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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2010 * Archive through March 09, 2010 * Candi Syrup Tips from May Episode Basic Brewing < Previous Next >

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Craig Henry
Advanced Member
Username: Sail

Post Number: 625
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 136.181.195.8
Posted on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 06:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi all,

I was experimenting with making my own belgian candy sugar in recent months and found a another source for some tips of carmelizing sugars.

Candi Syrup Tips from May Episode Basic Brewing with Joshua Smith. These are his steps for others interested.

1 1/2 tsp Diammonium Phosphate (DAP) (yeast nutrient) Increase quantity as you increase temp
1 cup water
2 lbs table sugar
(for cooling 1+ cup water)

- Disolve yeast nutrient into the water
- Add it to a thick bottomed sauce pan.
- Add the sugar (no stiring should be necessary)
- Heat on Medium to ~ 270F which gives you a carmel flavor) More than 290F may burn
- Add 1 cup water to slow cooking and stop the darkening (be careful because it will boil and spatter)
- Heat back up to 240F to reach the soft ball stage to get syrup.
- Cool in a water bath or pour into warmed mason jars.

Has anyone played with this method of carmelization? (Millard reaction)
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 6042
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Its a bit more complicated than what I do, but that essentially covers the process.

I just add the DAP to the sugar in the sauce pan, stir in enough water until it forms a thick syrup, heat it over medium, and take it off the burner when it gets the right color (amber = good, brown = too much heat). Then I go and add to the ale I'm brewing (I do it at the end of the boil).
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 2899
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 167.4.1.41
Posted on Tuesday, February 09, 2010 - 08:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't think heating sugar and water is technically producing any Maillard reactions (requires amino acid) and is simply carmelization, but then I haven't studied chemistry since....

I usually just boil some wort down until it thickens, and then add back to the boil.