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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2008 * Archive through August 26, 2008 * 90F wort out of counterflow chiller ?? < Previous Next >

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Joe Rovito
Member
Username: Joez8

Post Number: 206
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 24.16.0.14
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 04:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Don't know why. Normally hit 60-70F. Anybody ever reverse the hose / chill water connections? Maybe that's what happened. I may have been distracted.
 

ChriSto
Intermediate Member
Username: Christo

Post Number: 402
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 216.176.226.154
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 11:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What's the temp of your water right now? That's your limiting factor on a chiller, maybe +/- 5 degF of that. My tap water in GA is around 80F, so I don't try to get much below 90F with my IC. I then start a recirc pump in ice water.
 

Chris Storey
Junior Member
Username: Stuts

Post Number: 64
Registered: 07-2004
Posted From: 76.75.115.157
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 01:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I did just that two weeks ago. I reversed the in and out water connections and the wort was 80F. I don't have a thermonator, but I always feel the SS coupling that directs the cooled wort into the fermenter. It was warm. I checked the picture of my shirron chiller and realized my connections were reversed. I hope to not make that mistake again.

Chris
 

Kent Porter
New Member
Username: Kporter

Post Number: 7
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 69.58.249.133
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had a similar incident last week with my plate chiller. I had reversed the wort in/out connections. I didn't think about it at the time, but I wonder if reversing the water connections would have helped - didn't want to mess with wort connections mid-stream. I instead slowed the wort transfer way down and ran the water full blast which got me down to 80-ish. Part of the problem was I had invited a new brewer over to observe the all-grain process and got distracted talking and explaining. For me, brewing always seems to go better as a solitary exercise.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5723
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 05:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I prefer to brew alone.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 1611
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 71.204.51.87
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 03:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I brewed two weeks ago and had to pre-chill my water using my old immersion chiller in a bucket of ice. I live in GA as does ChriSto and I was only able to get my beer down to 80 until my brew buddy ran to the store and got a couple bags of ice.

I use a Therminator.

When I worked at the brewery, we had a secondary chiller we'd use during the summer months...and that was in Wisconsin. So I would venture to guess your tap water temp is the issue and if you have a fermenting fridge, and you are at least at 80 or below, you should be fine to pitch.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5724
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 01:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

With the two barrel system and water temperatures as they are now, I recirculate the wort back into the brew pot from the CFC until it is about 95 F. Then I split the chiller and run about 25 F glycol from the three 15 gallon barrels in the freezer through the upper portion of the chiller while I fill the fermenters. Still it comes in around 80 and needs further cooling with the jacket to get to 68 F. Summer brewing here seems like an ordeal from this perspective.
 

Kent Porter
New Member
Username: Kporter

Post Number: 8
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 69.58.249.133
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In my case, the problem was the reversed wort connections. Summertime water temp is about 60F. When set up correctly, my chiller delivers wort out at ~65F without opening the hose bib all the way.

I still wonder if the chilling properties would be affected if you reversed both the wort and the water connections (so that the two fluids would still be flowing in opposite directions). But I don't wonder enough to actually try it.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9083
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 69.157.27.182
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 05:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Even my cool Lake Ontario water (currently about 65 F as it comes from the tap) isn't quite cold enough for chilling lagers at this time of year.

As has been mentioned, you can prechill the water using an immersion chiller in a bucket of ice. If your primary chiller is also an immersion chiller, it's best to chill the wort to below 90 F before using the prechiller.

Prechilling the water can use a lot of ice. More efficient is to use a second immersion chiller as a post-chiller for the wort. Immerse the chiller in the bucket of ice and run wort through it. It requires a bit more work to clean and sanitize the chiller, but it uses much less ice because the volume of wort is much smaller than that of the chilling water.
 

Vince Turley
Intermediate Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 308
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 192.91.173.42
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 06:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Last weekend I was brewing with 24 other brew teams at our annual "Iron Mash" competition (loosely patterned after the Iron Chefs show) that is held in the parking lot of Rahr & Sons Brewer (Fort Worth, TX). Temps hit 104oF, and water coming out of the hose was 85oF+ (that is, if you could even get a hose... with 24 teams, water an electricity demands were at a premium).

I went to the competition with a new idea... to use my Mash Tun as my cold water source, and drain this through my convoluted counter-flow chiller. Worked fantastic. During the boil I rinsed out the MLT, put in 30 lbs. of ice and topped it off with water. After the boil I recirculated the wort for 5 minutes to set a good filter bed, then opened up the MLT - 65oF wort went directly into the fermenters. I'll start making this a part of my regular regime, it was so simple
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 3311
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 74.7.7.66
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 07:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do simular to VT but with an IC. I use an old cooler MT to put the ice and water in and then use the March pump to recirculate it through the IC. I can get it down to about 55 in 30-45 minutes. Ales I can cool in 20-30 minutes. I don't switch to the ice water until the kettle is in the 100-120 range. And I run the tap water through the hose and pump so it's already primed when I switch the hose to the cooler.