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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2008 * Archive through October 08, 2008 * Recipe for Nut Brown < Previous Next >

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Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 147
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 216.170.141.133
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 02:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm still kicking myself. When I was at the Great Taste, I had a nut brown ale that was amazing. Huge malt back bone with a good nutty, caramel flavor with low bittering. I remember the sign for this beer saying it had oatmeal or flaked oats in it. I meant to get back to the tent for another sample, but I forgot as the afternoon progressed. When I looked at the guide the next day, I couldn't identify where I had gotten the sample from.

I would love to brew 10 gallons of an ale similar to the one I tasted, but haven't brewed a brown ale yet and I don't know where to start. I would like some assistance from those of you who have brewed a beer similar to this one. Let's build a recipe!!
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9180
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 03:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A brown ale was my first all-grain beer almost a dozen years ago. It was good enough to take third place in a competition. I don't believe I've brewed one at home since then. My wife is not so fond of brown ales/porters/stouts (she calls them "coffee beers"), but she likes beers with low bittering and is a big fan of Belgian dark strong ales (and New Belgium's 1554). Perhaps it's time for me to return to my roots and try to woo her with a nut brown.

(Message edited by BillPierce on September 04, 2008)
 

Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 148
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 216.170.141.133
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't and that is why I'm kicking myself for not taking notes. After going through the whole guide beer by beer, the only one I can come up with, based on the brewers description of their beer, is Surly's Bender. The description from their website:

This beer is an amalgamation of styles; brown/porter/apa. Five distinct malts, including two from Belgium, give this beer added complexity and depth. We also add oatmeal to this beer to give it a smooth texture not usually associated with this type of beer. We add large amounts of American finishing hops to give Bender a citrus hop aroma because... we like hops. This is a session beer weighing in around 5% alcohol and 25 IBUs. Grab one today, we think you will want another!
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9181
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 03:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do you recall if the beer had moderate bittering but a pronounced citrus hop aroma?
 

Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 149
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 216.170.141.133
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 03:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would say it had mild bittering and a good sized citrus hop aroma. One of the most interesting features was the smooth, silkiness of the mouthfeel. I could imagine drinking this beer all day while smoking a brisket.
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 1808
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

80% base malt
5% Victory (or other amber malt)
5% 40-60L caramel
3% 80-120L caramel
2% pale chocolate malt (or chocolate)
5% flaked oats or barley

hops as desired
yeast as desired
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9182
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 03:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That sounds like a winner, Graham. Have you brewed such a recipe?
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 1809
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 03:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've brewed several, Bill. That's just sort of my generic starting point for an English or American brown ale. Obviously, you can adjust the percentages of specialty malts up or down to suit your tastes or to tweak the color and/or flavor.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9183
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 04:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Graham. That's just about my basic nut brown recipe as well. The result is about 14 SRM, lighter than some brown ales, but you could always boost the chocolate malt if you wanted a darker brew. I would favor an O.G. of about 1.045, keeping the bittering in the low to mid-20s IBU range and using a moderate amount of English-type (rather than American citrus) flavor/aroma hops; those are only my preferences. As for the yeast, I happen to have some saved Wyeast 1469, which is a truly wonderful strain for this style.
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 1810
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 04:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's a good generic base. Add a pound, more or less, black patent for a robust porter. Up the chocolate a few ounces for a brown porter.
 

Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 150
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 216.170.141.133
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 04:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for your direction Bill and Graham. I just remembered that I need to brew something for deer camp and I usually brew a fairly high gravity ale, so this is what I've come up with:

24 lbs. Am. 2-row
1.5 lbs. Victory
1.5 lbs. Crystal 60
1.0 lb. Crystal 120
.70 lb. Chocolate malt
3.0 lbs. Rolled oats

1.0 oz. Centennial 60 min.
.5 oz. Cascade 30 min.
1.0 oz. Cascade 15 min.
1.0 oz. Cascade flameout

SG 1.079
FG 1.012
IBU: 20
SRM: 22

I know it's not to style, but I don't mind.
 

Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 151
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 216.170.141.133
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 04:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh yeah, what about the mash temp? I was thinking of 152-154?
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 1811
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 04:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'd go with 149F, if you're doing a single infusion mash. The high gravity and the significant amounts of largely-unfermentable specialty grains will limit the fermentability of your wort. Unless you are deliberately trying to make a heavy, sweet beer, I'd mash cooler to increase fermentability and thus drinkability.
 

Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 152
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 216.170.141.133
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Excellent. Thanks.
 

Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 153
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 98.125.42.81
Posted on Friday, September 05, 2008 - 01:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill or Graham,

What English sub would you use in place of a c-hop for the flavor/aroma hop?

Thanks
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 1812
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Friday, September 05, 2008 - 04:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Anthony, if you wanted to go the English route, I'm kind of partial to a combination of EKG and Styrians. I am not a fan of Fuggles (which taste like dirt). I don't have too much experience with the more modern UK varieties - they tend to be higher alpha and when I have used them, I've used them mostly for bittering.

In general, I don't brew a lot of English ales. It's a weakness in my repertoire that I need to address.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9191
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Friday, September 05, 2008 - 10:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Like many brewers, the hop shortage has forced me to make a lot of substitutions. At the moment I have a source of UK Challenger for bittering and American Willamette for flavor/aroma that would be appropriate for this beer.
 

Joakim Ruud
Senior Member
Username: Joques

Post Number: 1052
Registered: 10-2005
Posted From: 84.208.79.179
Posted on Friday, September 05, 2008 - 11:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One great thing about living in a part of the world with few homebrewers, the hop shortage really hasn't affected us yet. I've got lots of Chinook, Cascades, Amarillo and Centennial in my hop freezer. It can't last, of course, but so far so good :-)
 

Anthony Catencamp
Member
Username: Reddog

Post Number: 154
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 216.170.141.133
Posted on Friday, September 05, 2008 - 12:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks everybody. I can get my hands on some Yakima Goldings fairly reasonably, so I will try them for late additions with Centennial for bittering.
 

Hallertauer
Advanced Member
Username: Hallertauer

Post Number: 542
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 89.12.17.5
Posted on Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 09:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Graham wrote,

"2% pale chocolate malt (or chocolate)"

So how much chocolate would you add to a 5 gallon batch? When would you add it? In what form would you add it? I imagine you would add it to the boil. Does Graham mean 2% of the by weight like you do the malt bill? Would 2% bakers chocolate be Ok?

TIA
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9195
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 12:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I believe Graham means chocolate malt. There is such a thing as pale chocolate malt, which is a little lighter in color and flavor than regular chocolate malt.

(Message edited by BillPierce on September 07, 2008)
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 1813
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 03:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That is correct, Bill. I'm sure you could add chocolate if you were so inclined, but I'm not going there. My experiences using cocoa powder have been uniformly bad.
 

Mike Mayer
Advanced Member
Username: Mmayer

Post Number: 835
Registered: 12-2002
Posted From: 68.76.85.158
Posted on Saturday, September 13, 2008 - 12:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is my recipe for a Nut Brown

Mikes Nut Brown Ale

A ProMash Recipe Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 10.50 Wort Size (Gal): 10.50
Total Grain (Lbs): 24.75
Anticipated OG: 1.062 Plato: 15.31
Anticipated SRM: 20.6
Anticipated IBU: 24.9
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75 %
Wort Boil Time: 75 Minutes

Pre-Boil Amounts
----------------

Evaporation Rate: 15.00 Percent Per Hour
Pre-Boil Wort Size: 12.92 Gal
Pre-Boil Gravity: 1.051 SG 12.56 Plato

Formulas Used
-------------

Brewhouse Efficiency and Predicted Gravity based on Method #1, Potential Used.
Final Gravity Calculation Based on Points.
Hard Value of Sucrose applied. Value for recipe: 46.2100 ppppg
% Yield Type used in Gravity Prediction: Fine Grind Dry Basis.

Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Rager

Additional Utilization Used For Plug Hops: 2 %
Additional Utilization Used For Pellet Hops: 10 %


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
74.7 18.50 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) America 1.036 2
14.1 3.50 lbs. Victory Malt America 1.034 25
4.0 1.00 lbs. Crystal 40L America 1.034 40
4.0 1.00 lbs. Crystal 60L America 1.034 60
2.0 0.50 lbs. Roasted Barley America 1.028 350
1.0 0.25 lbs. Chocolate Malt America 1.029 350

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.00 oz. Fuggle Pellet 4.50 19.9 60 min.
1.00 oz. Fuggle Pellet 4.50 5.1 30 min.


Yeast
-----

WYeast 1028 London Ale


Mash Schedule
-------------

Mash Type: Single Step

Grain Lbs: 24.75
Water Qts: 37.13 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 9.28 - Before Additional Infusions

Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.50 - Before Additional Infusions

Saccharification Rest Temp : 153 Time: 75
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 20
Sparge Temp : 168 Time: 45


Total Mash Volume Gal: 11.26 - Dough-In Infusion Only

All temperature measurements are degrees Fahrenheit.



Notes
-----

Irish Moss at 15 min