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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2009 * Archive through July 09, 2009 * Best method/process for storing yeast? < Previous Next >

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Vince Turley
Intermediate Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 333
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 66.245.93.31
Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2009 - 01:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Typically I plan my brew sessions so that I either directly re-pitch on the slurry from a lower gravity beer to a higher gravity beer. Occasionally I will harvest the yeast, but do not do this nearly enough. While I understand that yeast harvesting can help reduce cost, my interest in getting a sound process established is really more about having the right type and quantity of yeast available upon demand.

So, what are those "best practices" in use by the collective? My typical approach has been to sanitize a couple of 12 oz. beer bottles by running them through the dishwasher with a heat cycle at the end the night before, and then spray the inside with Starsan, drain, and using a sanitized funnel, fill half-way with yeast slurry. I top this off with a freshly opened can of Coors Light (can submerged in Starsan prior to opening. I then cap the bottle, and store in my kegerator.

Is this approach sound? I recently stored some yeast in pre-boiled mason jars and lids, and covered with pre-boiled water. Is one method better than another? Are there other methods that are more straight forward?

Thanks all,
-Vince
 

Little Dipper
Intermediate Member
Username: Littledipper

Post Number: 488
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 68.248.192.228
Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2009 - 01:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think your method sounds fine, however, I wouldn't cap the bottles you're putting them in. Sure, there's little chance of activity, especially in the refrigerator, but I think you may be tampering with bottle bombs there. I'd just put some sanitized aluminum foil over the top with a rubber band.

I personally store mine in mason jars cuz the wide mouth makes them easier to fill.
 

mark taylor
Intermediate Member
Username: Marktaylo

Post Number: 285
Registered: 06-2003
Posted From: 76.254.67.11
Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2009 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think a lot depends on how long you plan to store it. I salvaged some hefe yeast in a juice jar and covered it with foil. It was in the refrigerator for 3 weeks at which point I simply set it out at room temp. poured off the excess liquid and pitched. The new wort was fermenting after a few hours, no problem.
mark
www.backyardbrewer.blogspot.com
www.thebackyardbrewer.com
 

Vince Turley
Intermediate Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 334
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 66.245.93.31
Posted on Wednesday, July 01, 2009 - 12:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the input guys, sounds like I am on the right track. I think I'll stay with the mason jars as they don't require a funnel, and they are more stable; I'll continue to top-off with megaswill, as it is pasturized and convenient.

BrewON!
-Vince
 

Mike Vachow
Member
Username: Mike

Post Number: 158
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 71.157.162.47
Posted on Wednesday, July 01, 2009 - 02:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I pour off slurry into one of the gallon glass jugs I use for stepping up new yeast and stick an airlock on it.

Although I'm sure your sanitation efforts head off some variables, I think the dangers of various infections come from within as the slurry contains plenty of protein drop out and other gack.

Like Mark, I've been successful pitching slurry up to 3 weeks old, but I can also say that in 15 years of brewing, I've pushed it a few times on old slurry and gotten spanked every time with unfortunate off-flavors. Flat learning curve. With the ready availability of high quality yeast these days, it's just not worth it.

Mike
STL