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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through August 30, 2004 * Maple Syrup Questions < Previous Next >

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George Schmidt
New Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 24
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, August 24, 2004 - 11:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Which grade of syrup is better for brewing? Fancy, A light, A amber, B?

I'm thinking of a half pale half wheat ale with about a pound of maple syrup. It's in Clonebrews. I want it to taste like maple, obviously.

Can anybody recommend a source?
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 351
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 12:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually, grade B syrup is better because it has more flavor. Try a natural foods grocery or bulk foods store.
 

George Schmidt
New Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 25
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 01:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Bill. That's what I was guessing, but I wanted to check with you folks.
 

Richard Nye
Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 207
Registered: 01-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 01:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A pound is not that much maple syrup. To get any maple flavor out of it at all I would add it in the last 5 minutes of the boil. I'd even consider adding it at flameout.

I don't know about maple with a wheat beer, but it goes good with porters.
 

George Schmidt
Junior Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 26
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 01:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually, I was thinking 1/2 lb at flameout, 1/2 lb into secondary, and prime with another 1/2 cup.

Another question, though. Is there any advantage to secondary, or should I just put the whole pound in at flameout. Or, hell, even the entire pound into secondary and none in flameout. Clonebrew says nothing about when to add the maple.
 

Richard Nye
Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 209
Registered: 01-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 01:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't think there would be much difference between flameout and secondary. I still question the wheat/maple syrup combo though.
 

Jeffery Swearengin
Intermediate Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 385
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 04:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I can't comment on the flavor difference between flameout & secondary, but priming does add an extra dimension. I've tried it before with a Brown Ale & it turned out very well.
CHEERS! Beertracker

"From man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world." ~ Saint Arnold of Metz (580-640) - Patron Saint of Brewers

 

Paul Edwards
Intermediate Member
Username: Pedwards

Post Number: 451
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 11:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Point Brewing Co. In Stevens Point, WI, had a Maple Wheat when I toured the place a number of years ago.

I'm guessing they added maple syrup or maple flavor at packaging time.

I've done a Maple Porter a couple of times. I used Dark Grade B syrup from a roadside sugar shack in vermont. Best result was simply using the maple syrup for priming. The maple flaovr doesn't survive the boil or fermentation very well.

I was able to brew my recipe on a micro scale at Lafayette Brewing Co (Lafayette, IN), with my friend and LBC owner, Greg Emig. We'd added 5 gallons of syrup at knockout (7 bbl brew length). But after fermentation, the flavor wasn't pronounced enough.

We added another couple gallons to the bright tank, then tranferred the beer on top of the syrup, and let it sit a week in his cold room. It was fantastic. I got a 1/2 bbl of it for a party and everybody loved it.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 356
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tommyknocker Brewery of Colorado brews a maple nut brown ale that uses maple syrup added just prior to bottling. The beer is heavily filtered and pasteurized, however, which kills the yeast and prevents fermentation of the maple syrup. This greatly increases the maple flavor. Homebrewers would have to keg the beer and keep it cold, or perhaps use potassium sorbate. At any rate, it couldn't be bottled without force carbonation.

(Message edited by BillPierce on August 25, 2004)