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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * October 16, 2003 * CFC Report... < Previous Next >

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Estebahn (206.214.61.215)
Posted on Saturday, September 27, 2003 - 04:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A few weeks back I posted a thread about CFC construction and usage. One of the problems I thought I would encounter was the ammount of time it would take to drain 10 gallons of wort through a 3/8" inner copper tube. Since some posters said the flow would be slow I put my burner up an additional nine inches with some cinderblocks and a piece of 3/4" plyood. After two brews I feel comfortable saying that overall the CFC performed quite well. It took only about 35 minutes to drain and cool 10+ gallons of wort. My tap water temp was about 75 degrees and the wort exiting the CFC registered at about 78 degrees. With a tap water temp of 75 degrees In the past I would have had to use a prechiller in conjunction with my old immersion chiller.

I can also say that for me the use of the CFC was less stressful than using my Immersion/Prechiller combination. I did not need to worry about constantly stirring and adding ice when appropriate. Instead I was able to transfer wort, cool wort, clean up and pitch yeast while the CFC was doing its thing. As a result my brew day decreased by at least 30-40 minutes (even when considering the time spent cleaning and sanitizing the CFC). While some folks might think that a CFC is not worth the time savings, my CFC cost around 30 bucks and only a few hours to construct.

Overall I am very happy and I would like to thank all the kind folks that contributed both pro and con to the CFC discussions.
 

Estebahn (206.214.61.215)
Posted on Saturday, September 27, 2003 - 04:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is pic of the CFC.

1,CFC1
 

Jim Layton (64.157.125.243)
Posted on Saturday, September 27, 2003 - 04:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Congrats, sounds like your CFC works beautifully.

In the interest of better beer, I'd like to suggest that you not pitch yeast until the wort is at or a little below your desired fermentation temperature.
 

Estebahn (206.214.61.215)
Posted on Saturday, September 27, 2003 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Try again.
CFC1
 

Harwich Hall Of Fame (208.59.33.27)
Posted on Monday, September 29, 2003 - 12:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Estebahn,
how did you sanitize your CFC? for the first time and for storage?
 

Al Schichler (64.208.165.164)
Posted on Monday, September 29, 2003 - 09:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just built a CFC with 20 feet of 3/8" copper tubing, and tested it with 5 gallons of boiling water. The inlet to it sits at the same level as the valve on my brewpot, and the outlet is about 8 inches or so below that, with a 2.5 foot long piece of tubing at the end of it. (About 3 feet from the valve to the end of the tubing in the carboy.
Anyway, it chilled the water down to 72 degrees in less than 15 minutes. (The cold tap water is about 68 degrees).
Hopefully it will work that well with real wort.
 

Estebahn (207.93.133.21)
Posted on Monday, September 29, 2003 - 09:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

To sanitize for the first time I ran some hot water/TSP solution through. I then ran some Iodophor through it immediately before brewing.

After brewing I again drain some TSP through it followed by iodophor. I then flush the CFC dry with some CO2 from my kegging setup. The CFC is then stored (relatively) dry.
 

Vince Turley (192.31.106.36)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 02:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Estebahn-
Sounds like I am going to go ahead and build a CFC after hearing both sides of the IC/CFC discussion over the past few weeks. I have a few questions:

- How long is your 3/8" copper tubing (total length of CFC)?

- What is the drop in height from your boil kettle spigot to the entry point of the CFC? And, from the exit of the CFC to the top of the primary? You are gravity feeding (no pump), right?

- What kind of pick-up tube arrangement do you have in your boil kettle (bazooka, FB, scrubbie, ?); do you get a lot of trub going throuh the CFC, and does this present any problems?

TIA, this board is a great resource!
-Vince
 

Rob F (12.154.254.158)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 04:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not Estebahn, and I don't even play him on TV, but I'll tell you about my CFC.

- 25' of 3/8" inside of garden hose with PhillChill Phittings. Garden hose flow valve for controlling water flow.

- The important height is not the height of the spigot, but the height of the wort. When I switched from a tall, narrow pot to a wide one, I had to increase the distance. It's about three feet. Another two feet to the fermenter.

- I use a scrubbie squeezed into about a half-inch space between pickup nipple and kettle bottom. Cold break trub is unavoidable with CFC, but not a problem in the opinions of many. With pellet hops a few green specs always make it to the fermenter, not a problem for me.
 

Jeff McClain (137.201.242.130)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 04:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually, the important height is the LOWEST point your drain will siphon from your kettle, since this will represent the worst case at the end of your drain flow head. Certainly it makes little to no difference what the height to the CFC is relative to the spigot, except to get a siphon started...

The only real thing that matters (assuming you can actually get a siphon started) is the hieght of wort in the boil kettle (as you said, Rob) to the hieght of the wort in the carboy. Typically, you want to make this calculation worst case, which means at the end of the drain session, which will be the entrance to the siphon (typically inside the boil kettle at the bottom of the dip tube or bazooka tube) to the top of your carboy (or where ever the top of the wort will be when the carboy is "full"). Then you have to add any resistance loss in due to the bazooka screen and the flow resistance inside the copper tube. I think there are some tables that could get you close with wort for tubing and flow head loss.

Regards,

-Jeff
 

Vince Turley (192.31.106.35)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 05:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My brewstand has the height of the BK spigot 21.5" from the floor (burner height is at 18") - I designed it this way so that after chilling (with my IC), I could drain directly into primary. The top of my MLT is at 66" - I cannot realistically add a couple of feet to my brewstand height to obtain the necessary drop to gravity feed the CFC AND continue gravity feeding the MLT to the BK.

Hmm… What if I keep my BK where it is now, and drain the hot wort into a plastic {sanitized} bottling bucket? I could then lift the bucket to the necessary height. I figure a plastic bucket would be easier to lift than a very hot and heavy Sanke BK. As long as I don't aerate the hot wort during transfer (HSA!), does anyone see a problem with this? Does anyone currently do this?

Or, I could just spend the $150US on pump and fittings and be done with it I guess…
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 05:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I say go for the pump, Vince. It's money extremely well spent and you won't be sorry.
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 05:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Um, have I said www.wortwizard.com lately?
 

Vince Turley (192.31.106.35)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 05:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Bill. When I consider the potential harm/injury that can occur when lifting hot wort, a pump seems like a small price to pay. And, there is a lot of utility that a pump can provide in addition to just cooling the wort (sparging, moving hot cleaning deterent around, etc.). Getting a pump really looks like a sound investement at this point... jeezzz, now how am I going to explain this "necessary" purchase to SWMBO?!!!

A few weeks back there was a post asking about the most important piece of equipment for brewing - I would have to say hands-down this forum has helped me the most.

Thanks all!
-Vince
 

Jeff McClain (137.201.242.130)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 10:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I love my pump...but it is a lot to spring for (especially if you have someone monitoring your brew costs).

-Jeff
 

Kurt Schweter (4.40.137.222)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 11:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

just use the " it's for my safety " line -
works to get all sorts of stuff -
of course, I'm a klutz so it's easy to have the
wife buy into it !
 

Rob F (69.140.138.3)
Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - 11:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I brew on a multi-level deck. The propane burner is on the upper deck surface, and everything else is on the steps or lower deck. When mashing, its

HLT on burner --> Igloo on step --> Kettle on lower deck

The kettle is moved up to the burner and for chilling its

Kettle on burner --> CFC on step -- Bucket on lower deck.

I only brew 5 gallons, and walking up the steps with the kettle isn't too tough or risky. Nevertheless, I see a pump in my future.

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