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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2009 * Archive through May 19, 2009 * Suggestions for first all grain recipe < Previous Next >

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Tonymaud
New Member
Username: Tonymaud

Post Number: 24
Registered: 11-2008
Posted From: 75.67.248.25
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 02:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Any suggestions for my first all grain recipe?
I'm looking for something good that will have the best chance of going smoothly for my first time.

Thanks guys
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 10208
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.50.33
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 03:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My first all-grain beer 13 years ago was a brown ale based loosely on a recipe in Dave Miller's The Complete Handbook of Homebrewing. It was good enough to be a second-place winner in the mild and brown ale category at a competition. I say go for something on the darker side (more forgiving in terms of off-flavors) and you'll do just fine.
 

ELK
Senior Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 1900
Registered: 01-2003
Posted From: 67.161.248.39
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 03:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Like the St chucks porter, Bill? What kind of beer do you like? What equipment do you have?? Meaning what is the batch size and MT capacity?? That will lock in your max gravity somewhat.
How many Extract beers have you done? Will you have help from an experienced guy??
 

Tonymaud
New Member
Username: Tonymaud

Post Number: 25
Registered: 11-2008
Posted From: 151.190.254.108
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'll be doing a 5 gallon batch. I'll be mashing in a 10 gal. cylindrical cooler with a SS braid and doing a single infusion with a batch sparge. I'll be boiling in a converted sanke keg. I'll be doing it on my own because I don't have an 'expert' to guide me. I have been reading and listening to lots of podcasts however. And although I think I know what to do, doing it the first time still kind of scares me.

Background:I started home brewing in the mid 90's stopped for a while (I can't remember why..kids I think) and began again last September or so. I've probably done 12 to 15 extracts (all ales)and all but 1 came out very good.
I like most all styles but tend toward the hoppier or darker styles.

I think this first one should be something fairly simple just to get the process down, but I would still like to end up with a tasty brew!!

Thanks for any suggestions
 

ELK
Senior Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 1903
Registered: 01-2003
Posted From: 67.161.248.39
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 01:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Very good info so folks can help you better?
First of all I dont think for the most part that one recipe is harder than the other. IF you stay away from step mashes, keep your gravity under 1.05, most recipes are the same work and complexity. Bill was saying that a darker beer will hide and misteps better than say a light lager.
The only difference you are doing is steeping some grain for an hour or so and then draining off the wort. HAs this MT been used before?
 

Paul Erbe
Senior Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 1302
Registered: 05-2001
Posted From: 64.233.251.195
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 01:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tonymaud - Pick a style that you like.

If you like hoppy, APA for example is pretty straight forward. Make it simple.

10 pounds of 2 row
1/2 pound Crystal 80L
1/2 pound carpils

Cacades at 60,20, flameout

US 05 dry yeast

At 75% efficiency you will get a 1.060 starting gravity, so if you get less you will still have a beer wihtin style range. Mash at 152-154.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 10210
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.50.33
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 01:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sure, ELK, I like St. Chuck's porter a lot (I currently have a batch in secondary). It has a somewhat complex grain bill, but assuming that you have all the ingredients there's nothing particularly difficult about the brewing method (single infusion mash). In general I agree that the recipe is not as important as good technique.

Tony, it certainly helps to have seen someone else do it before, but in this age of podcasts and You Tube there are a variety of ways to accomplish this. You seem like you're reasonably well grounded, and with more than a dozen extract batches behind you I doubt there will be too many surprises. I recall that someone else here mentioned a while ago that the grain "wants" to become beer; otherwise humankind wouldn't have discovered how to brew more than 5000 years ago.

Choose an ale recipe that looks good to you, one that has gotten good reviews from other brewers. Pay attention to what you're doing, but don't obsess over it. The odds are overwhelming that soon enough you'll be telling us how good your beer is and how much you want to brew again.
 

Michael
Advanced Member
Username: Hoppop

Post Number: 964
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 24.74.164.235
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 02:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Edit...scaled to 5 gallons...

My advice would be to keep it simple....

Simple grain bill, infusion mash, simple hop additions, etc...

For me, the first few times I did AG, it was much more about getting the process and routine down.....

Mash in
Sparge
Bring to boil
Add hops (bittering...maybe some near flameout for flavor).
Cool
Pitch

Here is one I like (and the wifey) for the summmer time...(to make is simpler, you could use US-56...dry Am ale yeast...). Cheers and good luck.

03-06-2009 Golden Ale

A ProMash Brewing Session Report
--------------------------------

Brewing Date: Friday March 06, 2009
Head Brewer:
Asst Brewer:
Recipe: Golden Ale

BJCP Style and Style Guidelines
-------------------------------

06-B Light Hybrid Beer, Blonde Ale

Min OG: 1.038 Max OG: 1.054
Min IBU: 15 Max IBU: 28
Min Clr: 2 Max Clr: 5 Color in SRM, Lovibond

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 5.50 Wort Size (Gal): 5.50
Total Grain (Lbs): 10.24
Anticipated OG: 1.051 Plato: 12.52
Anticipated SRM: 5.1
Anticipated IBU: 29.1
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75 %
Wort Boil Time: 60 Minutes


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
77.8 7.97 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) America 1.036 2
22.2 2.28 lbs. Munich Malt Germany 1.037 8

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0.76 oz. Goldings - E.K. Pellet 7.00 23.7 60 min.
0.76 oz. Centennial Pellet 8.00 5.4 10 min.


Yeast
-----

WYeast 1272 American Ale II


Mash Schedule
-------------

Mash Type: Single Step
Heat Type: Direct

Grain Lbs: 10.24
Water Qts: 14.34 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 3.58 - Before Additional Infusions

Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.40




(Message edited by hoppop on April 17, 2009)
 

Tonymaud
Junior Member
Username: Tonymaud

Post Number: 26
Registered: 11-2008
Posted From: 151.190.254.108
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 06:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ELK - No, the MT has never been used before. That is one reason I am a bit apprehensive about making this step. It's all new for me. I have a new, MT, new converted keg, new propane burner, etc.

Bill- I agree with you, it would be nice to be able to do it with someone else first. But, like you said, I have watched the available youtube videos etc and that has helped.

I think maybe I've read and listened, and watched too much. The whole process can get so involved. But I realize too, that you can make good beer without getting into all the details. I just want to get the process down and then I can build upon that.

Bill, you also mention finding a recipe that has gotten good reviews. There are lots of recipes to be found online. The problem I find is that many times they are displayed with no comments or ratings on them. Do you know of a site that has recipes with comments/reviews about them?

Thanks for all your help guys, I appreciate it
 

Greg Brewer
Member
Username: Greg_r

Post Number: 216
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 64.124.83.190
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I second Paul's suggestion, keep it simple with an APA or other basic style. You are already experienced with boiling and fermenting, now you need to get comfortable with mashing, you have the right equipment so focus on the basic process. Shoot for a 150F rest, and don't worry if you are 3F higher or lower, it will be fine. Don't rush, give it at least an hour rest to improve extraction and fermentability. Your tapwater is probably fine to use (but avoid softened water) and you can tweak water chemistry after you establish a base line. Keep your sparge water below 180F, and batch sparge if you want though fly sparging is my preference since I am not in a hurry. Add sugar to the kettle if you totally undershoot your OG like I did my first time. Dry yeast will minimize potential problems with liquid strains, but you already know about yeast so use what you like. If you can steep grains you can mash, just plan on more time for process and cleaning up. Good luck and have fun!
 

ELK
Senior Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 1905
Registered: 01-2003
Posted From: 67.161.248.39
Posted on Friday, April 17, 2009 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You will do good... I am confident. I just asked if this was the maiden voyage for the MT as it might leak or the down tube might not be long enough to create a good draw?. Show us a link of what you copied What valving/hose??? How high will the MT be above the collection vessel? I like to have mine high enough that I can start the boil flame as soon as I get an inch in the boil keg. Also remember you want to gently let the wort flow into the boil pot. No HSA allowed even on the first AG batch.. And once again unless the outside temp is above 90 degrees dont open the lid of the MT very many times. In my preferred brew temp of under 40 degrees I swear I lose 1 degree each time I open up the cooler.

One more thing how will you be measureing your MT temp? Calibrate that temp guage and then you will not be second guessing yourself. Also have a backup as if your temp probe goes out it would not be the first time but would be very stressfull. Like a ripped ribbed rubber.

(Message edited by elkski on April 17, 2009)
 

Tonymaud
Junior Member
Username: Tonymaud

Post Number: 27
Registered: 11-2008
Posted From: 75.67.248.25
Posted on Saturday, April 18, 2009 - 02:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ELK - this is the tun I built
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/cheap-easy-10-gallon-rubbermaid-mlt-conversion-23008/

mash tun
paddle

I checked it for leaks after I built it. It worked great and only had about 2 cups or so of dead space.

I have a new NIST tracable digital thermometer http://www.control3.com/4371p.htm to measure my mash and a couple floating thermometers as backup.

Equipment-wise I think I'm pretty much all set. I haven't put a valve on my kettle yet. I figure I just siphon for now. One other thinkg I need to do is figure out a way to measure my mash runoff volume. I'm thinking I'll just put graduated marks on my new homemade mash paddle.



Hell, what can go wrong right???
 

Steve Jones
Advanced Member
Username: Stevej

Post Number: 629
Registered: 08-2001
Posted From: 74.4.39.105
Posted on Saturday, April 18, 2009 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tony ... just do it!

I brewed my first AG in 97 after reading about it ... no one to help me at all ... and it turned out fine. A simple English Pale Ale.

Tomorrow will be batch 170 ... a dark Mild. Then on Big Brew I'll do two batches ... a Leffe Blond clone and an RIS.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 5794
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 75.165.202.124
Posted on Saturday, April 18, 2009 - 03:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I brew with almost the same setup as Tony....so I feel eminently qualified to offer advice.

I would suggest following Paul's recipe. Maybe use 1 oz. additions for the hops - you can pick whatever you like, but Cascades are a good choice.

Heat 14 quarts of water to 170-175F. Add that to the mash tun. Add the crushed malt and stir. The temperature should be around 155F or so. If it is above 160F, add 2 quarts of cold water to get it down. 152F is probably ideal for a first batch.

After 60-90 minutes, add 8 quarts of boiling water. Begin recirculation. After the wort clears somewhat (usually after about 2 quarts), run off the wort into the BK. After it is done, shut off the valve, and add 16 quarts of 175F water. Stir well, and let sit for about 5 minutes. Then repeat (recirculation, followed by runoff). At that point, you should have about 6-7 gallons of wort in the BK, and are ready to boil.
 

francisco hott
New Member
Username: Frano

Post Number: 25
Registered: 09-2008
Posted From: 201.222.148.58
Posted on Saturday, April 18, 2009 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tony an option if you want to know if the sugar conversion is finished is to do a iodine test, which is quite easy just take a small sample (a table spoon) of grains and mix them with one or two drops of iodine pharmacy stuff, if the iodine stains the grains (purple) means that there is some starch left and you should wait a bit longer, the conversion is finished when there is no change of colour.

This is COMPLETELY OPTIONAL but it could give you a really good idea of how are you doing.
The other thing is that I would try to avoid opening the cooler for at least an hour, then if the conversion isn't finished wait a bit longer
 

Jeff Swearengin
Senior Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 1251
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 216.97.167.75
Posted on Saturday, April 18, 2009 - 04:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I brewed my first all-grain in 95' which was an Irish Red Ale. Although, the recipe has had a few "tweaks" over the years, I still brew a batch every year. It was popular enough with the natives that the LHBS now carries the kit. Whatever you decide to brew, good luck with your first AG!

Kilkenny's Penny Red

PROST! Jeff

"It takes a beer to make thirst worthwhile." ~ Old German Proverb
 

ELK
Senior Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 1906
Registered: 01-2003
Posted From: 67.161.248.39
Posted on Sunday, April 19, 2009 - 03:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, We are all waiting to hear how batch # 1 turns out so have the digi handy and please post up pics and your newbie experience.. I do expect something to cause your a bit of worry but remember be happy dont worry!
 

Tonymaud
Junior Member
Username: Tonymaud

Post Number: 28
Registered: 11-2008
Posted From: 75.67.248.25
Posted on Monday, April 20, 2009 - 03:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, I did it! And although it was time consuming, everything seems to have come out alright. I ended up converting an extract recipe I had done before into an all grain. Here it is

American (dark) Brown
10lbs 12oz Pale 2-row
13 oz chocolate malt
10oz crystal 20L
1oz Cluster (60 min)
1.25oz Saaz (30 min)
1.7oz Saaz (5 min)
2oz cacao unsweetened chocolate (0 min)
Wyeast 1056 (1400ml starter)

I was shooting for a mash of 154 and hit 153-154
I calculated a brewhouse efficiency of about 72%.
Not to shabby I guess.

I also created a yeast starter for the first time with a new 2L erlenmeyer flask I picked up.

The only problem I ran into was that I was going to skip the primary fermentation and just do a single stage in the carboy. All was going well until I added the yeast starter and realized there wasn't enough head room (no blowoff tube) so I ended up racking it to my plastic bucket.

I'm just happy I was able to make sugar at all this time.

Hopefully next time it will go a little faster. It chewed up pretty much the whole day. But that included calibrating a measuring stick for the brew kettle and little (time consuming) things like that.

I really appreciate all the help everyone has given me on this forum. It has really help in giving me th confidence to jump into this.

Thanks guys
 

Connie
Senior Member
Username: Connie

Post Number: 1379
Registered: 10-2000
Posted From: 76.17.52.96
Posted on Monday, April 20, 2009 - 04:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Franciaco, I don't think you would want to include the pieces of grain & husk when doing a conversion test, clear wort is what you want to test and BTW idophor works just as well as iodine.
 

Brewzz
Advanced Member
Username: Brewzz

Post Number: 642
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.112.116.217
Posted on Monday, April 20, 2009 - 11:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Connie is right,no grains.I could give a false positive...
Cheers,Brewzz
 

Steve Jones
Advanced Member
Username: Stevej

Post Number: 632
Registered: 08-2001
Posted From: 199.190.8.12
Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 11:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hmmm ... wouldn't that be a false negative?
 

Connie
Senior Member
Username: Connie

Post Number: 1380
Registered: 10-2000
Posted From: 76.17.52.96
Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 01:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

not really. with grains/husks in the test you will get a positive reading every time whereas with clear wort, if no starch is present, you will get the negative test.
 

Steve Jones
Advanced Member
Username: Stevej

Post Number: 633
Registered: 08-2001
Posted From: 199.190.8.12
Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 02:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I guess I was interpreting a positive result as meaning conversion is done, and negative (purple) means it isn't. But I am often backwards from everyone else anyway.