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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2010 * Archive through March 09, 2010 * Burned natural gas = hot cedar wood? < Previous Next >

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Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2317
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 72.15.105.173
Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 03:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gentlemen, I'm taking my new right for a test drive tonight after the plumber finally ran my NG line. I have a fireplace with NG logs upstairs with a large unfinished cedar mantle, and when we light it, we get that cedar smell, but a smell that you would expect with toasted cedar that has not yet charred or ignited. I just figured it was an aromatic of the wood.

Now, I'm down in my basement with relatively higher-output NG burners on my rig, and I smell the same thing. I have a door wide open just a couple of feet away from the burners, so ventilation is not an issue.

I've had NG heat and hot water for the past 14 years in my prior house and for the past six months in this house. This smell does not show up in the heating vents or from the hot water heaters. So, WTF? I know what uncombusted NG smells like, and this ain't it.

(Incidentally, the new rig is somewhat disappointing in terms of horsepower so far, but it's competing with the furnaces for flow this evening. It will definitely get the job done, it's just a matter of how far ahead of time I'm going to have to light the burners.)
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 11149
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.103.148
Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 03:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Graham, what is the diameter of the branch gas line to the burner area?
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2319
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 72.15.105.173
Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 03:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

3/4", Bill, branched off a 1" iron pipe, and that pipe is only about 15' from the source. The 3/4" run is only about 15', counting both horizontal and vertical.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 11150
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.103.148
Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 04:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK, then, it's not a restriction issue. I'm assuming your gas plumber built a manifold from the 3/4 in. pipe to the individual burners. If you're concerned about the output when running three burners at once, I wouldn't sweat it. I don't believe I've ever used more than two at the same time.

The woody odor is unusual, however. I'd expect a small amount of paint odor when firing up a new burner, but it should dissipate within a couple of minutes as it is oxidized from the burner itself.
 

Belly Buster Bob
Senior Member
Username: Canman

Post Number: 3106
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 131.137.245.198
Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 12:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

could your replacement air be being drawn from upstairs where your cedar mantle is???
 

Steve Jones
Advanced Member
Username: Stevej

Post Number: 678
Registered: 08-2001
Posted From: 199.190.8.12
Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just a wild guess, but I would think the makeup air would come from the open door a few feet away.

... a door wide open just a couple of feet away from the burners ...



That is indeed a mystery. The den directly above my garage brewery has one wall that is entirely built of Eastern red cedar ... two 4' builtin bookcases, with a 3.5' solid cedar wall between (and above). It also has cedar crown mold, baseboard, and window and door trim. It is finished, however, but is still rather aromatic when you walk into it. I've never noticed it when brewing. While I don't use NG for my brewrig, I have used NG for heating, water heating, and cooking for 25+ years and have never had a cedar smell.
 

dhacker
Senior Member
Username: Dhacker

Post Number: 1970
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 74.177.60.105
Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 01:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since this is a mystery, and answers seem few, I'll throw out a left field question.

Are you taking any meds or other supplements that could be affecting your olfactory senses?
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2321
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 72.15.105.173
Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - 01:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ha! While some would ask that question regarding my thinking, no, I'm not taking anything that would interfere with my olfactory system.

I think maybe it's what my Dad used to call simply "burning off the 'new'".
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1391
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 68.57.245.38
Posted on Thursday, January 21, 2010 - 01:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It could be intensifying any kind of wood aroma in your home. I know that when I run my ventless garage heater (NG) if I'm painting or staining wood, etc, the solvent aroma becomes very strong.

(Message edited by davew on January 21, 2010)