that there was probably some form of chicha brewed in at least Mexico if not the southern united states for thousands of years.