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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * December 31,2003 * Grain question < Previous Next >

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Ken Durning (198.175.253.81)
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 10:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Where can I find out which grains can be mashed in a single infusion, and which need to be step- mashed. Some of the recipes I have seen call for a single-step infusion, when I thought some of the ingredients needed the various rests. Is this critical or are they trying to achieve more body possibly?

Thanks,
Ken
 

KeepBrewing (24.186.156.4)
Posted on Saturday, December 13, 2003 - 01:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

PALE MALT .Will work with single infusion mashes.
Body? Use pale malt as the base and 154F mash temp. for body
 

Brandon Dachel (216.177.117.110)
Posted on Saturday, December 13, 2003 - 02:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> Where can I find out which grains can be mashed
> in a single infusion, and which need to be step-
> mashed.

This info is usually available from the maltster. However, it takes some understanding to decpiher this.

Rule of thumb is that most modern malts are well-modified and do not require step mashes. There is some ancedotal evidence that some crops have benefited from a protien rest (Maris Otter 2 years ago I think had some haze issues for people).

Specifically undermodified malts can benefit from step mashes but you'll know if you're buying under-modified malt.

Personally I use step mashes every now and again (by accident usually). You have a bit more control over the fermentability vs body situation, but realistically it's not necesary and many breweries employ a single step infusion.

The only situation (aside from undermodified malts) that steps are recommended for (Not required) is for wheat malt (acid rest if yo ulike clove flavor and are using a bavarian yeast strain) and a protien rest (to *reduce* haze and help the sparge) and rye malt (beta-glucan rest to help reduce some of the 'gumminess' of the mash).

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