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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through October 28, 2004 * High/Short Mashing < Previous Next >

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Ron Siddall
Junior Member
Username: Zardoz

Post Number: 64
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 02:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Has anyone tried the "High/Short mashing schedule that was talked about in an article at St Pats?

Germans are using this.

This schedule is for modified malts and you dough in at 148F, hold, raise to 156F, hold and then mash out.
 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 510
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 02:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How long at each temperature?
Real Ale Crusader and all round Hophead
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 870
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 03:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The version of this mash I am aware of is to mash in at 140 F (60 C), rest for 30 minutes and then raise to 158 F (70 C) for saccharification. It's a shortened form of Fix's 40-50-60-70 C mash. It tends to favor both beta and alpha enzymes and likely results in a somewhat more fermentable (higher attenuation) wort than a standard mash. Omitting the lower temperature (40 and 50 C) rests would preserve proteins desirable for heading.

What you describe sounds like another variant; I suppose it would be called a 64-69 C mash.

Most modern malts have no problems with a single infusion mash. It seems foolish to make the process more complicated than necessary. However, there are specialized situations where step mashing is beneficial, and you are free to experiment and decide for yourself.

For example, there were complaints a few years ago about haze in ales brewed with some English pale malts. I haven't heard much of this lately, so it may have been specific to a certain barley crop. I never noticed it in my beers.

Later it occurred to me that my lack of this particular problem may have been due to my typical mashing regime, which is to mash in at 135 F and briefly rest while I measure and adjust the mash pH if necessary. Then I direct heat the mash tun to increase to my desired saccharification temperature. It may have been that this brief rest at 135 F was enough to break down the larger proteins that were responsible for the haze other brewers reported. I can't say for sure; it's merely speculation on my part.

At any rate, you can try the mash you propose and see if it is to your liking. Or you can RDWHAHB.

(Message edited by BillPierce on October 20, 2004)
 

Ron Siddall
Junior Member
Username: Zardoz

Post Number: 65
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 03:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have used single infusion but I have yet to be able to make a pilsner that tastes like a real German pilsner. Not the kind in the bottle that you get here, but rather the kind you get in Germany.

I plan on doughing in at 148, holding for 45 minutes. Then decocting to 158, holding for 45 minutes and then decocting to mash out.

Batch sparge from there.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 871
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I understand more now; it sounds like a kind of double decoction. There are those who swear by decoction for malty styles, and of course it's the mash technique of choice for poorly modified malts. Try it and let us know if it improves your German pilsner. Most examples of the style available here in North America are rather ordinary continental lagers.

(Message edited by BillPierce on October 20, 2004)
 

Ron Siddall
Junior Member
Username: Zardoz

Post Number: 66
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 03:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Will do but we will have to wait about 8 weeks for the lagering......