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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * December 2, 2003 * Amber & Brown malt...what to do? < Previous Next >

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matt_dinges (67.31.177.158)
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 03:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I got a pound each of the Amber and Brown malts from Northern Brewer, just cause I can't help but try out stuff.

So what can anybody tell me about these malts? What do they taste like? At what percentages have you used them?

Any thoughts as to what a beer made with only pale malt plus one pound of say Amber malt would be like? My thoughts were on the order of OG 1.070, hopped to 25-30IBUs, with 1/2oz flavor & aroma additions. Likely fermented with a belgian yeast.

What about the same thing subbing the Amber with the Brown malt?

Or the same beer, but using a pound each of the Amber and Brown? Would that give me a nice strong belgian porter? say maybe add a dash of chocolate and specail B...

Just thinking on the keyboard and wondering what these grains are like...I have no clue, I guess I need to go downstairs and taste a few of the grains.

Please feel free to share any recipes in which you have used these grains.

Cheers
matt
 

Beerboy (81.136.163.57)
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Amber gives a nice colour and nutty flavour. A bit like a dark crystal without the caramel sweetness. I use it in bitters.

Brown is like toned down chocolate malt. It gives coffee, chocolate aromas and flavours. It will give you a light porter if you use a pound in a brew.

If you use that recipe and og but use a pound of amber, brown, crystal, rauchmalt and 150g of black and chocolate you have my christmas porter. Very nice! (oh and use English ale yeast not belgian)
 

Vance Barnes (69.15.38.210)
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The brown is much more like chocolate than I expected. Still has some enzymes though. Use both lbs and make a traditional porter with a English yeast.
 

Beertracker (68.12.51.22)
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Matt,
I really like the flavor that brown malt gives to a mild or brown ale. I've also added it to porters & stouts with good results. About 5-8% of the total grain bill is usually sufficient. Beeston's is the best flavored brown malt that I've found. CHEERS! Beertracker
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 05:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Up to a pound of brown malt in a porter is great. I subbed it out for the biscuit malt in Bill Pierce's St. Chucks Porter once, and really liked the results. Once I brewed a porter using 50% brown malt - it was undrinkable for about 6 months till the coffee bite toned down. I also tried a half pound of it in a dunkel once - another big mistake.

I am less enthusiatic about amber malt. I agree partially with Beerboy - it gives you color without the caramel sweetness. So why not use 3 ounces of roasted barley instead? I didn't detect much nuttiness in the one batch of pale ale I brewed with it (9 lbs. maris otter/1 lb. amber) - well, nothing that you wouldn't expect from maris otter. Maybe 2-3 lbs. of amber would give more flavor?
 

Jack Corrozi (192.189.32.10)
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

use both and some Maris Otter for a really nice mild!
 

matt_dinges (64.154.121.4)
Posted on Saturday, November 15, 2003 - 07:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, thanks for the thoughts folks...

I can't say that I'm much into using British yeasts right now. I'm a Belgian freak; British styles are too rigid for me. Plus, I haven't met a yeast that I like better than the Bastogne...but I am thinking about trying Wy1968 a bit...

Originally I brewed wanting to make a SNPA...now I want to make something that nobody else makes...that's what I take from Belgium...there are so MANY ways to manipulate a beer!

Both beerboy and vance have recomended using both malts in close to the proportion I've guessed, so I might just try it...only time will tell....

Anybody else?
 

Dave Johnston (12.221.36.212)
Posted on Sunday, November 16, 2003 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

12 gallon colonial ale w/brown malt.

12# M.O. 2 row
6# brown malt
1# 49L Crystal/Carastan
Hops however you like them. I use Kent Gold in the kettle only. I love the malty flavor of this beer.
I add 1 tablespoon amylase enzyme powder to mash once I'm at strike temp of 151*F and mash overnight, due to the low diastatic power of the brown malt.
Recommend Nottingham yeast. Expected S.G 1.052
F.G. 1.002- 1.004 Yes you read right.

I love the brown malt and use it in goodly quantities with M.O. 2 row. It's great in scotch ales, porters and stouts. I use so much brown in my brewing I buy 25 Kilo bags of it.
 

matt_dinges (65.58.120.56)
Posted on Sunday, November 16, 2003 - 06:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting Dave, my beer would be for 6gal, so I'd need to use 3# of the Brown in it...but you also have a much higher percentage of it in there than I was speculating...maybe I'll lower my OG...I'm pretty set on doing some sort of dark porter-type ale with these malts, and a belgian yeast...Maybe I'll have to pick up some more of them!

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