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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Januray 20, 2004 * When good beer goes bad....... < Previous Next >

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gregory gettman (209.66.128.130)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 12:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok I admit it, this is the first time I have made a beer which tasted good at first then aged and finished gross.

It's so bad I tried to pass one off on my Dad who is a bud drinker but loves all kinds of beer (don't ask). And he said it tasted like "soapy dish water". I agree its a lack luster beer, it's a mild that's very bland, nothing to it really.

What can I do with it, short of tossing it, which is what I'm thinking? I would feel sad though dumping a case and a half of beer? Any thoughts? Or addresses I'll mail it so you can see for yourself :(
 

Mike Mayer (64.12.96.42)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 12:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Get a bunch of Johnsonville Brats, boil them up in the beer, then throw them on the grill and have a party.
 

Michael (69.132.111.174)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 01:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What kind of beer? How do you know it is "bad"? (especially, if judged by a Bud drinker).

Give it time. I have a 9 month old Oud Bruin that has recovered nicely.

If truely bad, cook with it, as Mike sez. Or, call it Belgium.
 

walter (67.243.139.20)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 03:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What kind of beer is it? What do you mean by bad? Does it tast skunked? Was it exposed to lots of light, oxygen before bottling? Did you do anything different or encounter some difficulties while making it?

I'd be patient and see what happens. Worse comes to worse, cook with it or give it away to someone who doesn't mind it.
 

tim roth (216.180.208.57)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 04:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Johnsonville Brats and Green Bay Packers, a sure winner!!!
Sorry Vikings fans. Cheers, Tim
 

chumley (63.227.173.104)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 04:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Snort, snort. Poor Viqueens, Once a loser, always a loser.

Oh and to the topic - crappy homebrew also works good in the water pan of a Brinkmann smoker.
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 08:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Howabout making an investigation and trying to find out what happened? This way you may get insured it doesn't happen again and the beer wont be just wasted. I think if you have learned something it's never a waste.

I for one am very curious about how things go wrong :) How long was it stored? what temp? What was the receipe? pitching rate? oxygenation? primary time? secondary time? aeration during bottling, racking?

It's not going to save the beer, but it's always worth something to understand what is the cause? Then save some bottles for science, toss the rest :)

/Fredrik
 

Paul Erbe (63.150.119.194)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 02:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gregory we need more info.

What does aged mean? 2 weeks in a bottle might get carbonation but most styles improve with a little more time.

Is it bottled or kegged? If it is bottles you might be seeing some bottle shock. Wine makers deal with this all the time. It tastes good going into the bottle, tastes like sh*t in one month, it is good in 6 months, nirvana in 2 years. It looks like it is bottles based on your note store it for 4 weeks and try it then you might be surprised.
 

Brandon Dachel (216.177.117.110)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> soapy dish water

Based solely on that description alone ( I hate to even suggest this) I'd go with autolysis. I believe that when yeast cells break apart they dump fatty acids into the beer which can lend a soapy, fatty taste. This is just a guess.

> Or, call it Belgium.

I've never had a belgaiN beer taste like dishwater. Horse? Yes. But not dishwater.
 

Tim W (56.0.84.111)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 03:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fatty acids can also be caused by a incomplete, nonvigorous boil, causing a soapy taste. I doesn't improve with age, it gets worse.
 

Paul Hayslett (64.252.34.221)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 05:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had a similar loss -- last winter's Wee Heavy. According to my notes, it was "delicious" when racked in March and "wonderful" when bottled in June. But after 5 months in the crawlspace, it was gushing mildly and tasted of nothing except wet cardboard. Totally ruined.

The gush initially made me think infection. But there were no bottle rings, odors, or off-flavors other than the cardboard. And the mouthfeel was fine. So I settled on oxidation or heat damage (the crawlspace did get warm this summer).

I saved a few bottles to cook with and dumped the rest. I know that is sacreligious, but I've got 200+ bottles of *good* homebrew waiting to be drunk -- why waste energy on a goner? Made me sad, though. I'd really been looking forward to drinking that.
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's a mild? Maybe that's the problem...I've given up on milds because no matter whose I try or what I brew, they just taste bland and lifeless to me. Is this a recipe you've made before?
 

Greg Brewer (12.107.171.4)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 08:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chumley, is that a burbot in your photo? I didn't know they could be found outside of the Great Lakes. I've heard them called lawyerfish in WI. Where was your photo shot?

My wife once told me ice fishing is only a desperate excuse to get out of the house to drink by yourself. I think I might have to try it...
 

gregory gettman (209.66.128.130)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 11:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok hears the more info requested. The beer was a mild ale brewed with windsor dry yeast it was suppose to be an easy brew, no starter.

6 lbs of mild ale malt
1 lb of flaked wheat
4 oz of special B
1/2 lb of brown sugar

Mashed at 153 for 70 min

Boiled for 60 with kent goldings pellets to the tune of 20 IBU. The SG was 1.040 (high I know)
Then a late addition one ounce of Fuggles (plug)

Fermented semi open / 67-68F, lid on and then after Krausen lid resting on top for four days. After 2 weeks in primary gravity dipped to 1.016. Transfered to secondary boiled/ chilled and added another 1/2 lb of brown sugar just for fun. Aged in secondary 2 weeks, then into the tap a draft, primed with sugar cubes.

After 2 more weeks checked for carbonation and served. Not bad after 6 weeks its very light and bland despite some flavor. 2-3 weeks later not much better!

After two months I'm ready to dump it. There is no sign at all of contamination, Trust me with a beer this light it would show up like a sore thumb.

The one thing that puzzels me is the lack of brown sugar flavor, I mean nothing? Maybe I'll have to use a darker kind next time.

I think the only thig I will change if I ever make this is add the whole lb of sugar use a darker kind like I said and maybe add 2 oz of a dark grain to add complexity. Plus a higher mash temp like 156F.

I think it's just that milds are not my thing, I'd rather have the porter that's on deck :)
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 11:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The procedure of boiling the beer between primary and secondary is an odd one. I'm wondering if the beer was oxidized in the process. As for the brown sugar, it does not have much flavor, especially the light brown variety. Sugar primarily contributes alcohol without increasing body. Perhaps you were seeking the flavor that molasses would contribute.
 

craig white (64.12.96.42)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 12:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

you boiled it after primary? 1] woulnt that get rid of any alc, 2]i have never heard of this, did you make a typing error?
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 12:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Boy, I agree with Denny 100% on milds. All my milds suck and tasted crappy, with one exception - a 1.060 mild. IMHO, gregory's recipe is a recipe for dullsville.

Greg, that indeed is a burbot, or ling as we call them here in Montana. I believe those of the cheesehead persuasion refer to them as eelpouts. They are indigenous to North American from Montana north to above the Arctic Circle - I have seem them swimming in a lake in the Gates of the Actric wilderness area.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 12:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chumley, I caught one of those years ago while on a half-drunken fishing trip to Reindeer Lake on the northern Manitoba-Saskatchewan border. I'm not much of a fisherman but I'll have to say I never saw so many fish in my life, including species I've never encountered before or since. We would bait crusts of bread on a hook and catch enough fish for dinner in less than 10 minutes.

As for mild ales, I've got a recipe that has proved very popular. A good mild has flavor and drinkability without seeming weak and watery.
 

gregory gettman (209.66.128.130)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 02:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I did not boil after the primary? Oh I see where you miss understood............I boiled a 1/2 lb of brown sugar and added it to the secondary then racked on top, sorry for the confusion.

What kind of a freak boils his beer? Unless your cooking with it!
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 02:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I understand now, gregory. Yeah, I kind of wondered about the post-primary boiling.
 

chumley (63.227.172.207)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 03:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>>As for mild ales, I've got a recipe that has proved very popular. A good mild has flavor and drinkability without seeming weak and watery.

Okay, spit it out, Bill. :) After brewing your St. Chucks Porter, I am ready to try your mild recipe, 'cause I used to brew crappy porters until I brewed yours.

I have a tube of WLP002 English Ale yeast ready for immediate brewing. If that is not what you use in your mild recipe, and can suggest a tweak or two to the grain bill and mashing schedule, then please do so. Otherwise it will have to wait until May when I start brewing ales in earnest again and will order the proper yeast.

TIA,
chumley
 

Guy C (67.169.98.103)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 05:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Try the mild recipe Jeff Renner mentions in this HBD digest:

http://hbd.org/hbd/archive/4318.html

A flavorful mild is a difficult, but beautiful thing to brew.
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Btw, what do you guys use beer for in cooking? I know of porter steak which is great, but anything else? I tried ordinary lager beer in a sauce once and it just didn't fit. In cooking I tend to prefer more wine, but I would love to get some more ideas to try! Tonight for dinner I have planned to make grilled herbs chicken filets with redwine sauce and my gf is making potatoe gratin, it's awesome. To that I've got two new commercial english ales I've never tried before, it will be interesting! One is Spitfire (Shepard Neame), and the other one is Hobogoblin, has anyone tried these beers?

/Fredrik
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 01:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chumley, here is my mild recipe. It's based on one that won a gold medal at the NHC a couple of years ago.

Mad Cow Mild
A ProMash Recipe Report

BJCP Style and Style Guidelines
-------------------------------
10-A Brown Ale, Mild
Min OG: 1.030 Max OG: 1.038
Min IBU: 10 Max IBU: 20
Min Clr: 10 Max Clr: 25 Color in SRM, Lovibond

Recipe Specifics
----------------
Batch Size (Gal): 5.25 Wort Size (Gal): 5.25
Total Grain (Lbs): 6.63
Anticipated OG: 1.0359 Plato: 9.01
Anticipated SRM: 12.7
Anticipated IBU: 16.9
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75 %
Wort Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Formulas Used
-------------
Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Tinseth
Tinseth Concentration Factor: 1.19
Additional Utilization Used For Plug Hops: 2 %
Additional Utilization Used For Pellet Hops: 5 %

Grain/Extract/Sugar
% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
75.5 5.00 lbs. Pale Ale Malt (2 Row) Great Britain 1.0390 3
15.1 1.00 lbs. Crystal 40L America 1.0340 60
7.5 0.50 lbs. Wheat Malt America 1.0380 2
1.9 0.13 lbs. Chocolate Malt America 1.0290 350
Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.

Hops
Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0.50 oz. Goldings - E.K. Pellet 6.00 12.4 60 min.
0.50 oz. Goldings - E.K. Pellet 6.00 4.5 10 min.

Extras
Amount Name Type Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 Tsp Irish Moss Fining 15 Min.(boil)

Yeast
-----
WYeast 1028 London Ale Yeast

Mash Schedule
-------------
Mash Type: Single Step
Grain Lbs: 6.63
Water Qts: 8.28 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 2.07 - Before Additional Infusions
Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.25 - Before Additional Infusions
Saccharification Rest Temp : 156 Time: 60
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 10
Sparge Temp : 170 Time: 45
Total Mash Volume Gal: 2.60 - Dough-In Infusion Only

Fermentation Schedule
-----------------------
Primary Fermentation: 5 days at 68
Secondary Fermentation: 7 days at 68
All temperature measurements are degrees Fahrenheit.
 

Brandon Dachel (216.177.117.110)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 01:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> The one thing that puzzels me is the lack of
> brown sugar flavor, I mean nothing?

This doesn't surprise me at all. Brown sugar really seems to do very little in the way of color or flavor contributions. Try molasses instead.
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 03:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the recipes, Bill and Guy. Looks like one of the more important factors is a high mash temperature (upper 150s). I'll have to try this in late February/early March when it warms up a bit here - right now I have to take advantage of the fact that my basement temperature is 50°F, and brew lagers.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 05:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, one of the keys to a flavorful mild is to keep the saccharification temperature high so as to increase the body of this low gravity beer. Other techniques would be to include Carapils malt (perhaps 5 percent) and to use a thicker mash than normal (1.0-1.1 quarts of water per pound of grain). These were some of the things we did during my time brewing in Utah where beers are limited to 4.0 percent alcohol by volume.
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 06:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No offense, Bill, but I brewed your mild recipe and had the same reaction as I have to every other mild...where's the flavor? I'm sure it's my tastes, not your recipe, but milds just aren't my thing.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 06:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No offense taken, Denny. I think it's clear you're not a fan of low gravity, rather lightly hopped beers. Brew a batch of your Rye IPA and enjoy!
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 06:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>>I think it's clear you're not a fan of low gravity, rather lightly hopped beers

Isn't that an understatement! :)
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 06:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Heh heh, yep, I'm just a product of the PNW! But I _do_ love things like dunkles and helles, so it's not JUST high gravity hoppy beers!
 

Bob McCouch (68.32.206.76)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 06:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was just playing around with some formulations for a mild, and was thinking of doing something really "different," like using 95+% pale and just some chocolate malt or maybe even black patent to make up the difference. Purposely go really simple and pure, and avoid a complex grain bill and the resulting complex taste profile. Hop to ~14 IBU with Fuggle or Goldings and call it a day.

According to the Style Profile on milds in the Nov. 2003 BYO, a low 150's sacc rest is appropriate for this style to keep the body fairly thin.

Perhaps it depends on whether you're trying to brew a traditionally correct mild (which were made with the last runnings of a big mash) or simply a low alc. brown ale.

I'm intersted in any thoughts on what a pale/black patent mild might come out like. More and more I'm thinking I need a really tiny (1-2 gal) pilot system for new brews, especially when I realize my goal of a 1 bbl rig!
 

Jim Layton (67.31.229.195)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 07:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My impression of modern English milds, based on tasting only one commercial example and talking to folks that have visited England, is that they are watery beers, brewed as cheaply as possible so that they can be sold cheaply. I'm sure there are exceptions, but I think that is the general rule. It is a dying beer.

That wasn't always the case. Milds in the 1800's had OGs anywhere from the high 50s to the 70s.
 

gregory gettman (209.66.128.130)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can make them what ever way you want. However one thing I tried to do was create complexity through revese. For example make a light ale that tasted heavy. So next time I'll try a High sac rest, torrifed wheat, 1/2 lb of dark crystal, maybe 2 oz of roast or chocolate, and a under attenuate strain. Thanks guys.........

Oh fredrik be sure and pick up this books on eating with beer.....

The Brewmaster's Table : Discovering the Pleasures of Real Beer with Real Food

It's a good book about matching styles with food, The only thing that gets on your nerves is his constant proof that beer is better to eat with than wine? That's personal taste and I don't think can be proved, though I admire his effort to raise beer awareness.

The next book in the series is about cooking with beer and should either be out or soon. Its big well written and comprehensive.
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Next please. Spitfire and Hobgoblin please line up with bishop finger. I just realized these typical english "ales" aren't my kind of beer one bit. I guess in a way they are balanced, if you just like that touch of fuesels and I don't. It's diluted carbonated whiskey to me.

/Fredrik
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I found a pattern. Some of these fuesel creations have awesome graphic labels. That's the beers you buy once for the cool label, but never again.

/Fredrik
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I second the recommendation for The Brewmaster's Table. Garrett Oliver, the author, is brewmaster at Brooklyn Brewery and has a background (more than 20 years) as both brewer and chef. He writes eloquently and intelligently on pairing beer and food and makes a credible argument that beer is even more versatile than wine and deserves to be used more in our cuisine.

Of course renowned beer writer Michael Jackson knows more than a little about beer and food and makes frequent serving suggestions in his books and his articles. It's worth browsing his website: http://www.beerhunter.com
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have to agree with Fredrik. Lately my local beer supplier has been getting these English ales in with fancy bottles and/or labels. Stuff like Monty Python's Holy Grail, Monkman's Slaughter, Black Sheep Ale, etc. Invariably I am disappointed when I try them. I didn't think them necessarily as being high in fusel flavors, but more like thin-bodied with nasty hop flavor. Maybe its using Challenger hops? I tried using Challenger hops this summer in a bitter, and did not care for them. I think I will stick with EKG and Fuggles.

With these "micro-brewed" English ales, the old standards also have been coming in as well. These I like. Stuff like Pedigree Bitter and Ramrod.
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 09:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Spitfire uses kentish hops according to the bottle (whatever that is). Both these beer was relatively low in bitterness, Spitfire very low IMO. Hobgoblin was more bitter than spitfire though. A little bit roast/coffe with fuesels in both. I agree too with the description of them beeing dilute/thin. It's not ALOT of fuesels, but a little, and I can't stand it. Sometimes a little is just too much. At least in that configuration, perhaps with something else to balance it out it would be better.

I think I finished my opinion on english ales with expensive labels ;) I like leffe blonde, so I think I'm going to try some more different belgians to explore them more.

/Fredrik
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 04:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like Leffe blond, too, Fredrik, although I would call it more of an introduction to Belgians than the best example. Wait till you experience some of the Trappist beers.
 

gregory gettman (67.75.97.181)
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 11:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

once you go belgian..........you never go back.
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 11:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> once you go belgian..........you never go back.

I'll definitely try some more of it. But the selection of beers I can get locally isn't too great:

These are the belgians I probably can get either from stock, or order...

3 Fonteinen Oude Geuze
Abbaye des Rocs Spéciale Noël
Augustijn
Chimay blå
Chimay röd
Duvel
Gordon Xmas
Hoegaarden Grand Cru
Hoegaarden Witbier
Leffe Blonde
Leffe Brune
Leffe Winter
Liefmans Frambozenbier
Maredsous 8%
Montagnarde
Orval
Stella Artois
Timmermans Kriek
Timmermans Kriek Tradition
Westmalle Dubbel

Can someone recommend any of these as the next step from leffe blonde, in evaluating belgians?

/Fredrik
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 11:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I tried chimay blue, which I didn't like. From what I recall a burn & bitterness that was almost overpowering. Though I might try it again. At the time I tried several beers the same night so maybe I should give it another chance.

What temp do you recommend serving belgians in general?

/Fredrik
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 02:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's a good list of Belgians, Fredrik. It's an acquired taste, but the gueuze is a particularly good one. Sample these beers over time and enjoy what you like. In general, the stronger and darker beers benefit from a somewhat warmer serving temperature, say, 9-11 C (48-52 F).
 

chumley (63.227.171.5)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 05:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Try the Duvel, Fredrik, at 32°F. Pour it into a goblet. Be prepared for a huge amount of foam. Enjoy the lacey head that never subsides to the bottom of the glass. Trust me on this one - you'll see a head on that beer that will give you a chubby.
 

Walt Fischer (24.221.196.114)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 08:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Belgians... Belgians.. Belgians...
Yea buddy....
Bring on the Rochefort 10's!
....or a couple Westvleteren's..
..or maybe a Westmalle..
Or...

Walt
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 11:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mmm next time I decide to have a beer night I'm going to pick a few from that list and try them a little warmer.

Thanks!
/Fredrik
 

Marlon Lang (68.218.225.136)
Posted on Monday, January 05, 2004 - 02:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Fredrik,
Try Chimay with - don't laugh - toffe flavored ice cream. Take a spoon of ice cream and follow it with the Chimay. The Chimay will explode in your mouth and the flavors will be unbelievable! I give credit: Fred E. did this at Dixie Cup.

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