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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * April 1, 2003 * Amazing Aging! < Previous Next >

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Chad Dickinson (198.26.120.13)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 04:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just got back into homebrewing a month and a half ago from a 5 year hiatus, and have done 2 batches. A Sam Adams clone, and a Fat Tire clone. Both turned out very well. I am however, AMAZED at what a little bit of aging will do for a beer. My Fat Tire was a bit rough at kegging time. Its been in the keg in my fridge for 2 weeks now, and it gets better by the day. Same for the Sam Adams. That one is AWESOME now, though I have lost some of the aroma from the aroma hops. I think I'll add a few more in the dry hopping procedure next time. I'm doing a Harpoons IPA tomorrow, and I'm gonna do a SNPA on the Harpoon yeast cake!
 

Bill Dutton (192.223.243.5)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 04:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My first batch of beer was a faux pilsner (made with ale yeast). At first, it was a bit rough. I put 2 bottles in the fridge and forgot about them for a few months (last August). I tried one a couple weeks ago and it was tremendous. Made me wish I had set aside a whole case!
 

Josh S (198.208.6.35)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 05:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I brewed an Imperial Stout last March. It was way too bitter after a couple of months, but after almost a year now, it's awesome. I would recommend aging any highly bitter beer, it's definitely worth it.
 

Walt Fischer (192.25.240.225)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 07:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A couple months old makes a big difference for sure!

That was one of the reasons i moved to 10 gallon batches. So when i drank my last one, i still had a second 5 gallon keg to tap that had been sitting there a couple months...

Yummmm :)

Walt
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Doug Pescatore (141.232.1.10)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Aging can do wonders for just about any homebrew. My first batch was a Vienna Lager (ale yeast) made with a MrBeer kit and bottles in Soda bottles. I gave a few 16 oz. bottles to my mom. The beer at best was a Malty mess when I killed my last one, but a few months later my mom said that she finally got around to trying my beer again and found it to be very good compared to the first time she tried it.

-Doug
 

Bill Pierce (208.57.122.28)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 07:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I happen to favor aging for many beers, but I also feel it is worth mentioning that real ale partisans prefer serving beer young while it still has that fresh, fruity quality.
 

D. Ken Forssen (140.142.119.140)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 08:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I made a very hoppy IPA and, as Bill is touching on, LOVED it when it was still a newborn :) It was great several months later, but had smoothed out and lost the herbal and fruity flavors that were so crisp when it was younger. But IPA isn't really a beer to be aged anyway...
 

Bill Pierce (208.57.122.28)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 08:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Some would argue that IPAs do benefit from aging. Historically they were brewed to survive the long sea voyage to India.
 

big earl (209.222.26.27)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 08:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>>>IPA isn't really a beer to be aged anyway...
QUE ??

while a nice fresh hop flavor/aroma is great in an IPA.

the original concept of IPA is, that it was made stronger and hoppier, to keep better over long sea voyages
 

big earl (209.222.26.27)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 08:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

B.P. is always one step ahead ;~}
 

D. Ken Forssen (140.142.119.140)
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 08:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is true, historically, but most people *now* seem to prefer it younger it seems. Too bad we couldn't interview them when they got on and off the ship to see their preference :)
 

Rupp (63.189.72.86)
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Being a real ale partisan, I have to disagree with the whole aging makes better theory. It all depends on how you want to brew. A beer can be made very well-balanced and flavorful three days out of primary if you brewed it to be that way. If you like adding alot of bittering hops and strong dark malts, and can't stomach the beer right away, then extra time may be necessary. Let's not pigeon hole everything here.

Unless you've actually taken your beer on a sea voyage to India through temp and moisture extremes, you really don't know what histoic IPA tasted like anyway. Drink it fresh!
 

HEU Brewer (208.40.47.182)
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2003 - 06:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What the hell is a real ale partisan? Do we talk about cold conditioning partisons?

Rupp should have also mentioned the beers were transported in ships were tossed and turned quite a bit. Perhaps to brew a real historical IPA you can subject it to temp extremes while using a Red Devil automatic paint shaker to model the rough seas.

Today's IPA's bear little resemblence to historical IPA's and anyone who thinks aging their IPA will gain a historical note is.... well a moron.

I guess to brew a historical porter we need to add some tobacco, poisons and narcotics

HEU Brewer
 

Doug Pescatore (141.232.1.10)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 12:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Extract twang will not go away with aging. On Sunday I found one bottle of my very first batch which was over a year old. My first batch was a MrBeer kit and it had a serious extract twang. I drank it last night and it was just as bad as it was when it was 2 weeks old. I remember thinking that the beer wasn't bad when I first made it, but now that I am producing some really good stuff it just doesn't cut it.

-Doug
 

Jim Keaveney (205.188.209.80)
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 06:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On Saturday, I cracked open the last bottle of an IPA/BArleywine that was 20 months old. I remember drinking it from a keg when it was young and the hop aroma was wonderful. The aging process dramatically changed the beer. It was crystal clear amber color with great malt character that had been somewhat overwhelmed by the hops when it was young. Great bitterness and flavor from the cascade hops but not a great deal of aroma. Very smooth and well balanced (maybe a little too balanced for an IPA) Thoroughly enjoyed both versions, but would give a slight edge to the aged one.

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