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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2007 * Archive through October 20, 2007 * Harmful to leave hops bines up through fall? < Previous Next >

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teetotaler
New Member
Username: Nephi

Post Number: 18
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 162.116.29.69
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2007 - 09:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In southern California many summer annuals can last well into fall (I've had many two year old tomato plants) as a frost is a rare event. Is there any danger in leaving the hops bines up until they wither on their own? There are still a few small cones on the plant that might get bigger, so why cut it down?
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 7827
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.225.170
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2007 - 09:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would cut the bines before or about the time of the late fall/early winter rains in your part of the world, but otherwise I don't believe you have anything to worry about.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6484
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2007 - 09:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I got lazy last year and didn't cut mine til spring...no problem.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 1150
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 71.204.51.87
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2007 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You don't need to cut them down now, but I would recommend cutting them down once they have all withered. You don't really NEED to cut them, but it is a good idea to cut them back after they wither so you can put a couple inches of mushroom compost and topsoil down, so by the time Spring comes around, you have plenty of nutrients in the soil for the rhizomes to enjoy.

Also, I didn't cut mine last Fall. I finally got around to it in the Spring after the first shoots popped out, and when I was cutting the bines, I found a rabbit's nest. I don't think they were eating the shoots, but they were certainly digging into the roots. I had my boys relocate them to the creek.

Gonna cut mine in the next few weeks.
 

David Spaedt
New Member
Username: Crockett

Post Number: 19
Registered: 06-2007
Posted From: 205.160.53.142
Posted on Saturday, October 13, 2007 - 04:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I could be wrong but I believe I was listening to a podcast from The Brewing Network with the guest being the guy (sorry, the name escapes me) from hop union and he said you should let them wither and then cut. I believe the advantage was it allowed the roots to reasorb something.

I think he said cutting them early would still work but it was better to let them die and then cut them back.

(Message edited by crockett on October 13, 2007)
 

Ron Siddall
Intermediate Member
Username: El_cid

Post Number: 423
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 69.225.91.176
Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007 - 01:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let nature tell you when to take them down. That is usually when the vines die off.
 

Tom Viemont
Junior Member
Username: Vantas

Post Number: 65
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 206.105.78.10
Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007 - 01:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I haven't grown hops yet, but I'm planning to in the spring. Based on my experience with other perennial plants, I'd cut down the spent bines and remove any leaf litter or other debris from around the base of the plants. Pests and disease overwinter in the decaying plant matter.

I'd lay down a good inch or two of fresh, high quality compost, then, I'd cover the compost with a nice layer of shredded leaves or grass clippings as mulch.

My compost pile has become primarily shredded leaves and spent grains from my all-grain batches. After I spent grains to the pile, I give the pile a good turn so I can mix in the grains.
 

Pat Babcock
Moderator
Username: Pbabcock

Post Number: 183
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 136.2.1.101
Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007 - 07:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Crimony! I've left my cascades bines go for the past seven seasons here in Michigan, and I'm now firm in the belief that a trampling by the four horsemen of the apocalypse couldn't harm these things! I think I'll cut them back this winter, only because I'm losing too much real estate to them.
Pat Babcock
HBD Chief of Janitorial Services
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 7843
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.225.170
Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007 - 08:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yep, my compost pile has benefited greatly from leaves (two big trees in the front yard) and spent grain. Now next spring I just have to plant some hop rhizomes that will live.
 

Tony Legge
Intermediate Member
Username: Boo_boo

Post Number: 294
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 142.162.87.164
Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007 - 10:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just usually cut them back to ground level and cover them with horse manure.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 1160
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 139.76.128.71
Posted on Monday, October 15, 2007 - 10:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One other plus to cutting them down after withering is weed control. Down here in the South, we get weeds year round and having the bines cut back makes it easier to see them so you can pick them as they sprout.