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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2008 * Archive through August 26, 2008 * Munton's dry yeast < Previous Next >

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jeff wright
Member
Username: Barly

Post Number: 217
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 24.131.110.190
Posted on Friday, July 25, 2008 - 10:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I know, I'm probably the only brewer that uses this yeast, but does anyone know if the strain of this yeast has been changed in the last year? The only beer that I brew with this yeast has been souring as it ferments and ages (last two batches). This is the only beer that I use this yeast, and it's the only one that is souring on me. I think I'm going to switch to Windsor instead of the Muntons. What do you think???
Any info or insight would be appreciated.

Brew on,
jeff
 

gregory gettman
Advanced Member
Username: Gregman

Post Number: 670
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 204.60.184.1
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2008 - 01:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use it often and have had no souring.
Fruit like when fermented high, malty-wood when fermented low. Truly an over looked yeast.

I would check something in your process?
 

jeff wright
Member
Username: Barly

Post Number: 218
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 24.131.110.190
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2008 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Greg,
This was my go-to yeast for this beer because it left some residual sweetness. Now, these beers are souring, and it just seems to be the beer that I use the munton's in. Did an American Pale Ale (using Nottingham) after the Munton's brew and it seems fine. I don't know, but I've got to try something.

Thanks again,
brew on,
jeff
 

gregory gettman
Advanced Member
Username: Gregman

Post Number: 671
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.134.224.92
Posted on Sunday, July 27, 2008 - 04:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let it sour for a year or two. You may have a Oud bruin in the making???
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 3305
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 74.7.7.66
Posted on Monday, July 28, 2008 - 06:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did the pale ale with the Nottingham get fermented in the same fermentor as the one that soured? If it did then that would seem to rule out the fermentor and anything else that was common to the 2 batches.

Was the sour vinegar like? That can come from grain dust or fruit fly contamination. I had a stout last year that sat too long and the airlock dried out. It was vinegar and I'm pretty sure it was from fruit flies getting in through the dry airlock.
 

jeff wright
Member
Username: Barly

Post Number: 219
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 24.131.110.190
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 11:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vance,
Hard to tell. I have four fermenters that rotate between primaries and secondaries. I would say it was 50/50 that the same fermenter was used somewhere in the process. I just brewed up another batch of this beer, but used Windsor yeast, so we'll see what happens.

brew on,
jeff
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 3310
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 74.7.7.66
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 07:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think it's much more likely that the problem is with a piece of equipment than a brand of dry yeast. Unless the yeast has been abused in storage.
 

jeff wright
Member
Username: Barly

Post Number: 220
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 24.131.110.190
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 09:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vance,
I agree, but this second batch that is souring is still in the secondary, and, from what I've heard, lacto and brett take longer than this to show up. The beer that is kegged has been sitting for months, and the taste is, well, lemony.
It could be that my taster is just "imagining" the tartness in the batch that is in secondary, but in this "Windsor" batch, that was just brewed I'm getting the old slightly sweet taste (maltiness).
I'll keep you updated.

brew on,
jeff