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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through August 15, 2005 * Figured out a problem that has erked me.... < Previous Next >

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Kris Featheringham
Member
Username: Kfeather

Post Number: 188
Registered: 06-2003
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 03:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

serached the boards and found some suggestions. anyway, my problem was that my tap was connected to about 6 inches of 1/4 tubing and then a picnic faucet. worked fine at about 2-3 psi, but as i drank the keg, it would get flat. It was suggested that i go with longer tubing and tried that, but then I got a foam rocket at 6 psi. someone suggested to use 3/16 inch tubing and make it long. well 10 ft of tubing at 3/15 ID did the trick. FINALLY. now i dont have to worrk about forcing carbing every time it got a little flat.

Quick question on PSI. will 10 psi be enough to keep it from going flat? it's a northern english brown ale.
 

Drew Pattison
Junior Member
Username: Droopy

Post Number: 63
Registered: 06-2003
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 03:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yup. 10psi will be fine depending on your temp.

I use this calculator to dail in the CO2 volume with the pressure and temperature:
http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/recipator/carbonation.html
 

Joseph Listan
Advanced Member
Username: Poonstab

Post Number: 764
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've found that 10 PSI is perfect for me. I use 9 feet of 3/16" beverage tubing. Even though I favor english ales, I like them well-carbonated, and 10 is just right for my preference.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1785
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 06:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

3/16" tubing is the trick. I've seen a chart with the differences between 1/4" and 3/16" resistance per foot and it takes a lot of feet of 1/4" to get it balanced. Fine if you're a bar and it's a ways from keg to tap but a PITA is you've got a keg in a fridge.

Then there's always the Phill's Phoam Phixer.
 

David S
Member
Username: Dsundberg

Post Number: 197
Registered: 04-2004
Posted on Friday, July 29, 2005 - 03:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So what, exactly, is a Phil's Phoam Phixer, a clamp? There's no picture at the web site.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1793
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, August 01, 2005 - 09:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

From What Dan's described it's a clamp but with about a foot length of surface area so the beer doesn't foam when it hits the restriction.

It allows you to get the resistance you need without having so many feet of serving line in your fridge. I just coil mine up and wiretie it and it's done. Guess with Dan's you can adjust betwen kegs that have differing levels of carbonation where my 8' line is non-adjustable.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 1301
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, August 01, 2005 - 09:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh dear, another pimp. Come on Curly Joe!

Phil's Phoam Phixer is a special clamp that is about 5" long and 1.25" wide. It has two thumb screws at diagonial ends. The hose passes through it longways. The idea is to give adjustable resistance without creating turbulant flow and foam. You can essentially dial in your foam level. It works very well if I may say so myself.

Dan Listermann
Listermann Mfg.,Co. www.listermann.com