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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2011 * Archive through January 05, 2011 * Coffee in beer < Previous Next >

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The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 2390
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 193.82.169.3
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 12:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I fancy using some coffee in beer but have had no experience in it before. I know many of you have used coffee as an ingredient, so I'd like to tap your collective experience.

How much coffee should one use in a recipe (for 5 gallons)?

Is it ok to use decaf if you don;t want the 'kick'?

Most of the recipes I've seen are for stouts and porters, but has anyone used coffee in a lighter beer like a pale ale or bitter as the sole colourant/flavour other than a bit of crystal? Can anyone foresee any problem with this idea?
 

The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 2391
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 193.82.169.3
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Also, when is the best time to add it? In the mash tun? in the kettle? and if so, when? Or to brew some coffee and add it to the fermenter ot the kettle at flameout?
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7469
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 06:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've done it 2 ways...dry beaning in the secondary with 4-6 oz. of coarsely cracked beans, and adding strong espresso to the finished beer to taste. By doing that, you can more precisely control the flavor of the addition.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1185
Registered: 07-2007
Posted From: 173.9.91.69
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 09:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I added a pound of ground Sicilian Espresso Dark Roast into the mash of a 5 gallon beer...

It was a Porter. I would not recommend that much

I also have added 24 ounces of brewed Columbian roast at kegging with great success. It was also a porter.
 

Jeff Stein
Junior Member
Username: Steinie

Post Number: 42
Registered: 07-2010
Posted From: 71.230.45.202
Posted on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I added about 7 ounces of fresh ground coffee at knock out of a 10g batch of a stout. It is not over powering, but has a good aroma.

I found out the hard way, using my plate chiller not the best practice without putting it in a strainig bag. Bill Pierce suggested a paint straining bag for my next venture for you to keep in mind.
 

Bob G.
Advanced Member
Username: Brewerbob

Post Number: 639
Registered: 06-2002
Posted From: 192.77.86.2
Posted on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 - 12:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I add 2 double shots of Espresso at kegging and it turns out awesome in my Espresso Stout.
 

Tex Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Texbrewer

Post Number: 609
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.203.59.252
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2010 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

JB,
Some breweries say they do cold brewing of the coffee. That is to reduce the bitterness and acid bite. Put coarsely ground beans in a steeping bag and steep in 4X as much water covered in the frig overnight. I'd say 0.25-0.5 lb coffee and 2-4 cu water. The resulting liquid gets added at bottling/kegging time. To experiment, you could put 2/3 of the coffee in and bottle half the beer, then add the other 1/3 and bottle the rest, which would make that portion twice as strong coffee-wise. I have never done this.

I have added one whole bean to each 12-oz bottle at bottling time (porter). Totally easy. The result was a subtle, but noticeable coffee flavor, which is what I like. Did not seem to matter how old the bottles became, as apparently all was extracted that could be extracted in a fairly short period of time.

There are obviously various ways to do this, but adding to the boil or primary are both certain to drive off some of the aroma, so secondary dry beaning or at bottling are the best bets.

Decaf should not make any difference. Just use good quality beans. Never done this with a lighter beer, but I doubt you would get much color from it, unless you use WAY too much coffee.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 12161
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.101.115
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2010 - 07:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Dry beaning" (4-5 oz. per 5 gallons, coarsely ground in a nylon bag) in secondary has my recommendation. The effect is less harsh and acidic than if boiled or even extracted in hot water. Adding coffee brewed in cold water overnight would probably give the same effect.
 

Brad On Bass
New Member
Username: August_west

Post Number: 2
Registered: 11-2010
Posted From: 72.88.72.140
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2010 - 08:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As I'm sure many of you approach coffee like you do beer, I have to give a big +1 for the cold-brewed coffee approach. This is how I brew all my coffee and I'm sure if you try it you'll really enjoy it. Cold brewing results in 2/3 less acid extraction, far less irritating oils (greatly decreasing stomach upset and/or ulcer worries), as well as a much smoother taste and the ability to make a cup at a time with the resultant extract.

With that said I believe any method of cold extraction would lead to a smooth, subtle final product, especially since you could add it a few ounces at a time to achieve your desired blend.
 

The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 2395
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 77.100.116.116
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2010 - 08:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Brad, how do you make coffee that way? I'm intrigued?
 

Brad On Bass
New Member
Username: August_west

Post Number: 3
Registered: 11-2010
Posted From: 72.88.72.140
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2010 - 08:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

JB, after a doctor at the animal clinic I used to work in brought in a sample, I was hooked, so I got this for Christmas several years ago: http://www.amazon.com/Toddy-Coffee-Maker-Extra-Filters/dp/B0040ZR0VS

The concept is simple, and I would imagine you could make a similar system yourself - you coarsely grind the coffee and mix with water at a ratio of nine cups H20/pound coffee, let sit undisturbed for ~12 hours, then drain the coffee extract off of the grounds. You can reconstitute the extract (which will last in the fridge for about three weeks) to taste in hot water, milk, etc. The general ratio is an ounce extract per cup of liquid, but it's so smooth you can make rocket fuel if you really want to. The same method also works for tea.
 

The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 2399
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 193.82.169.3
Posted on Friday, November 12, 2010 - 11:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow, interesting!

A bit like cold steepong dark grains for a beer.
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1488
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 24.7.226.155
Posted on Saturday, November 13, 2010 - 07:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

FWIW, I brewed a porter a few weeks ago. It included a portion of Carafa II in the grain bill along with British Chocolate, Pale Chocolate and brown malts. It has a decidedly coffee-like flavor, almost to the extent that you could call it a coffee porter. BTW, the Chocolate malts and Carafa were added to the mash shortly before vorlauf.