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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * April 15, 2003 * Treated Lumber for Freezer Collar? < Previous Next >

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Randy McCord (12.104.215.193)
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2003 - 06:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've got a small chest freezer that I'm wanting to modify to use as a fermentation chamber for ales and wondered what kind of lumber to use as a collar. I have to raise the lid up 5-8 inches to have plenty of headroom for my airlocks(the hump for the compressor goes clear across bottom). I'm thinking about using treated lumber coated with some Thompson's weather seal or something because it is in my hot garage and I'm sure there will be some condensation present.
 

Jake Isaacs (198.93.125.202)
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2003 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Treated lumber will keep termites and some fungi away, but critters (mold, etc.) will still grow on the surface. I'd just paint or stain some regular lumber and apply a coat of polyurethane. This will look nicer, as well.

There's also the issue of arsenic and chromium leaching from the treated lumber, but that's pretty minor. I used to do R&D on the stuff as a co-op during my undergrad years, but never did any tests involving alcoholic beverages (directly on the wood, at least :)). Still, I'd be a little wary of using it in a "food service"-type situation.
 

Craig Johnson (198.81.26.47)
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2003 - 04:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Randy,

Contrary to what some people may have told you, treated wood is suceptable to decay. The treatment penetrates the wood about 3/8". If you cut the boards the newly exposed surface has no treatment in the center.

The Thompson's is a good idea but you may want to consider ways to increase air circulation in and around your boards.You might want to consider putting your boards on 3/4" sq wood strips.

I am a building contractor and if I were tackling your problem I would use kiln dried redwood instead of pressure treated wood. It will increse you cost a cupla bucks but it will last longer (my opinion) than PT and looks much nicer (fact).
 

Randy McCord (12.104.215.172)
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2003 - 04:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks guys, I thought about the arsenic in the treated lumber, that's why I asked. Some places around here are selling the new stuff without the arsenic. Arsenic treated lumber is supposed to be phased out by 2004 I think. I guess I never thought about using redwood, that ought to hold up good. I also work in an industrial setting and the oil refinery here uses redwood on some of their cooling towers and it holds up pretty good considering its wet all the time. What do you mean by the 3/4" strips Craig? Put them between the collar and lid? Or collar and freezer?
 

Craig Johnson (172.191.139.70)
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2003 - 02:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Randy,

I am not certain what your design is but what I envision is you have a few 2x12s stacked on top of the refrigerator unit with a hole all the way through into the refrigerator. I am guessing that you are concerned with water pooling around the bottom 2x 12 that is in direct contact with the refrigerator. Basicly what I am suggesting is to raise your boards above anysurface with sitting moisture.

The industry term is called a "sleeper". When you go to work look at some of the machinery. You will notice that much of it is probably bolted to 4x4 rails/sleepers which are in turn bolted to the ground. This is most common with roof mounted air condition units or air handling units. My 3/4" square strip suggestion is just a miniaturized version of the 4x4.

Craig
 

Randy McCord (12.104.215.143)
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2003 - 06:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No, I'm adding a collar so I have more headroom in a chest freezer. Basically, Just raising the lid up 5-8 inches. A lot of people do this to run their taps out of when using as a serving fridge. I'm doing the same thing, but using it for fermentation this summer.
 

Craig Johnson (198.81.26.47)
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2003 - 06:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Whoops!! I thought you were doing something entirely different. I know what you are refering to now. I still think kiln dried redwood is the way to go, though.
 

Kyle Gendron (66.30.192.241)
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2003 - 06:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've seen a few web sites of guys that have put collars on their freezers. Many of them have used cedar becasuse it resists mildew and is moisture resistant.
 

Jim Keaveney (64.12.97.9)
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2003 - 04:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i used treated 2X8s and i have never had a problem with mold. as far as i know i haven't poisened myself either. the beer never comes in contact with the wood.
 

Randy McCord (12.104.215.146)
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2003 - 02:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's probably what I will use Jim as I can't find any redwood or cedar in this area that is 2X. All they seem to have around here are 1x's. Did you cote the treated wood with urethane or anything?

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