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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through April 19, 2006 * Corn Syrup question < Previous Next >

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Chris Chila
New Member
Username: Cchila

Post Number: 24
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 206.104.4.34
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have never used corn syrup before and the bottle I bought says it contains “real vanilla”. Is this a standard product in all corn syrups?

Thanks
Chris
 

Paul Edwards
Senior Member
Username: Pedwards

Post Number: 1007
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 68.78.6.159
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 01:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is this Karo corn syrup? light or dark?

Most light corn syrups for cooking and baking do have vanilla and salt in the them, and the dark syrups also usually have preservatives (sodium benzoate, most likely) in them.
 

Chris Chila
Junior Member
Username: Cchila

Post Number: 26
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 63.118.20.195
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is Karo light syrup. I'm guessing I bought the wrong stuff??
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5047
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.239.69
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 02:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't know if it's "the wrong stuff," but it's not ideal. The added salt is a minor concern, as would be any preservatives (unless the recipe calls for a large percentage of corn syrup). Whether the flavor of the added vanilla is an issue again depends on the amount of corn syrup and the beer style in question.

The corn syrup used by food manufacturers (baking, soft drinks, etc.) has no additives, but I have not seen this available to homebrewers. You might try a natural foods grocery, but the "whole earth" types are not generally very friendly to corn syrup. An option might be fructose, which is favored by some people who have trouble metabolizing sucrose.

(Message edited by BillPierce on April 06, 2006)
 

Chris Chila
Junior Member
Username: Cchila

Post Number: 27
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 63.118.20.195
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 02:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can it be used to prime at bottling?
 

Connie
Advanced Member
Username: Connie

Post Number: 722
Registered: 10-2000
Posted From: 24.98.248.244
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 02:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

or substitute Lyle's Golden Syrup. It's a cane sugar syrup, light colored and rather expensive for a 10.6 fl oz can.
ingredients: cane sugar syrup.
 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 1065
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 86.128.123.129
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 02:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Golden Syrup is just partially inverted cane sugar. It's easily available here in England, but I wouldn't say it is vastly different from using standard sugar.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5048
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.239.69
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Golden Syrup is slightly caramelized. You could certainly make your own for far less than it costs. There are quite a few expat Brits where I live, so it's in every store here.

Incidentally, the parent company, Lyle & Tate, are the discoverers of sucralose (Splenda).
 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 1067
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 86.128.123.129
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lyles Golden syrup is delicious on scotch pancakes.
 

Greg Beron
Advanced Member
Username: Gberon

Post Number: 537
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 71.104.218.198
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 05:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Karo syrup is not something you want to use in your beer. Any kind of preservative-free sugar would be better for bottling.

As an aside, I've only seen one distributor who offers brewer's corn syrup, and that was in larger quantities than a homebrewer would use. That's why it's so rare in homebrew stores.
Greg Beron
Culver City Home Brewing Supply
www.brewsupply.com
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5050
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.239.69
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 05:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I continue to maintain that sugar (corn sugar or white table sugar) is far and away the preferred priming agent. I don't see what advantage corn syrup would have.
 

Tony Legge
Member
Username: Boo_boo

Post Number: 157
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 142.163.66.1
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 11:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One Store here that recently closed had brought in a 5 gallon bucket of brewers corn syrup and was selling it for $8 a pound. Bit pricy for my needs.
 

Miker
Intermediate Member
Username: Miker

Post Number: 454
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 69.15.183.207
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We use 5 gallon buckets of high fructose corn syrup here at work and pay $20 for 55 pounds (+ freight from St. Louis) so yeah, that One Store (that recently closed) was marking it up a wee bit, I'd say.
 

Patrick C.
Advanced Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 536
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 65.82.198.121
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The main problem in using Karo or other grocery store corn syrups for priming is that they have a lot of unfermantatbles. The nutrition label says a serving has 31 g of carbs, of which only 12 are sugars. The sugar profile is 3% fructose, 26% glucose, 13% maltose, 11% trisaccharides, and 47% polysaccharides.

I think you're fine using it in beer- regular (light) Karo doesn't have any preservatives, and the polysacharides should add body/mouthfeel/something. I used some in a porter once, but it was sort of a 'kitchen sink' recipe so I couldn't pick out any specific taste or other contribution from the Karo.
 

Kentucky Dan
Junior Member
Username: Kydan47

Post Number: 96
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 12.220.192.7
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 10:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I used Karo in a Belgian triple once and the taste was quite good. The burn that usually fades at about 7 months was reached in 3 months, but after about 5 months, it developed a celery taste. Never again!
 

RJ Testerman
Junior Member
Username: Rjt

Post Number: 94
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 208.31.88.52
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 11:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill P. How do you make that golden syrup?

RJ
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5103
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.239.69
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 11:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lightly caramelize some white sugar and add a little water, boiling until it has the consistency of syrup.
 

dave star
Member
Username: Dave_star

Post Number: 116
Registered: 12-2004
Posted From: 66.245.135.128
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 09:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Invert sugar can be made by Puting 8 lb of sugar in a sauce pan with 2 pt water and 1/2 oz citric acid. Bring slowly to the boil, stiring frequently and boil for 30 mins. Stir in another 2 pt boiling water and allow to cool.
Dave