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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2007 * Archive through January 09, 2007 * A new brewer with a question....... < Previous Next >

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Allen Von Eye
New Member
Username: Ajvoneye

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2007
Posted From: 137.86.253.254
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 07:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just brewed my first batch of beer last night, a simple lager, and today I have yet to see any sign of fermentation. Is this a big concern? I have read that it can take up to 48 hours for before lager yeast start to ferment, but I was just curious. I used dry yeast and I have it at a suitable temperature. Any thoughts? Thanks.

Allen
 

Graham Cox
Advanced Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 828
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 07:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No, Allen, 24+ hours is not cause for concern with a lager, especially if you just sprinkled dry yeast into the fermenter without rehydrating it.

I would start to be a bit concerned after about 36 hours with no signs of activity.
 

Craig Henry
Intermediate Member
Username: Sail

Post Number: 404
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 136.181.195.8
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 08:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you used decent yeast that was in-date, I wouldn't worry. The advantage in a rapid take off would be to reduce the chance of infection.

I have had it take several days at times for dry yeast or small starters. If you have used good sanitation practices, things will be fine.
 

Ron Siddall
Intermediate Member
Username: El_cid

Post Number: 251
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 198.135.241.18
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 08:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Allen, I would be interested in finding out how this beer turns out for you.

Keep us posted.
This space open to interpretation
 

michael atkins
Advanced Member
Username: Mga

Post Number: 505
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 63.230.44.174
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 08:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Allen - Congratulations on your first brew. Keep that lager at the recommended fermentation temperatures and you will be all right.
Love This Hobby!

http://msnusers.com/micksbrewery
 

Hedgie Bartol
Member
Username: Hedgieb

Post Number: 143
Registered: 04-2004
Posted From: 208.228.181.247
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 04:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Now I have a question... I just brewed my Oktoberfest again (it was a hit, so why not). I used dry yeast, sprinkled in as the wort was flowing into the carboy... Well, my fermentation was evident within the hour... I usually have at least 24 hours before I get a good start... any cause for concern with fermentation starting that soon?
 

Liquidbreaddiet
Advanced Member
Username: Liquidbreaddiet

Post Number: 556
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 148.168.40.4
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

NO - unless your wort was at too high a temp
"If I'm not supposed to eat animals, why are they made out of meat?"
 

Hedgie Bartol
Member
Username: Hedgieb

Post Number: 144
Registered: 04-2004
Posted From: 208.228.181.247
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 06:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nah. It was down below 80 degrees...
 

Craig Henry
Intermediate Member
Username: Sail

Post Number: 406
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 136.181.195.8
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 08:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

80 Degrees can make for a very ale-y tasting brew. I would think Ale yeast would take off quickly at such a warm temp but I wouldn't recommend this temp for fermentation.
 

Joakim Ruud
Intermediate Member
Username: Joques

Post Number: 500
Registered: 10-2005
Posted From: 84.209.10.232
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 08:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'd have though that was a bit of irony from Hedgie :-)
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6115
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 74.60.30.238
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 08:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hedgie, my experience is that's way too warm to pitch an ale, let alone a lager. I get better results when I cool to fermentation temp or even a couple degrees below before pitching.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Jon Steinhauer
Senior Member
Username: Jstein6870

Post Number: 1029
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 70.100.85.151
Posted on Saturday, January 06, 2007 - 01:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How come none of these new brewers with questions ever come back and say "Hey, thanks for the response," or the like?



Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm...
Steinhauer
 

Rob Beck
Intermediate Member
Username: Robbeck

Post Number: 314
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 66.142.56.227
Posted on Saturday, January 06, 2007 - 08:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Maybe they don't like the answers.
 

Hedgie Bartol
Member
Username: Hedgieb

Post Number: 145
Registered: 04-2004
Posted From: 71.75.216.230
Posted on Saturday, January 06, 2007 - 04:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey now! I generally say thanks!

Now from what I have heard and understood, you wanted your wort to be around 75 degrees to pitch, then continue lowering to optimum fermentation temps? I am always afraid for an infection in the wort when I wait so long to pitch... I do a 10 gal boil and use a wort chiller with one chiller in ice, and the other in the wort... It still takes a good solid hour to chill down... any thoughts?
 

Graham Cox
Advanced Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 839
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Saturday, January 06, 2007 - 05:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think most brewers agree that it is better to get your wort very near the desired fermentation temperature before pitching the yeast, whether it be an ale or a lager. There are variations on this theme, of course, depending on the yeast profile desired, but it is generally accepted that you should be near the desired temperature.

I have high ground water temperature year-round and it takes me a long time to chill my wort using a 50' immersion chiller and a 50' prechiller packed in ice. You can speed this process up considerably by moving your immersion chiller around in the pot periodically to keep the wort moving over the coils rather than stratifying in layers in the pot. (There is a good article by Jamil Zainasheff in the latest "Zymurgy" on an interesting technique he has utilizes.)

So long as you are reasonably careful with your wort and keep it enclosed after chilling, there is no reason to be concerned about infection for a few hours. I routinely chill my lagers in one of my fridges for several hours before pitching because I can't get them any lower than the low 60's using my chiller setup.
 

robert rulmyr
Advanced Member
Username: Wacobob

Post Number: 872
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.188.241.153
Posted on Saturday, January 06, 2007 - 06:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I still post a question now and then...usually end it with a TIA. ( over 100 batches brewed )
 

Hedgie Bartol
Member
Username: Hedgieb

Post Number: 148
Registered: 04-2004
Posted From: 208.228.181.247
Posted on Saturday, January 06, 2007 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good idea, Rob! Let me say TIA and TIP (Thanks In the Past). This site has always been a great source of info for me... if I neglected to say it before or at any time in the future, I sincerely do appreciate the advice!
Thanks for the input Graham. I will relax a bit regarding infection and focus on temp more.
 

ELK
Senior Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 1750
Registered: 01-2003
Posted From: 71.195.244.40
Posted on Sunday, January 07, 2007 - 03:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just wondering if Hedgie really thinks under 80 is ok??
It may or may not be a joke? I have met several brewers who think this. Most of the yeast packs say to start you temps in the 70's and over 80 can kill them so I can see where folks may get this mantra.

Nah. It was down below 80 degrees...

The problem with that is most new guys don't understand that for the first 2-3 days the internal temps in the carboy might be 8 degrees warmer than the outside temp strip shows. I suggest everyone strap a towel or other insulator onto the carboy over the temp strip and note the difference.

I try to go right to my target ferment temps while cooling. I know the temptations though.
Rip them lips!