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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through March 09, 2006 * Wyeast 3787 < Previous Next >

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Randy McCord
Advanced Member
Username: Mccord

Post Number: 585
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.174.177.193
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 03:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I brewed my first Belgian ale Sunday. It came out of the kettle at a whopping 1.090,(my biggest beer to date). I overshot my gravity by a few points. Here's my questions:

--Is this yeast known to put out a bunch of "sulphur"? I walked into the house today(Tues) and WOW! The whole house smelled of it.

--Is it a slow finisher? It started out like a rocket and is still going pretty strong, but not like it was. I've had some yeasts start strong and then just come to an almost halt and take forever to finish. Is this one of those in your experience?

I used a 1 gal. starter and aerated with plenty of pure 02 at pitching, then aerated again about 4 hours later. Pitched at 64 deg. and it is now at about 73 deg. but reached 74 at one point. After reading "Brew Like A Monk", I'm worried about the fermentation slowing way down if my temp. drops much more.

I'm a Belgian "newbie" so sorry for the long post, lots of questions, and being worried about probably nothing. It's like a flash back to my first all grain batch. I'm just sooooo excited about this beer since its my first of this kind!!!

Sooo, somebody ease my worries please and tell me your experience with this yeast! I hope this baby finishes low like I want, but I'm sure it will be good no matter what. TIA!!!
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 4776
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 04:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You had a high gravity wort; it's normal for there to be a lot of activity in the beginning and for it to take a while to finish off the last of the sugars. You don't mention if this is an all-malt beer or if you used some kettle sugars, as is typical for high gravity Belgian beers.

Many Belgian breweries let the fermentation temperature climb as it finishes. I wouldn't worry too much about your temperature. Keep your beer relatively warm and you should be just fine.

Wyeast 3787 is reputedly the Westmalle strain, also used by Westvleteren and Achel. It's a good high gravity, relatively alcohol-tolerant yeast. I don't recall a lot of sulfur, but it does have some good phenolic Belgian character if fermented warm. It's actually rather malty if fermented cool. I pitched it into a biere de garde that was fermented at 62 F, and it had a very different quality than that typically associated with Trappist beers. I was surprised at how well it worked in this style.

It all goes to show there are many ways to brew Belgian beers.

(Message edited by BillPierce on March 01, 2006)
 

Randy McCord
Advanced Member
Username: Mccord

Post Number: 586
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.174.177.193
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 06:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Bill. Grain bill was 13#'s Belgian Pilsner malt and 3# sugar. Grains were mashed at 146-147 for 60 min.

This brew session was a nightmare for me. When I dumped my mash water into the tun it leaked. So I dumped the water(that wasn't already on the floor) back into my kettle. Fixed the leak. And To make a long story short, I ended up over shooting my run-off and ended up with about 8 gallons to boil down to 5.5 gal. I boiled very vigorously for 90 minutes to take care of that and added the sugar in 15 minutes before the end of the boil. I also spilled about a pint of sticky mash run-off on the kitchen floor. What a mess. It was just one of those days. I won't forget brewing this one for a while!

This ferment is definitely putting out some sulphur through the air lock. When it first started, it smelled of fruit, but now it reminds me of the wine yeast I used in my last mead. Although the blow-off activity is way down now, the contents inside looks like a swarm of bees.
 

Randy McCord
Advanced Member
Username: Mccord

Post Number: 587
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.174.177.193
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 06:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By the way Bill, thanks for recommending "Brew Like a Monk". It is a great book. I read it in 3 days and I rarely read anything but magazines and newspapers and these boards. I've been rereading several pages since I finished it. I'm thinking about fabbing me up a stainless fermenter with the 1 to 1 dimensions that I read about. It will also take up a lot less space. A 12"X12"X12" square fermenter will have a capacity of about 7.5 gal. by my calcs. If it don't make a difference in fermentation, then at least it will be more compact than a 6.5 gal carboy.
 

Paul Edwards
Advanced Member
Username: Pedwards

Post Number: 959
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.229.31.223
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 02:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently did a tripel, splitting a 10 gallon batch between Wyeast 3787 and Wyeast 1214. The 5 gallons with the 3787 cleared much quicker that the 1214 (which took a couple more weeks, plus a cold storage to clear).

Both are very tasty, and true to the tripel style. But the 3787 was a little sweeter, and slightly cleaner and less phenolic than the 1214 (both were fermented at about 64 deg F in both primary and secondary).

In hindsight, I probably should've let the 3787 sit in secondary a little longer to dry it out some more. But the yeast had settled, and the beer was clear, so I went ahead and kegged it.

I don't really remember any sulphur from either yeast. But I wasn't looking for it, either.
 

R. M. Zelayeta
Junior Member
Username: Troglodyte

Post Number: 75
Registered: 10-2004
Posted From: 70.18.233.250
Posted on Thursday, March 02, 2006 - 02:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ugh, 3787….

That strain nearly got me evicted from my apartment last fall. I always run a pilot batch of, illegal in Belgium, Belgian “single” to establish my cake. The single smelled sweet as a rose, made a wonderful beer. When I dumped 1.098 wort onto the cake, sulfur erupted, and continued erupting for four days. Ruined my diplomat landlord’s diplomatic dinner party. I got a “royal” earful.

On to more important stuff, the ale has turned out wonderfully, will bottle it this weekend.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 4785
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Thursday, March 02, 2006 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I still think a bottle of the offending ale now that it has aged, perhaps accompanied with a basket of fruit, would be a suitable peace offering to your landlords. However, I'm probably not the coolest head and my advice should be ignored.
 

R. M. Zelayeta
Junior Member
Username: Troglodyte

Post Number: 77
Registered: 10-2004
Posted From: 70.18.233.250
Posted on Thursday, March 02, 2006 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill,

Your advice is always good advice. But, like I originally said, it’s Chateauneuf du Pape upstairs and bitters and Belgians down here. Bluntly, they give their surplus beer to me; I’ve accumulated cases of it in my closet.

As I know you like wine, thought you might find this interesting. I went to a tasting at Domain Drouhin, OR a couple few ago. She put her best up against their affiliated French domains. While I was rooting for the home team, I think the French won. Still, it was a gutsy move, and Domain Drouhin is exceptional stuff. Would like to see something similar happen in Walla Walla—I’ll bet the home team wins there.

Hope the move is finished and you are brewing again.

rz