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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2009 * Archive through March 01, 2009 * Burner size < Previous Next >

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Tonymaud
New Member
Username: Tonymaud

Post Number: 17
Registered: 11-2008
Posted From: 151.190.254.108
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 06:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Any of you guys familiar with the Bayou Banjo burners KAB4 and KAB5? I'm in the market for a new burner that will fit a 15.5 gal keggle. The information I'm finding online seems to vary for these. Seems there's a couple different leg styles for the same model that have different size bases. Redesigned? I'm concerned that the base is too small for the keg to sit on safely. Notice the different leg styles for the KAB4 below.
I want a burner that will do 5 gal. for now but allow me to move up to 10 gal. later.
I'm also having a difficult time finding the KAB5. I'm wondering if it was replaced with the KAB4????

http://www.amazon.com/Bayou-Classic-KAB4-Pressure-Cooker/dp/B0009JXYQY

http://www.webstaurantstore.com/bayou-classic-kab4-banjo-cooker-br-outdoor-range -patio-stove-with-hose-guard/554KAB4.html

http://www.cookware.com/Bayou-Classic-KAB4-BAY1014.html
 

PaulK
Advanced Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 752
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.63.203.31
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 08:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's way more burner than you need for a keggle. If you're doing 25-30 gallon batches (or bigger) it's fine. I use mine on a 30 gallon kettle and boil 27-28 gallons with ease. If you do decide to get one, the ones with the hose protector is a good idea. A friend of mine uses one without the guard and the heat reflecting from the kettle caught the gas line on fire. I happened to just be walking by at the time and was able to shut the gas off before any real excitement started.
 

Nephalist
Member
Username: Nephi

Post Number: 120
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 162.116.29.69
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 09:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul,
I just can't visualize 28 gallons boiling in a 30 gallon kettle. What's your secret?
 

Jeff Preston
Intermediate Member
Username: Jeffpreston

Post Number: 365
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 142.161.181.22
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 10:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I bought three Cajun Cookers for about fifty bucks each and welded small pieces of rod (1/2")to each one for stability. Fits a Sanke perfect>
 

davidwaite
Senior Member
Username: Davidw

Post Number: 1935
Registered: 03-2001
Posted From: 173.19.37.252
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 12:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've got that burner but I believe it has a low pressure regulator on it. It also has a needle-type valve (screwed into the end of the burner) which allows for very fine control of the flame. It works well bringing 10-15 gallons to a boil without using a lot of propane. But I can bring the pot to a boil faster with the typical compact 55k burner.

What's nice about this wagon wheel design is the excellent distribution of heat. Nice, even heat spread across the bottom of the kettle. Which makes it perfect for boiling a decoction. Not having a concentrated area of heat right in the middle of the mash helps prevent scorching.
 

Randy Ricchi
Junior Member
Username: Bigr

Post Number: 96
Registered: 08-2006
Posted From: 24.247.41.0
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 02:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

30 psi is an insane amount of heat. 10 psi is plenty powerful enough for what you want.
 

Paul Hayslett
Senior Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 2050
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 71.234.46.245
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 04:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> What's nice about this wagon wheel design is the excellent distribution of heat.

Those burners are also MUCH quieter than the standard jet-engine burners. I covet the one my friend Tom has. If I had it to do over again, I'd buy that kind.
 

PaulK
Advanced Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 753
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.63.203.31
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 05:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>I just can't visualize 28 gallons boiling in a 30 gallon kettle. What's your secret?

Foam control. It really helps when you want to maximize the capacity of your kettle.
 

Tim C.
Member
Username: Timc

Post Number: 158
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 98.243.33.104
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 03:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use a high pressure burner and have been fine with it. The noise is a bit bothersome however I do not stand over the kettle all the time. Once the boil starts (watch close for boil overs) I turn it down to a quiet roar. 10 gallon batches in a 15.5 gal keggle are easy to do.

BTW - I have an easy clean-up method if you have a rusted and gunky burner.
 

Paul Hayslett
Senior Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 2051
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 71.234.46.245
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 12:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim, I don't like the noisy burners because I almost always brew in groups of 3 or more, each brewer doing his own batch. And when the weather is bad, we are all crammed into my one-bay garage. 4 HP burners, even on low, mean that we are almost shouting at each other. Those big banjo burners would make for a much more pleasant experience.
 

Connie
Senior Member
Username: Connie

Post Number: 1331
Registered: 10-2000
Posted From: 76.17.52.96
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 03:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

and Tim,
What is your easy clean-up for rusty burners?
 

mark taylor
Member
Username: Marktaylo

Post Number: 226
Registered: 06-2003
Posted From: 201.148.44.120
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 04:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I thought this link may be useful to some.
www.fermentarium.com/content/view/186/58/
mark
www.backyardbrewer.blogspot.com
 

Connie
Senior Member
Username: Connie

Post Number: 1332
Registered: 10-2000
Posted From: 76.17.52.96
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 05:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good information Mark, thank you.
I started all grain with two of the Bayou Classic burners with metal stands and small ring burners (older model, not the one shown). They would eventually boil the twelve + gallons of wort, but it took time, lots of time. I finally ordered the cast iron jet 160,000 BTU model replacement burners and I'm happy. They burn more propane, but do a great job.
Noise isn't a factor, I don't hear well anyway
http://www.cajunshoppe.com/cast.htm
 

Cory K.
Member
Username: Galaxy51

Post Number: 238
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 65.103.219.153
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a 10" banjo burner that is set up to operate on low pressure and find it capable of meeting or exceeding the btu output of my jet burners. I also appreciate the fact that is is quiet and more efficient than the jets. I did learn that running the jet burners wide open was far less efficient than if I turned them down untill I could get rid of the yellow flames. The banjo burner burns with a flame that is almost invisible.
 

Tonymaud
New Member
Username: Tonymaud

Post Number: 18
Registered: 11-2008
Posted From: 151.190.254.108
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 10:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds like the banjo burner is probably a good choice. Any idea why the leg design is different in the different photos?

Tim, don't leave us hanging....what is your easy clean up method????
 

Jeff Rankert
New Member
Username: Hopfenundmalz

Post Number: 22
Registered: 06-2008
Posted From: 76.122.147.39
Posted on Saturday, January 31, 2009 - 02:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim, I will bite also - please share the clean up method. I have 2 rusty burners that could use some remediation.
 

Jeff Preston
Intermediate Member
Username: Jeffpreston

Post Number: 370
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 142.161.189.157
Posted on Saturday, January 31, 2009 - 10:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Compressed air with a blow gun works great for cleaning out the burners.
 

dhacker
Senior Member
Username: Dhacker

Post Number: 1615
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 74.177.60.45
Posted on Saturday, January 31, 2009 - 01:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I bought burners from these folks . . Pretty good selection of accessories too.

http://www.agrisupply.com/burners/c/5400001/c2c/sc/
 

Tim C.
Member
Username: Timc

Post Number: 160
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.114.204.33
Posted on Sunday, February 01, 2009 - 01:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry. I have been out of town in New Orleans. To clean a rust piece of iron you get a bucket of water large enough to immerse the burner. Mix in 1/4 cup of baking soda. Get a battery charger and connect the rusty burner to the negative (black) clamp. You need a sacificial piece of metal for the positive (red) clamp. I have an old piece of scrap copper pipe. Place the burner in the bucket along with the pipe. Make sure your red clam is above the water line. The black clamp can be immersed. DO NOT let any of the parts touch inside the bucket. Turn on the current. Rust and other gunk comes off in a few hours depending on how rusty. This procedure emits hydrogen gas. Please do this out doors.

A plastic scrub brush will take off the rust. If not, let it cook awhile longer. Rinse and dry the part as it will quickly rust agian. It is nor ready for painting.
 

michael atkins
Advanced Member
Username: Mga

Post Number: 698
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 209.181.159.71
Posted on Sunday, February 01, 2009 - 03:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim C

You are either a "Freaking Genius" or we are all about to be Electrocuted!
 

mikel
Member
Username: Mikel

Post Number: 193
Registered: 02-2001
Posted From: 76.102.205.91
Posted on Monday, February 02, 2009 - 01:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim C's correct. I've seen it done to rusty old bike frames.

Cory,

How did you set up a banjo burner for low pressure propane? Does it put out less heat at low pressure?