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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through April 04, 2005 * Munich in IPA? < Previous Next >

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John From NH
Member
Username: Borg

Post Number: 116
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 02:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi All,
haven't posted in a looonnng time, but I've been reading so...

anyway, I got a new recipe the other day that came as a recomendation from someone at the LHBS...anyway, the malt profile seems a bit weird to me
5 lb 2 row
4 lb munich
1/2 lb vicotry
1/2 lb cristal 20L
hopped heavily with centennial as an american ipa as well as dry hopping...
I figured that it's only grain so I gave it a try and it tasted good to me pre-fermentation so it can't be TOO bad, but the high percentage of munich is different to me...not to mention that I don't have much experience with the munich anyway...anyone else do one in this style with this much munich...it's also my first time doing an all centennial beer so I don't know if these two go well together or what

just wondering if anyone has any experience with a similar beer

Thanks!
John
 

Ramon A
New Member
Username: Ramon

Post Number: 18
Registered: 05-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 05:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use around 10% in my IPA. Adds just enough to the malt profile. I've never used as much as you have, but it should be ok. I really like the flavor of munich, and need to use it more.

What was the OG? What yeast?

I have never dry-hopped my IPA with anything other than centennial (with heavy flavor and boil additions). I love my recipe, but I may do 1/2 and 1/2 with centennial in one carboy and columbus in the other next time.
 

John From NH
Member
Username: Borg

Post Number: 117
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yeah, I thought it was odd too (38% munich!), but like I said...I thought it might be worth a try since it IS only grain and time :-)
OG was in the lower to mid 50s...forgot off the top of my head...would have to look at my notes...want to say 1.055...actually for all I know that could be outside of the range for this beer...at the very least it is at the top end???
yeast called for was WL1056, but I always use Nottingham dry in place of 1056

Thanks again,
John
 

Dave Witt
Advanced Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 710
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 04:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

1.055 is a little low for an IPA. But it will be a great pale ale. The style guidelines say 1.056-1.075 for IPA.

I brewed a pale ale a couple years ago with about 8# of Durst dark Munich (in 20 gal) and used my HG cascade hops. Came out nice, but less malty than you would think, and could have used more bittering.
 

Patrick C.
Intermediate Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 311
Registered: 01-2001
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The extra flavor from the high amount of Munich should make it taste "bigger" than it really is and help balance all the hops. Like Dave said most IPAs are higher gravity, but as long as you get enough malt flavor I don't care what the OG is.
 

Jeffery Swearengin
Advanced Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 702
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 03:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

20% Munich is usually my limit for an American IPA!
CHEERS! Beertracker

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