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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2010 * Archive through November 12, 2010 * California Ale 2112 < Previous Next >

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Felix Cayer
New Member
Username: Fil_aka_felix

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2010
Posted From: 192.75.94.20
Posted on Thursday, October 28, 2010 - 04:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello All,
I know this forum for years but it's my first post.

I have recently brewed a Baltic Porter. I have used the Wyeast 2112, California lager. It's now in secondary. I plan to bottle it after a few week of lagering around 12C(53F).

I have read that adding yeast could be useful. Is ther a special way to manage bottling? Should I add more yeast, the same?

Your comments will be greatly appreciated.
Felix
Quebec
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 12093
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 216.145.100.60
Posted on Thursday, October 28, 2010 - 06:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Welcome (ou bienvenue), Felix. I don't normally add yeast at bottling except for high gravity (O. G. above about 1.070) beers. Your Baltic porter may be in that category. If so, you can pitch a neutral ale strain into the bottling bucket. It really doesn't need to be the same as the original strain, as it ferments mostly the readily digestible priming sugar. This is a good use for dry yeast such as Safale US-05 or Danstar Nottingham.
 

Felix Cayer
New Member
Username: Fil_aka_felix

Post Number: 2
Registered: 10-2010
Posted From: 72.0.215.151
Posted on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 - 01:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank You Bill, Merci.
About lagering what would be the best way to do it?

I'll be bottling this beer, does it change something with the lagering time?
 

Marc Rehfuss
Member
Username: Marc_rehfuss

Post Number: 244
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 99.165.88.59
Posted on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 - 02:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would add that it would be best to lager at a lower temperature (40 degrees F or below) since it will help drop yeast and proteins out of suspension. What temperature did you ferment in primary at?
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 12141
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.101.115
Posted on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 - 03:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As Marc suggests, lagering for at least several weeks at below 40 degrees F (5 C) is typical for Baltic porters. It drops yeast and proteins and promotes a more smooth flavour.
 

Felix Cayer
New Member
Username: Fil_aka_felix

Post Number: 3
Registered: 10-2010
Posted From: 192.75.94.20
Posted on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 - 05:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There will still be enough yeast in suspension to have a good carbonation?

The primary and secondary fermentation temperature were around 59F, (16C) The lagering temperature is around 42 since last sunday.

Another question, I have this Bass clone that has fermented reslly quickly. Would it somehow improve the beer to let it rest at low temperature?
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 12143
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.101.115
Posted on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 - 06:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Felix, whether or not to pitch additional yeast at bottling depends more on the original gravity than on the fermentation temperature. As I said, I typically add a neutral ale yeast for my beers with an O.G. above 1.070 but not for those of lower gravity.

As for your Bass clone, whether you might cold condition it depends on what you are seeking in terms of flavor. Are you unhappy with how it tastes at present?
 

Felix Cayer
New Member
Username: Fil_aka_felix

Post Number: 4
Registered: 10-2010
Posted From: 192.75.94.20
Posted on Wednesday, November 10, 2010 - 12:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The reason I am unhappy with the previous Bass clone I have brewed is mainly because I was impatient to use my new brewing setup.

I havent brew for 8 years. I found the BYO 250 clone special, decided to brew the Bass clone but only after the beer was bottled, I found out that I didn't adjust the grain bill for my final volume.

The taste was 'fade' but not bad. However the beer was very flat in most of the bottles but a few remained carbonated. I did not understood what had happened.