Topics Topics Help/Instructions Help Edit Profile Profile Member List Register  
Search Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Visit The Brewery's sponsor!
Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * March 30, 2004 * Botting for the long haul - barleywine < Previous Next >

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  Start New Thread        

Author Message
 

brewnorth (146.63.91.101)
Posted on Wednesday, March 17, 2004 - 08:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A question to those of you that have bottle to cellar:

I want to bottle a barley wine I have had in secondary for awhile (need space and bottles seem to be the best). Should I bottle with priming sugar or counter-pressure from keg? pros and cons?
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Wednesday, March 17, 2004 - 10:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's up to you. I prefer priming to counterpressure filling if I'm going to bottle an entire batch. I don't have to worry about chilling all the bottles in order to avoid foaming.
 

Adam W (128.125.6.113)
Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2004 - 12:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In addition, bottle conditioning has the added advantage of lessening the risk of oxidation (i.e. the yeast should absorb any oxygen that is introduced during bottling).
 

Dave Witt (172.140.202.95)
Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2004 - 12:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I CP filled a batch of BW about 3-4 months ago. The beer has an oxidized quality, but I don't think it was from the CP bottling operation. It sat in secondary for about 10 months, but was CO2 purged at racking.

The thing I like about CP filling, is that you can dial in the carbonation just right. IME, bottle conditioned BW and other big beers seem to pick up more carbonation as they age (in years). I have a Belgian dark strong ale in secondary (for 15 mos) that I will likely bottle condition (as the Belgians do).
 

U. Curjel (80.219.182.21)
Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2004 - 07:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I used the high krauesen method to carbonate my last BW, dropped the OG another point or so which was welcome but ended up with 2 vol of CO2, a touch on the high side for BW. I think that the time required and invested in a BW allows the yeast to do it's work more completely.
 

Joe Williams (144.106.63.60)
Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2004 - 07:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

U. Curjel,
You said you use the high krausen method to carbonate. In the classic styles book it says to "add a measured amount of actively fermenting wort, let it stand for a short time, and then bottle." I am trying to figure out what a "short time" means in real time. How long do you let it sit before you bottle?
 

U. Curjel (80.219.182.21)
Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2004 - 09:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When my fermenting beer was at what I considered to be high krauesen, I siphoned off 10% by volume then racked the BW into my Bottling bucket. Started bottling immediately. Bottle conditioned at 67¡ for about 3 weeks, after which the BW was moved to the cellar (55¡) for more conditioning. Worked for me. You could always split your batch and prime it two different ways for comparisons sake.
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2004 - 09:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have to ask why? What advantage do you see to this (other than curiousity) that makes it worth the effort?
 

U. Curjel (80.219.182.21)
Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2004 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny, I had what I felt was too high an OG (1.107-1.032) and figured that I might be able to drop it another point or so which was the case. The beer would have probably dropped on it's own had I been patient enough. I was just to freaked about leaving it on a big old primary yeast cake for too long. I had also read what Joe did and wanted to try "adding actively fermenting wort". Probably cause I could if for no other reason.
 

U. Curjel (80.219.182.21)
Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2004 - 09:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

check that, FG was too high, OG was just fine:-)

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.