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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2008 * Archive through August 26, 2008 * Light Beer - What is the Attraction? < Previous Next >

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Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5752
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 02:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My wife, who disdains beer, thinks that light beer verses real beer is like Pepsi verses Coke. This got me thinking about why anyone would desire a light beer. I see light beer more as Mad Dog verses fine wine.

First, I think a lot of Americans don't think beer should taste good and is there to get drunk on. Considering the blandness of American beer and the poor storage it has to endure, this might be an understandable position. I think that a beer with even less flavor is sought out to avoid the poor experience regular beer delivered. Of course drinking it ice cold helps avoid flavor a lot.

They seem to believe that any other beer, say darker, simply must be worse than the beer they choked down to get drunk.

Tomorrow we marry off our oldest daughter. Our first sale of beer is to her wedding. I have given the bartender orders that if anyone asks for a light beer, they are to be offered a glass of water.
 

Ted Hausotter
New Member
Username: Lagerman

Post Number: 9
Registered: 07-2008
Posted From: 190.166.66.84
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 02:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Cheers to water lite! My solution is to give them the beer of my choice in a glass that has lights in the bottom, a true light beer.
 

Ryan Messenger
Member
Username: Rem

Post Number: 116
Registered: 10-2007
Posted From: 74.34.7.108
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 02:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I love how the light beer fad was even shunned by Americans, until the advertising campaign got the right slogan... "Tastes great, less filling." Even the average American drunk was able to figure out that light beer wasn’t better, until advertising fooled the them into thinking that light beer equaled good beer.

Remind me again, why is it that democracy (popular, uneducated opinion) is good?
 

Tom Meier
Advanced Member
Username: Brewdawg96

Post Number: 827
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 75.137.121.197
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 03:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As hot as its been this summer, and being woefully abject of homebrew <10%abv until just recently, I've been appreciating Victory Wit, Sweetwater Hummer, and even the cheaply reliable PBR..

Being a rabid craftbeer enthusiast its feels wrong somehow to enjoy drinking a PBR, but I do.

What I like most is being able to have more than one without having all the sugar screw up my low sugar diet and get me feeling tired and bloated.

As much as I hate to admit it, even light beer does have its place in the world. There is a reason it sells so well. As the belgians say about their highly attenuated beers, they are more 'digestible'
 

Brad Petit
Intermediate Member
Username: Voodoobrew

Post Number: 343
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 24.88.127.90
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 05:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Some people genuinely do like light beer, even after having been educated on their choices. Ultimately I neither begrudge a person's choice of drink nor take personal umbrage at it. Dan, your instructions to the bartender, though on some level altruistic and perhaps humorously intended, may smack some people as patronizing. You can bet people don't go to weddings to have their tastes insulted by the booze jockey. I myself was at a wedding last month which featured a real jerk of a bartender. It did not sit well with me or my fellow guests.

Full disclosure: I enjoy the occasional $1 Natty Light at our local dive. Just gotta drink that puppy before it gets above, oh, 35 degrees. I am certainly not above drinking some macro-swill from time to time (it helps immensely if I didn't pay for it), but I will say that I have yet to feel any desire whatsoever to brew my own.
 

Tony Legge
Intermediate Member
Username: Boo_boo

Post Number: 363
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 72.139.4.145
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Personally, I like almost any beer, be it homebrewed or mega swill. Although not a big fan of Bud light or Coors Light, almost any other mega brew would be welcome at my table.

Perhaps being somewhat beer/homebrew educated and not having my taste buds burnt out by constantly drinking beer over 60 IBU's makes my appreciation of a swill beer even more so.

I wonder if it is just that I'm more used to drinking Canadian mega brews than American ones? Having said that, a number of years ago before I seriously homebrewed, we had a srtike of all the local brewerys and the LCBO imported American Old Milwalkee and Lone Star. They didn't taste much different than what I was used to at the time.

Since that time, I have drank many a homebrewed beer, both made by myself and others, and love the taste of a light brew as well as a highly hopped and a high IBU beer and have come to enjoy the differences in each.

Were it my daughter getting married, I would think that I would try to make it as enjoyable an evening as I could and not to force anyone to drink what I choose to serve them, but rather have on hand what most people enjoy drinking, just in case someone REALLY wanted something else. Just my .02 Dan.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5753
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 03:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I now own a brewery, I will not serve swill at my daughter's wedding.

I don't feel that mere advertizing is the draw to light beer. I feel it is a means to overcome fear of flavor. "Tastes bland, more intoxicating" is probably not going to sell much, but it is accurate description of light beer.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9125
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 03:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

People drink light beer for any number of reasons. Some are lured by advertising, some don't know any better, some don't much like the taste of beer itself, some want to slake their thirst without feeling the effects of strong beers, and others want a buzz while believing they don't really have a drinking problem.

Dan, as has been suggested here, a wedding is a time for celebrating an event in people's lives, not for making a political point. Serve what your guests want and hope that everyone has a good time. I'm trying to put this politely, but it's not about you.

(Message edited by billpierce on August 16, 2008)
 

Michael
Advanced Member
Username: Hoppop

Post Number: 881
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 24.74.166.143
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 03:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I agree with Tom M. that light beer does have it's place... Here in the South, after a long Saturday of yard work in mid-90 weather, and mid 90% humidity, a mega-swill does taste good....an 80 IBU, 7% abv IPA won't..

Conversely, a Scottish ale is a perfect brew for "me" when the crisp fall air rolls in...

We belong to a "dinner" club and end up hosting 10 or so couples twice a year (hey, we get 10 dinners in exchange)....I always provide a selection of my homebrew, with some mega-swill. The homebrew routinely gets all consumed, however, I think it is important to give a "guest" a choice. Although, at the dinner we hosted last weekend, I had two kegs of homebrew, and iced down two cases of mega-swill....I still have two cases of mega-swill in my garage fridge!
 

Brad Petit
Intermediate Member
Username: Voodoobrew

Post Number: 344
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 24.88.127.90
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> I now own a brewery, I will not serve swill at my daughter's wedding.

I understand where you're coming from. I'd like to think that if and when I get married, it'd be the same story. But, I don't think the proper tack would be to essentially tell people, "Your tastes are shite, here, drink this water instead you fool." How about: "Sorry, sir, we don't have (BudMillerCoors), but I think you'll really enjoy (X)."

X could be Spaten Helles, Flying Dog Tire Bite, Full Sail Session, Sierra Nevada Summerfest, Warsteiner, canned (or otherwise unskunked) Heineken or PU... plenty of options that swill-drinkers would actually enjoy.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9126
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 04:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Change happens slowly, but it is occurring. For 30 years I've been riding my bicycle across Iowa each July, a predominantly middle-American place with mainstream values and tastes. When I first began you could count on finding PBR almost everywhere, that and perhaps Miller Light. Things went from bad to worse (in my opinion) as these were replaced by "we have both kinds: Bud and Bud Light." If you asked for an import or microbrew you received blank stares.

Today there are alternative choices: Sam Adams Boston Lager, Blue Moon, Michelob Amber Bock, Fat Tire and Guinness, not everywhere but in a surprising number of locations. In more progressive Midwestern cites you can find Bell's Oberon, Boulevard Wheat, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and even bottles of Belgian Trappist ales. In the area where I live now in Canada it's Guinness, Hoegaarden and Leffe Blonde (and sometimes nitro widget cans of English ale because of the British influence), not wildly exciting but not exactly swill.

Our bike club once consumed more than a half-barrel keg a day of whatever megaswill we could find, PBR if we were lucky, Budweiser or Miller Lite if we were not. This year we still went through through about four cases daily of light beer in cans, but we also drank SNPA, Summit Hefe Weizen, Great Dane Porter, Lake Louie's strong scotch ale, New Belgium's 1554, and my own CAP and English mild ale. We were fortunate to have a 5-gallon keg of St. Bernardus 12 (from a trendy bar in Madison, WI) that disappeared in less than three hours.

Things are improving; it requires patience and taking the long view.

(Message edited by BillPierce on August 16, 2008)
 

Don Lund
Member
Username: Donlund

Post Number: 113
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 71.163.237.133
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 05:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I met my wife in a Welsh pub, she worked there, has had a lot of exposure to good beer. She also lived in Germany for nine years, more exposure to good beer. She samples all my homebrews, usually doesn't like them, but she'll give me valued feedback concerning what she tastes. Now in her sixties, I think she has has a taste for beer that deserves respect. And what we have found -- something she didn't realize herself -- is that she does not like the taste of hops. So she prefers beer that is very lightly hopped, Miller Lite is her favorite.

Is there something wrong with that? So wrong as to be offered water? What do you expect to accomplish by this? I just don't get it...
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5754
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Maybe I will call the bartender off, but I still won't serve swill. My family (huge) is used to the beers I make and appreciate them. The grooms brothers have made beer and know better.

I really want to understand the huge draw to light beer. As Bill points out, there may be many reasons, but I also know there is probably one big one. I think it is the fear of beer flavor cultivated by blander and blander beer.

My doctor says that if I don't start to suffering fools gladly in two weeks, he will double the medication's dose.

(Message edited by listermann on August 16, 2008)
 

Don Lund
Member
Username: Donlund

Post Number: 114
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 71.163.237.133
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 08:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Seeking the one big reason? Women.

I think that beer is no longer "A man's drink", and most women seem to prefer, well, girlie beers. Same with wines and mixed drinks, keep it light and easy. This transfers to men who date women, you don't want to get plowed and piss her off, so you drink light also. Then you marry her and by then you are used to the stuff, have no money so you buy what's cheapest. Eventually, BMC is "beer" and the micro's taste funny. No conspiracy, just evolution.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5755
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 08:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can anybody defend Michelob Ultra?
 

Skotrat
Advanced Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 756
Registered: 07-2007
Posted From: 75.67.98.168
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 09:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Michelob Ultra is not a bad beverage for what it is...

It has flavor, some body and even a little hop aroma.

You could do worse
 

Brad Petit
Intermediate Member
Username: Voodoobrew

Post Number: 345
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 24.88.127.90
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I know people who drink Mic Ultra just about exclusively. In the case of one friend, he prefers a beer he can drink in ridiculous quantities and not pay a whole lot for. Sometimes it's Bud Light. Before MU came out it was Labatt Blue. He claims to hate the taste of a lot of other macro beers.

He'll drink Spaten Helles at the local beer emporium, and he loved my Kolsch. But at the end of the day, he likes what he likes. And as I said, since I'm not above putting back a "light beer" or two if handed to me (that is, they don't trigger my gag reflex), I can understand that they are people who truly do prefer the stuff.
 

Michael
Advanced Member
Username: Hoppop

Post Number: 882
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 24.74.166.143
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2008 - 12:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh, I forgot...one guy did bring a six pack of the "mich ultra with lime beer" last weekend. Thankfully, it was not part of the two cases of beer still in my garage fridge. As I said before, every beer has it's place. In my mind, part of being a host is being gracious to "everyones" tastes...but, I still collect Chia Pets and Pine Air Freshners, so what do I know?
 

Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 146
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 69.29.224.17
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2008 - 01:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Now that I've got my fireproof suit on, I really like LaCrosse Lager Light, served pretty cold of course. A twelver between two of us trolling for walleyes and white bass on a hot day tastes pretty darned good. PBR also fits this bill. Got to make room in the cooler for the fish, you know.

I think the non-stop advertising blitz that the big three use is very effective. Most summer gatherings in Wisconsin showcase Bud or Miller products. Many of these events are family affairs, so I think some of the marketing efforts probably effect the youth in attendance. I'm sure seeing Mom and Dad with one of the big's beer in their hand helps to reinforce this marketing. It is hard for micros and craft brewers to break through this wall, unless a friend who enjoys good beer introduces another to good beer.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9129
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2008 - 01:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There's a lot of power in the impression of advertising on the young. At the end of his life my grandfather owned a tavern on the banks of the Mississippi north of La Crosse, WI. Some of my earliest memories are of visiting and seeing the lighted signs for Hamm's from "the land of sky blue waters." My parents weren't big beer drinkers, but I recall a friend of the family who drank nothing but Budweiser when it was a super premium beer. And when a friend of mine graduated from high school he was given a Zippo lighter with an embossed Anheuser-Busch flying eagle "A" logo by his uncle who worked for a distributor. For many years he was a confirmed Bud man.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5756
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2008 - 07:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If I am allowed an opinion, there is a point at which the level of beer flavor is so low that the word "beer" becomes inappropriate. Mich Ultra has fallen below that point. Vodka and water would be faster and cheaper if inebriation were you goal.

We married off the oldest daughter last night! 2.5 half barrels of our brew were killed. a keg of mild and 1.5 kegs of cream ale. They were very well received, especially the mild. Nobody was noticed to have expired from the lack of light beer.

I caught the tail end of "Beer and Sweat" too! I got to taste the mild that was runner up for BOS!
 

Josh Johnson
Member
Username: Msujdog

Post Number: 150
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 167.73.110.8
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2008 - 10:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not understanding or appreciating light beers seems counterintuitive to everything that being a beer geek stands for.

We are the few who've opened our taste buds and our minds to every style of beer available, because frankly, we love beer. We love beer because we realize that there is a time and place for every kind of beer. Sitting in a beer tent with blutwurst cooking in the background? Need a Helles. Putting up the Christmas tree on a cold night? Time for a barleywine or a spiced beer. I could go on and on.

Light beer is no different. After mowing my 3 acre lawn with a 21" pushmower in August, I'm ready to slam a PBR. I keep a 30 pack in my lagering fridge in the garage for just that reason. It tastes fantastic, and it's a style that I just can't make as well. Again, a time and a place for every beer.

Also, as a beer geek, I enjoy looking at each beer and finding out how it came into being. I get excited reading how Pilsen's unique water makes Urquell, or how wild yeasts create farmhouse ales. I find it interesting to see how German immigrants learned by trial and error that this 6-row barley in America needed an adjunct like rice or corn for it to make outstanding beer. And I like watching how beer styles evolve and grow in popularity. For example, what an exciting time in the history of beer to be alive right now! BMC are struggling to keep their dominant hold while the consumer gets more and more choice by the day.

Frankly, I think it's just silly to look at something and say, "There's no reason why anyone should like that". I could say the same about rap or country music. I just don't get it. But I certainly realize that other people do. It's a little bit of live and let live.



(Message edited by msujdog on August 17, 2008)
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5757
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.223.32
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2008 - 10:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The story of how light beer came into being is not a pretty one.


I suppose you can make an excuse for just about anything. Is there a time and place for Thunderbird Wine, Boone's Farm, Night Train,
Wild Irish Rose? I suppose so, but I doubt that wine geeks go on about them. I feel that a similar place is reserved for light beer. When I have tasted light beer, it has made me angry. What a waste of my valuable alcohol-time? I much prefer ice water until I can find something worth drinking.
 

michael atkins
Advanced Member
Username: Mga

Post Number: 661
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 71.214.28.48
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 12:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Josh Johnson -

That was perhaps the best post that I have seen in a long time on the subject of "appreciating all styles of beer". I have been a critique of the BMC "advertised to" culture of "Lite Beer", for a very long time, and I have never thought about it in those historic terms!

Hopefully - History will move on and Light beer will become something of the past. But I doubt it will happen in my lifetime!

Dan -

Sometime back some friends of mine had a "Brown Bag" wine party. Everyone was to bring a wine wrapped in a brown bag, and at the end of the evening a vote was cast for the best. Of course many brought the best wine imaginable.

The Boone's Hill Strawberry wine won hands down!

Go figure.
 

Chris Storey
Junior Member
Username: Stuts

Post Number: 65
Registered: 07-2004
Posted From: 76.75.118.141
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Being from Ontario, I think the taste for craft beer is much slower than the US. Our "buck-a-beer case is very popular, ( $24.00 for 24 ). Believe me, that is as cheap as it gets. Most of them are light lagers. People just don't know any better and are brand loyal for some reason. They keep buying the same old expensive swill. They are missing out on some good beer out there. IMO, Coors Light is the worst tasting swill out there. The cost is crazy. $34.55 for 24 bottles. Incredible. For that price, we deserve better.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9132
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 69.157.38.136
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As Chris points out, beer is expensive here in Ontario, where alcohol taxes are much higher than in the US. Satisfying those who want a cheaper alternative is one reason brew on premise establishments (for both beer and wine) have done reasonably well, but unfortunately it doesn't seem to have extended to all-grain homebrewing.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 5518
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 03:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tomorrow we marry off our oldest daughter. Our first sale of beer is to her wedding. I have given the bartender orders that if anyone asks for a light beer, they are to be offered a glass of water.

I would have instructed the bartender to pour 50% water, 50% cream ale in a glass.
 

Skotrat
Advanced Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 757
Registered: 07-2007
Posted From: 75.67.98.168
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 03:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

nothing like blatantly making your guests uncomfortable
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5758
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 03:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

LOL! I called the bartenders off at the beginning. Still there is no excuse for bad beer, is there? We go to pick up the empties in a minute.

Maybe Augie Bush would not mind serving Miller Lite at his daughter's wedding if that would make his guests comfortable - NOT!
 

Skotrat
Advanced Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 758
Registered: 07-2007
Posted From: 75.67.98.168
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 03:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hope it was a great day Dan...

Have you seen that AB is pushing a Pale Ale in their newest round of commercials???
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5759
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 04:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I tried real hard to remember something that was not perfect about the day and came up empty handed. I look forward to the other daughter's day although she will have a hard act to follow.

Anybody had the AB pale ale?
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6876
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Bad beer" is relative...one person's bad beer can be another person's perfect beer. Just because "we" don't like it doesn't necessarily mean that our values are attached to it. The same argument can be made for anything you like and someone else doesn't. I used to feel that I needed to "save" people who liked what I considered bad beer. Now I just feel mildly sorry for them and amused by them. Let 'em drink what ever they enjoy...isn't that the whole purpose?
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5761
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 04:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am all for and enjoy diversity and all that, but I believe there a point where the level of flavor in a beverage that calls itself "beer" is no longer beer. This is what came to my mind upon tasting Mich Ultra. At least light beer still tastes of beer albeit at a low level. Ultra went over the edge, at least for me.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9133
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 69.157.38.136
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 04:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can you say "Zima"?
 

Ryan Messenger
Member
Username: Rem

Post Number: 117
Registered: 10-2007
Posted From: 74.34.7.108
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 04:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan, I agree with you about the point at which we need to question if a beverage is really beer.

I believe that the same thing applies to the crap some breweries put in beer to mimic the head, color, or taste [sort of] of a real beer.

(Message edited by rem on August 18, 2008)
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 5762
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.215.70.152
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2008 - 07:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just got the kegs back. The keg that did not blow is, for all practical purposes, empty. I can lift it with two index fingers. The wife tells me that attendance was about 220. The math comes to about 2.25 12 oz beers per person, drinker or non drinker. Not bad!
 

Jason Bentley
Member
Username: Pacoustic

Post Number: 169
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 66.17.95.66
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2008 - 02:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have been trying for a while to get a friend of mine interested in craft beer. The reason he gives for not trying it on his own is the cost. Strangely enough the beer he always asks for when I'm around is a blonde ale I made with a saison yeast. He prefers it to the same recipe made with the us-05. I guess we like what we like and lately that's been a Gimlet for me. You wouldn't believe the number of bartenders that have never heard of it.