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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through December 05, 2006 * Dry Yeast for SSOS < Previous Next >

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Little Dipper
Member
Username: Littledipper

Post Number: 131
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 70.226.89.210
Posted on Sunday, November 12, 2006 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm brewing up an SSOS as I type this (it's mashing). I've brewed this once before using WL Burton Ale yeast and loved it. However, my yeast starter (fairly old yeast) just doesn't appear to have taken - I think my yeast is past it's prime. I've got a packet of Nottingham and a packet of Windsor and I've never used either. Any recommendations on which to use for this beer?
 

Norm J
New Member
Username: Norm_j

Post Number: 25
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 71.104.178.132
Posted on Sunday, November 12, 2006 - 06:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Windsor will probably finish higher FG. I've only used Nottingham once in an IPA and didn't like the flavors it produced for that style, but I think it would be perfect for a stout. I've heard from others who love it in stouts.
 

Norm J
Junior Member
Username: Norm_j

Post Number: 26
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 71.104.178.132
Posted on Sunday, November 12, 2006 - 06:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By the way, when I read your post I interpreted SSOS as Sam Smith Oatmeal Stout, but I note others are using SSOS for the sister star IPA. Is that what your referring to?
 

Little Dipper
Member
Username: Littledipper

Post Number: 132
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 70.226.89.210
Posted on Sunday, November 12, 2006 - 07:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh yeah, sorry about that. I should have been more specific. It is Sister Star of the Sun.

I ended up pitching my Burton. I had made a starter back on Wednesday (4 days ago) and it appeared to be o.k. My usual operation is to stick it in the fridge the night before, decant the liquid in the morning, then boil some first runnings and add them to the yeast for a little wake-up before pitching. When I decanted this morning I was less than overwhelmed with the slurry remaining, but I don't use english yeasts a lot and I know they have a little different appearance than american ale yeasts (maybe a little darker and runnier looking).

Anyways, I thought I'd give it a shot, so we'll see what happens. Hit all my numbers, though, otherwise. Thanks for the input.
 

Marlon Lang
Advanced Member
Username: Marlonlang

Post Number: 640
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 74.230.198.116
Posted on Tuesday, November 14, 2006 - 12:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've used dry yeast exclusively for the last two years and if your choice is only between Winsor or Nottingham, I would opt for Nottingham. Sister Star is a big beer and the extra attenuation of Nottingham would seem to better fit the IBUs. YMMV Some others you might consider would be US-56 (same as W1056 or WLP001), or maybe T58.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4407
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Tuesday, November 14, 2006 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, I can report that US56 makes a great IPA. Dean Larson SNCA, Pliny the Elder, Dogfish 90, you name it, every IIPA recipe I have tried it in has come out great.

Since US56 came out, my packets of Nottingham have been languishing in the fridge, to be only used when I need to bottle condition a big beer that has been sitting in the primary/secondary a long time.

Given the choice between Windsor and Nottingham, I too would chose Nottingham.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 2011
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Tuesday, November 14, 2006 - 04:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am fermenting my second batch of SSOS with US56 and can say that it is darn good with US56.
 

Little Dipper
Member
Username: Littledipper

Post Number: 134
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 206.114.61.199
Posted on Tuesday, November 14, 2006 - 05:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you all. I was leaning toward Nottingham to begin with because of the higher gravity beer and the reports that Windsor is a low attenuator. I've never used either, but I picked them up once to have on hand in special situations.

You'll all be glad to know that the beer is bubbling away nicely, so my Burton must have been in better shape than I thought. You can all sleep soundly now.
 

Andrew Bales
Intermediate Member
Username: Bales

Post Number: 381
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 65.28.53.99
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 12:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That is interesting, I always keep a pack of windsor around becase I can't stand the taste of nottingham. but to each their own.

How does US56 taste compared to WLP001?
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 2021
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Never used WLP001 so I have no idea, but US56 does make a good SSOS.

-Doug