Topics Topics Help/Instructions Help Edit Profile Profile Member List Register  
Search Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Visit The Brewery's sponsor!
Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2007 * Archive through June 06, 2007 * Real cask ales < Previous Next >

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  ClosedClosed: New threads not accepted on this page        

Author Message
 

gregory gettman
Advanced Member
Username: Gregman

Post Number: 569
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.235.81.114
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2007 - 10:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've got a Honey brown made for a real ale cask Mmmmmmm can't wait.

How early do you rack off the primary so that there's enough gravity for the secondary carbonation.

Iv'e read 4-6 points before the expected FG ?
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 4334
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 12:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Trying to time racking in order to hit a desired level of carbonation is difficult unless you have a lot of experience with the recipe. How do you know what your expected FG is gong to be?

Generally it is better to let the beer ferment to FG and add a sugar to prime.

--This space is STILL being left intentionally blank.-


 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 7073
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 01:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I agree with Dan about this. I brewed a mild ale last week. It's not intended to be cask conditioned but I will keg it and serve it at a somewhat low level of carbonation. Now I have no experience with this particular recipe (Jeff Renner's Lucky Penny Mild) or yeast strain (Wyeast 1469), so the determination of the F.G. was a matter of conjecture. The grain bill has a high percentage of munich and specialty malts (all somewhat less fermentable), but low gravity ales are known for fermenting well. I wanted to ensure it wasn't thin bodied, so I did a single infusion mash at 156 F. The O.G. was 1.038; my guesstimate for the F.G. was 1.012. Active fermentation finished quickly, as is typical for low gravity beers. When I racked it three days later it was at 1.014. Whether it drops another point or two by the time I keg it this coming weekend is anyone's guess. At any rate, my point is that I'm not sure I would have been able to predict when to rack it to a keg if I'd wanted it cask conditioned without priming. It's a lot easier, more predictable and no less cask ale if you let it get close to finishing and add a small amount of sugar.

(Message edited by BillPierce on May 15, 2007)
 

Tom Meier
Advanced Member
Username: Brewdawg96

Post Number: 579
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.146.142.31
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 01:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Greg,
I let it ferment out then do the rack + prime + dry hop + isinglass finings all in one step and wait 7 days.

It would be very difficult to rig up something to do 'spunding' where you rack a little too early, and bleed off the excess pressure. thats the only way you could really get an accurate level of CO2.

Plus priming is the traditional way, and the re-fermentation has some nice flavor benefits.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 4336
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 02:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recall that when I first brewed in '73, I had a hydrometer that had a red line with a "B" marked on it. The instructions were to bottle the beer when the hydrometer read "B." The thinking was that there was enough unfermented sugar left to carbonate the beer. What a disaster! I did not know any better and had bottles blowing up and gushing all over the place. It is one of the reasons I did not attempt brewing again for 15 years.

You still see these "brewing hydrometers" around.

--This space is STILL being left intentionally blank.-


 

The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 1582
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 81.132.152.30
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 06:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think most Micros I know add isinglass and sugar when racking to barrels, unless they barrel bright. Although that is more for the home market than the pub market.
 

Jim O'Conner
Advanced Member
Username: Roguejim

Post Number: 894
Registered: 06-2003
Posted From: 204.16.45.151
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 09:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill,

Wyeast 1469? Is this new?
Jim
 

brett matthews
Member
Username: Brettj

Post Number: 160
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 220.235.80.91
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 10:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use a Hi-gene handpump with a cask breather to dispense my ales (none have been that great lately due to my recently discovered mash ph problems!!!) I keg the beer when completely fermented out, purge three times and then leave a blanket of co2 at 100 kpa over the beer. There always seems to be a little left in the beer and enough in the blanket to give it a small amount of carbonation.
 

Paul Edwards
Senior Member
Username: Pedwards

Post Number: 1390
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.236.29.144
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 12:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jim,

Wyeast 1469 is a seasonal offering from Wyeast. It's from West Yorkshire, supposedly from Timothy Taylor.

"From a well-known and highly regarded brewery in Keighley, West Yorkshire, England. Full chewy malt flavor and character, but finishes dry, producing famously balanced beers. Moderate nutty and stone-fruit esters. Bright beers easily achieved within days without filtration. For production of cask-conditioned bitters, ESB and mild ale. Alcohol tolerance approximately 9% ABV. Flocculation: High. Apparent Attenuation: 67-71% (64-72 F)"

I've used it in an ESB with great success. I'm doing another ESB with it today.

As for dispensing real ales with my beer engine (an Angram), I do the same as Brett...

(Message edited by pedwards on May 15, 2007)
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 7077
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 12:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jim, Wyeast 1469 is the West Yorkshire Ale strain, allegedly from Timothy Taylor. It was a seasonal offering this spring; perhaps they will make it a regular selection. Some people claim to prefer it to 1968. My beer is only a week old, but it tasted good going into secondary.

(Message edited by BillPierce on May 15, 2007)
 

Spartacus
Member
Username: Spartacus_manly

Post Number: 126
Registered: 11-2006
Posted From: 24.128.118.170
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hi,

That Timothy Taylor Strain is amazing!

I believe it will be my house ale yeast this year. Great Floccer, Great attenuation. Just a wonderful yeast all around.

Skotrats Homebrew: http://www.skotrat.com
BrewRats Homebrew Club: http://www.brewrats.org
BBS: http://www.skotrat.com/skotrat/webboard
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 7080
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 01:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wyeast 1469 was very well-behaved yeast in my experience. The smack pack was a little slow to swell completely (12 hours) and the lag time was not the quickest (8 hours), but it produced a good kraeusen that finished quickly (three days for a 1.038 O.G. mild ale) and dropped very clear. I racked to secondary because I'm a creature of habit, but I really think it's unnecessary. When I shine a light through the carboy there's absolutely no haze. I'm likely to keg it Thursday and be drinking it by the weekend.
 

gregory gettman
Advanced Member
Username: Gregman

Post Number: 570
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.235.77.185
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Time is kind of short on this one an that's the reason I asked. There is a way to vent the keg with a 15 psi valve, which is easy enough. If the pressure gets to high it will just let some off.

Funny you mentioned the 1469 that's the yeast I'm using. First time though an it seems to like warmer temps. Although I've read that some people have fermented it as low as 60F.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 4338
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.27.158.31
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 06:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pressure relief valves have what is known as a "dead band." The valve won't vent until a certain pressure is reached (cracking pressure), but it will continue venting to a pressure less than the set pressure or vice versa. The difference in these pressures is the dead band. All valves have different amounts of dead band. Just setting a relief valve to a certain pressure does not guarentee that pressure, just close to it.

(Message edited by listermann on May 15, 2007)

--This space is STILL being left intentionally blank.-