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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through May 05, 2005 * American Hefe < Previous Next >

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Paul Erbe
Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 124
Registered: 05-2001
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 07:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am thinking of this recipe this weekend. 1 questions; Should I skip the Acid rest with the WLP320 not being a big phelonic/ester producer?

Any other input is accepted, you probably tell this is pretty much Midwests American Hefe recipe although I thought I would go with Dingemann's CaraMunich rather that the Briess 40L crystal that my HBS carries.

Summer Hefe

A ProMash Recipe Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 5.50 Wort Size (Gal): 5.50
Total Grain (Lbs): 10.25
Anticipated OG: 1.052 Plato: 12.91
Anticipated SRM: 6.0
Anticipated IBU: 18.1
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75 %
Wort Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
39.0 4.00 lbs. pilsen America 1.037 1
51.2 5.25 lbs. Wheat Malt America 1.038 2
4.9 0.50 lbs. Munich Malt Belgium 1.038 8
4.9 0.50 lbs. CaraMunich Malt Belgium 1.033 46

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 oz. Tettnanger Whole 4.50 18.1 60 min.
1.00 oz. Cascade Whole 5.75 0.0 0 min.


Yeast
-----

White Labs WLP320 American Hefeweizen Ale


Mash Schedule
-------------

Mash Type: Multi Step

Grain Lbs: 10.25
Water Qts: 10.25 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 2.56 - Before Additional Infusions

Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.00 - Before Additional Infusions

Acid Rest Temp : 104 Time: 10
Protein Rest Temp : 0 Time: 0
Intermediate Rest Temp : 0 Time: 0
Saccharification Rest Temp : 149 Time: 60
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 10
Sparge Temp : 0 Time: 0


Total Mash Volume Gal: 3.38 - Dough-In Infusion Only

All temperature measurements are degrees Fahrenheit.
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least, you need a beer."
-- Frank Zappa
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 2936
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 08:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would dispense with the acid rest. You won't get any phenolics with this strain. Whether you want to do a protein rest or not is up to you.
 

Paul Erbe
Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 126
Registered: 05-2001
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 08:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I mash in a gott with infusion only so I tend to lean toward single infusion. This is the first beer I have done with this much wheat so I may do a protein rest.

This was the only wiess yeast available at my LHBS today. I had hoped to go with 380 but this just means I will have to brew again to compare.
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least, you need a beer."
-- Frank Zappa
 

tim roth
Member
Username: Hopdude

Post Number: 220
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 08:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nice recipe Paul. I have an American wheat (all DME)ready to bottle. I used 1/2oz. Columbus @60 min. and 1/2oz. at 10min.
Are you sure you want the cascades, right at 0 min.? It might be good but, I don't know.
cheers, tim
 

Paul Erbe
Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 127
Registered: 05-2001
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 08:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Maybe - I have a ton of whole cascades in the freezer. I also have centenials in pellet form.

I did just dry hop a American Amber with Cascades. Maybe I will use somethin else so I have a little variety on tap this summer.
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least, you need a beer."
-- Frank Zappa
 

David Lewinnek
Member
Username: Davelew

Post Number: 101
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 09:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've read that wheat can create a less acidic mash than just barley, which is another reason for the acid rest in a wheat beer. You'll probably be fine, but if you have the capability, it might be interesting to take a pH reading of the mash to see if you're in range.
 

tim roth
Member
Username: Hopdude

Post Number: 221
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 09:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul,
You might try flipping the hops around. I mean, the cascades for bitter and the tettnang for flavor/aroma at 5-10 minutes. Just a thought.
I have bittered several styles of beer, including wheats, with cascade and I don't really notice much/any difference, from a "typical hop for style". I used to be a strict "tettnang for wheats" guy and they do work great. But, I think it's mostly about the aa%, for the most part.
Unless, we're talking Chinooks. Even a small amount might throw some of the piney notes. They are quite strong, although I haven't actually tried them in a wheat. Just my 2 cents. cheers, tim
 

Brandon Dachel
Senior Member
Username: Brandon

Post Number: 1492
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 11:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> I've read that wheat can create a less acidic
> mash than just barley, which is another reason
> for the acid rest in a wheat beer.

??? Where did you read that?
 

David Lewinnek
Member
Username: Davelew

Post Number: 103
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 01:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> ??? Where did you read that?

I'm looking for the exact source. I thought I read it in "German Wheat Beers" by Eric Warner, but I can't find the reference now. I may have mis-read something he wrote about pH in fermented beer, not in mashes.
 

David Lewinnek
Member
Username: Davelew

Post Number: 104
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 01:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here's something from pages 95-96 of "German Wheat Beers" that might be of interest:

"A mash-in temperature of 99 degrees F works best to bring the enzymes into solution and thereby facilitate maximal protein breakdown during the period of protease activity. A higher mash-in temperature of 122 degrees F will result in less protease enzyme activity, and only a true kamikaze would mash in at temperatures higher than 131 F when using 50 percent or more wheat malt in the grist."

With that said, I've made german-style wheat beers with a single infusion mash without too much trouble.
 

Paul Erbe
Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 132
Registered: 05-2001
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 01:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have been reading Mr. Warner's book as well. I am afraid it is probably a little dated in some regards. With the malts available to us today I think using wheat without a protein rest is okay.

That being said I will probably do one and might even do a single decoction to raise the mash to sacc temps
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least, you need a beer."
-- Frank Zappa
 

Brandon Dachel
Senior Member
Username: Brandon

Post Number: 1494
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 04:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> With the malts available to us today I think
> using wheat without a protein rest is okay.

I suspect you are confusing fully modified malt not requiring decoction mashing with a protien rest.

> With that said, I've made german-style wheat
> beers with a single infusion mash without too
> much trouble.

I've run the gamut with wheat beers. Multi-step, decoction, protien rest, acid rest, etc.

I use a single step infusion now. 60% wheat. No rice hulls.
 

Paul Erbe
Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 138
Registered: 05-2001
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 07:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hmmm - I have read in several sources that fully modified malts have less need for a protein rest because there are less long chain proteins to begin with? But I suppose that only applies to barley malts and not wheat malts. I guess I have never considered fully vs. under modified for wheat malt.

I may be wrong, which comes quite naturally to me.
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least, you need a beer."
-- Frank Zappa
 

Brandon Dachel
Senior Member
Username: Brandon

Post Number: 1496
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 09:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> I have read in several sources that fully
> modified malts have less need for a protein rest
> because there are less long chain proteins to
> begin with

Now *that* I had not heard. Interesting.
 

Paul Erbe
Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 142
Registered: 05-2001
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 01:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

From Bodensatz
During the mash, a protein rest is employed to activate proteases which break down proteins. The temperature range for this rest is 105F to 132F (40C to 50C). A rest around 122F is commonly employed when non-fully-modifed malts are used, or when a large amount of adjuncts are used. A rest in the 105F-122F range can have a negative effect on head retention if such malts or adjuncts are not used. A rest at 132F can have a positive effect on foam and head retention, no matter what type of malts or adjuncts are used. A protein rest is typically 10 to 20 minutes long.

In an article by George DePiro that ran in Brewing Techniques Nov/Dec 98 issue:
Poor head retention and thin body: Medium- and large-sized proteins are necessary for good body and foam retention in beer. A protein rest during the mash can reduce the concentration of these proteins to unacceptably low levels. All of the barley malts I have worked with are quite well-modified and require no protein rest (Briess Malting Company says that even its wheat malt does not require a protein rest).
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least, you need a beer."
-- Frank Zappa